* Posts by fajensen

1284 posts • joined 18 Jun 2008

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Mandiant ‘highly confident’ foreign cyberspies will target US midterm elections

fajensen

So, the priority is to "Worry about Foreigners" while the locals are doing their very best to sabotage US elections right out in the open?

Germany orders Sept 1 shutdown of digital ad displays to save gas

fajensen

Re: Germany, the country with no natural ressources and now also too little electric power.

Electricity in Germany costs a multiple of what it does in neighbouring France, which has kept its atomic power plants running.

Why is it that nuke-bro's are compelled to lie, even about things that can be easily verified: https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/europe-power-spot-prices-rise-as-wind-supply-set-to-fall

Do they think they are convincing anyone that they are persons that it would be safe to have around nuclear technology, are they the kind of dumb-ass drama queens that like Biggly is Better, or are they just value-signalling to their little church?

German baseload power TRDEBD1 for delivery on Wednesday was up 24.2% at 405 euros ($413.26) a megawatt hour (MWh) by 0911 GMT.

The equivalent French price TRFRBD1 gained 15.3% to 559 euros/MWh.

fajensen

Re: Pointless laws are pointless

Maybe they should, you know, not close all those nuke plants??

"They" being France you mean?

Germany closed their four nuclear plants quite a while ago, while France has quite recently closed half of theirs, nationalised and reconstructed the bankrupt EDF - so that someone can perhaps retain some of the nuclear capacity.

They have 12 plants with corrosion issues and cracks in pipework, that they now seem to have a solution for.

Then they have Flamanville, the never-ready next-generation EPR, with 10 years delay, cost overruns at about 15 billion EUR (so far), the parallel issues on Olkiluoto in Finland, Hinckley Point in the UK and to a lesser extent Taishan in China, casting grave doubts on whether anyone really has the skills to build these plants. "Grave Doubts" meaning: There will be no financing of nuclear plants unless bullet proof government guarantees decades into the future are given.

The French relied on nuclear electricity always being plentiful and available, now it is not so. They have to import their electricity from Germany, at premium prices, which the French government has capped, but, somebody are still picking up the tab so "Markets" don't go hungry: French Taxpayers!

Blaming for ones own inability to keep up with the mandatory scheduled maintainance of ones own nuclear fleet so it doesn't rot away at an inconvenient time, that is just crab mentality.

Nuclear is a dying technology. No use in flogging zombie horse!

77% of security leaders fear we’re in perpetual cyberwar from now on

fajensen
Facepalm

Re: How many windows users...

shouldn't software notify users of this event before the driver actually runs?

Microsoft made some decent moves in that direction with AppLocker, then immediately regretted it and broke it, the bigger market being in consultancies billing hours for fixing broken crap and promising that future Windows versions will fix the current broken crap.

As things are now, one needs a brain the size of Jupiter to configure it correctly and also a Windows Enterprise box. Once it does work, however, it will be deprecated, The Microsoft way!

Everyone else get to run Snap.Do!

Japan reverses course on post-Fukushima nuclear ban

fajensen

If it is so cost effective why are bills going up with a potential doubling of the cap price tomorrow?

That line of thinking went out with Karl Marx and cost+ defense procurement. Today, Markets decide the price, not production prices, and energy companies are very happy indeed about their cost effective production and the inefficient Markets!

Since the 1990's the FIRE-economy rules the world. About 2008, it had a little boo-boo. Some especially gifted "Brain Trust" running global finance decided that it would be good for con-fidence and growff to keep interest rates suppressed and even negative for decades, thereby inflating assets such as stock markets, bonds, real estate, wind farms, solar farms, skating rinks in the desert, water, fishing quoatas, and of course land.

Now, these same people see inflation and they figure that maybe facilitating a few people taking 99.99 of the worlds wealth using Free Credit was maybe going overbord at little, so, they are slowly raising interest rates, assets starts to unwind, as planned.

However, all that money that was created by the asset price inflation doesn't just disappear, instead it flows into different "inflation proof" investments, like food, raw materials and energy.

On top of that mess evolving, we suddenly have the war in Ukraine creating a shock in the market and an immediate shortage of raw materials and energy and of course setting off a feeding-frenzy in "The Market".

*That* hits the energy bills, only Regulation will stop it and things will be really dire before that can happen, corona was only setting the mood.

*) FIRE - Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate.

fajensen

Re: Human failures, not Nuclear

Reality has a way of finding the holes in ones grand designs.

fajensen
Pint

... staffed by a bunch of bozos (which the Japanese aren't,

I think that for any population or group one cares to investigate, 1 in 5 of will be a moron!

The "moron quotient" is quite independent on how the population was selected. Whatever we do, invariably, 20% of ones colleagues will in fact be idiots. My experience in big-science and engineering matches well with those numbers.

In Japan, the grid frequency is 50 Hertz in Eastern Japan (Tokyo, Yokohama and other northern area), and 60 Hertz in Western Japan. They cannot easily transfer power between the regions because the links do not have the capacity so they have more trouble with varying electricity demands and supplies than they should have.

This could be solved with technology that Japan also have (Hitachi makes FACTS, and HVDC links) or standardising, but, they cannot decide to go for one of the frequency standards for whatever, politics, probably, and they won't buy the HVDC links because, probably, it is a lot cheaper to just standardise.

The same happens in Sweden, but for different reasons. The people who own Sweden likes cheap power for their mining and smelters in the North. They get that from hydroelectic power plants. They like to keep it that way so when the electrical market was created, "somehow", no new North-South link capacity was built even though "The Market" should have magicked that up.

Their "solution" is similar, to push for nuclear power in the South, knowing damn well that even if they manage to build this thing, all that "cheap and abundant" power is immediately going to be sucked right up into the EU Markets, while Northern electricy prices stays exactly the same, because the power that cannot be transferred cannot be sold in "The Market".

It takes 15-30 years to build a new nuclear power plant, so that is 15-30 years where "we don't have to do anything inconvenient because The Solution is riiight around the corner, any day now, just these small cracks in some castings."

Delay and distract (and old people, pining for their good old days) is "the game" behind the sudden interest in nuclear power, nobody important cares that it won't work and it cannot work - because of the Morons, who will, inevitably, end up in key positions all over the supply chain, management and in operations.

fajensen

Re: Excellent news

Apparently we have enough "waste" in storage in the UK to supply all our lecky needs for a century

And a pile of it is still sitting in the basement of THORP. One could go and clean it up right now - except we won't - because leaving piles of shit for the grandchildren and taxpayers is just what people will do. Always.

Even IF the technology worked "as it says on the tin", people will soon find ways to skim off the top, defer scheduled maintainance, use dodgy parts and materials instead of the expensive stuff, hire morons for the operations, and suddenly (if it doesn't cook off):

"We" are France - all our Glorious Nuclear Future sitting, stuck, at 0.4 generating capacity due to all manner of problems generally caused by mismanagement and systems decay, ERF going bankrupt and bailed out by the generous taxpayers as always.

Nuclear proponents and communists share the same idea that their garbage ideas can work because This Time we will find the perfect people, the perfect organisation and the perfect tech to run it. And each time it goes to shit, it was because "other people and it wasn't done right"!

Modeling software spins up plans for floating wind turbines

fajensen

Re: Rickover rolling over.

So what is so fantastic with a floating nuclear power station.

It can sink and it will corrode even faster than a standard nuclear power plant?

fajensen

Re: Rickover rolling over.

And when it cooks off, we get a FREE nature reserve!

UK launches 'consultation' with EU over exclusion from science programs

fajensen
Flame

Re: Liz Truss will Save us All

Yeah, but, Labour's Braniac will find a clever way to lose to the Crazy Cat Lady!

fajensen

For instance, with critical regulatory and safety agencies like EURATOM,

There is a competive advantage in writing the rules.

The UK specialists were very good at that and well respected for their work too. For example, most of REACH and the rules on recycleable plastics were written by the UK and I know people who work with these things that are not enthusiastic about Germany and France taking over.

fajensen

Re: Leaver whining!

I disagree. I think it would have been much more prudent to try to reform the EU from within

This is not possible when the UK and pretty much the rest of the EU disagrees on what the EU should become.

Two thirds of DNS queries for IPv6 hosts sent to Chinese resolvers fail, researchers find

fajensen

I think, in China, having you data oficially vetted is not only the kind of offer that you can't refuse but also a proposition that the clients must support with visible enthusiasm.

fajensen

Maybe the redirect into the Chinese security services just needs a bigger pipe?

Like Ubuntu, just a bit less hassle: Linux Mint 21 'Vanessa'

fajensen

I got one of those disk-dup'er jobbies.

So, now I buy a fresh SSD, duplicate the old disk to that, see how the upgrade goes, if theres anything I don't like, I reinstall from scracth and copy "/home" across from the old one.

fajensen

Re: Been using the Beta for a couple of weeks

Oh, yes. And the "Missing Locale Bug". The one that always comes up after a few kernel upgrades.

Each time, I think I should maybe try and dig into this for Glory, then I remember enthusiastically digging into why the printer suddenly didn't work and then I let that ancient evil be, less it rises and forces a reinstall from scratch to fix!

fajensen

Re: Been using the Beta for a couple of weeks

impossible to set it to UK, or if you do it ignores the selection and still spell checks incorrectly.

It is just striving to provide the same user experience that Microsoft Office so generously provides!

Financial exchange's efforts to replace core systems with blockchain founder – again

fajensen

Re: doomed, doomed I say

Who sold them that shit anyway? That's the kind of sales people I'd like on my team!

How a crypto bridge bug led to a $200m 'decentralized crowd looting'

fajensen

American work culture?

Meta asks line managers to identify poorly performing staff for firing

fajensen

Not really, people can be rubbish at their work and they can be rubbish at following the rituals that shows proper veneration for the organisation.

Only the latter item guarantees dismissal, almost as if the work was never that important.

UK govt promises to sink billions into electronic health records for England

fajensen
Coat

Re: "backed by £2 billion [..] in funding"

Those are rookie numbers! The pros can do "GBP 37 billion last we checked - and still going up": https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/127/public-accounts-committee/news/150988/unimaginable-cost-of-test-trace-failed-to-deliver-central-promise-of-averting-another-lockdown

fajensen

Re: Our data, not theirs to sell

An simple and effective counter-measure would be to put Dido Harding in charge of it!

Intel’s CEO shouldn’t be surprised America can’t get CHIPS Act together

fajensen
Mushroom

My schadenfreude over watching America circling ever closer to the drain is somewhat tempered by the fact that, once does go down, we will have a "White Taliban" country with about 800 millitary bases and thousands of nukes!

The perfect crime – undone by the perfect email backups

fajensen

Re: One wonders what will happen when ...

And, all they have to do is: "Loook! Over There!! There's a Muslim/Tranny doing something"!!!

Toyota wants 'closed loop' EV batteries in its future cars

fajensen

Re: Value in old things...

Well, "we*" are allowing poverty to exist and thrive, so, "society" belives it has value: Obviously, we can't then have workarounds and hacks that diminish the effects of being poor?

*) My personal opinion is that poverty should not exist in an advanced economy like ours. Being "advanced" kinda implies that any medieval and 3'rd world stuff should not be allowed here. It diminishes our investment in "civilisation", as it were. However, The Daily Mail segment wants it differently and they are in government, so...

fajensen

Re: "a closed loop battery manufacturing process"

Toyota kinda have to come up with a system like that to sell EV's in the EU market. They haven't got an EV-car yet, it takes a few years to get there, so they will have to have the production set up for "what it is like in 2025".

There are EU rules and directives about companies "taking their own crap back".

For car-makers the trip into new territory on recykliing started in earnest with the plastic and composite parts (the metals were already "done"), but, the scope of the "circular economy" is being gradually expanded and the enforcement is getting stricter too.

Used EV-batteries are an obvious next iteration, Toyota probably believe that if they can get in front of the process and set an example, that example will become what Everyone must implement, and then they will have a competitive advantage.

I like the idea too.

Microsoft promises to tighten access to AI it now deems too risky for some devs

fajensen

Re: Demo-cracy

Yeah, it really sucks to be law enforcement, knowing there's something bigger, stronger, that you just can't bully into compliance.

Drone ship carrying yet more drones launches in China

fajensen

Re: Pointless PR

A normal battle ship has a ludicrous amount of people for its size, all milling around, and barely managing to avoid creating more problems than those they are supposed to solve. These ships are running at capacity :)

If robots are there for the fighting and shooting, or really just sitting inside sealed containers in a protective atmosphere, then one could have a lot fewer meatbags run around fixing things, and doing maintainance.

A normal ship's crew of perhaps 12-15 people would be sufficient. They don't even have to know what the mission is and with a crew that small one could afford to pay and feed them well enough to not really care.

fajensen

Re: @trindflo - intercept and expel?

The point of Afghanistan was to never win, but to use up loads of kit, and to keep at least one war cooking forever, benefiting "The Economy", and having a convenient "existential threat" around to justify it all. The problem being that the old USSR so rudely and totally unexpected shat the bed and croaked, leaving everyone grasping for new threats :p

I think Kuwait was different because they still had all those weapons and equipment stockpiled for when the USSR would pour through the Fulda Gap, so they took that opportunity to re-target, use it all up and restock.

But, Afghanistan was just retarded: We are spending hundreds of billions annually, and growing that +5% p/a, on a very technical millitary that basically just bombs some rubble into smaller rubble, because thats all the threat there was left to bomb in Afghanistan after 6 months.

But, we can rejoice, Russia is back in the game, things are normalised, we have a decent enough threat to fear, and the defence business will be roaring back to its old glory again.

Shanghai lockdowns to end, perhaps easing tech supply chain woes

fajensen

Re: Hooray! The lockdowns are ending...

Boris? I don't think Boris can read.

fajensen

Re: Hooray! The lockdowns are ending...

Selection bias: I just assume that everyone too stupid and crass to not use their position to gob off about how other people should cook for 35p or demand we man up and work 3 jobs to survive, they are indeed a cunt all the way through.

The problem with rich cunts is that wealth amplifies their cunt'ish personality, and allows them to inflict their general stupidity, evil, or both, onto everyone else, who must suffer under it. Making it a civilisation-problem rather than just the usual some-idiot-gobbing-off-at-the-asda-checkout stuff, that we can deal with.

I am sure that Vladimir Putin worked so hard for his money and pulled himself all the way up by his bootlaces, like a real self-made guy. That doesn't make him anything less of an arsehole, does it?

fajensen

Re: That's the tech sector.

What irks me about the Uygur Outrage is that, if they were living in the Middle East, we would be droning them and some parts of "my" government would be openly working on plans to send them off to camps in Uganda!

All empires are the same!

fajensen
Coat

Re: Hooray! The lockdowns are ending...

Nope. But, We can go back to work rebuilding the economies of some rich cunts!

Our own economies will remain fucked, and that will be ensured by people like Jerome Powell strongly believing that too much is still being left on the table for workers - after ramming inflation rates into the rails, and scumbags like Boris Johnson and Putin fucking some shit up on every occasion they have!!

IBM ends funding for employee retirement clubs

fajensen

What are they going to do with all this money?

Invest it in assets that their mates on the political side can then inflate so they can make more money to invest in stuff that inflates and makes more money.

These are generally boring people. Their worst excesses will be stuff like wearing an item of brightly coloured cloting at a dresscode event, and maybe they will buy a newpaper or a few politicians or create a think-tank, so they can build some kind of audience for their mostly boring and ill-concieved ideas.

Elon Musk is pretty much the outlier.

Broadcom's stated strategy ignores most VMware customers

fajensen
Pint

Re: But it's a winning strategy.

I imagine that Broadcom has ideas about where that money will be spent.

A company that bought the software graveyard that is Symantic is all out of good ideas; Or maybe they wanted to grind down all that dead code and put it in various system-health products, kinda like the Victorians did with mummies?.

fajensen

Re: But it's a winning strategy.

Maybe. But, if "the volume" is not there, the risk is that they will become bound to serve the kinks of their "600 most favored clients", becoming more and more specialised, while "The Market" happily kicks off in some different and new direction: Someone else will provide the cheap gateway drug for Virtualisation, and those people will capture the "next thing".

Bang & Olufson tried a similar move, going only for "high-end customers", then finding that "high-end" don't invest enough in 15000 EUR TV's to keep the factory running. In the meantime the little people who bought faithfully at the cheaper end of the B&O product line discovered the Japanese HiHi equipment.

When management went nuclear on an innocent software engineer

fajensen
Mushroom

Re: nice story

nuclear waste is nasty but fits in a few oil drums

Why must the nuke bro's always lie?

Just shows again and again that nuclear power is the enery "solution" for the high-functioning moron, the kind that can do pattern matching and scripted actions just well enough to have a decent career and therefore believes that others barely can understand their unique brilliance,

.... so they dont have to make any effort at all.

fajensen

Re: nice story

Even Chernobyl was basically inconsequential, looked at rationally.

I believed Joseph Stalin died before Chernobyl? Anyway, he was a very rational guy!

Tech pros warn EU 'data adequacy' at risk if Brexit Britain goes its own way

fajensen
Flame

Re: diverging to make a political point about the UK's independence

I don't think there is a plan as such. These people are simple "smash & grab" looters. Hand to Mouth people.

The only consistent "strategic thing", I see, is that the Tory regime will prefer to create some fresh controversy or another fuck-up to cover up some other mess they have made recently, like people not being able to afford food, heating and electicity, over fixing anything.

Not that they care, but, it is bad for "The Brand".

Perhaps the "thinking" here is that, if one manage to kick off a trade war with the EU, those inconveniences can be blamed on "The EU", "Germany" and "The Frech", therefore nothing needs to be done about any of them them apart from many ranting articles about WWII and The Royals in The Daily Mail.

Bosses using AI to hire candidates risk discriminating against disabled applicants

fajensen
Boffin

You don't apply for a job as a shelf stacker because you see a great career in stacking shelves. You do it because you want to eat.

That may be so, but, to get the job you first need to truly believe that your Dream and Only Purpose in Life is to become the worlds bestest, happiest, and most dedicated shelf stacker in order to first fool the AI, then HR and finally convince the recruiting panel!

The cruelty is intentional.

IBM's autonomous Mayflower ship breaks down in second transatlantic attempt

fajensen

During my journey towards becoming an old duffer, I have noticed a distinctive shift in management style.

A new type of leadership is rising, men in their 30's, who are very good at talking, presenting and selling, while being even better at never implementing any of it, so they can sell more, faster, get more "wins", and move up faster, than we BOFs who are hindered by also implementing what we just sold.

Google cancels bi-annual performance reviews, shifts to GRAD system

fajensen

Re: Always strange to see this line parroted

The pay is one factor, but, I think that "Not being assholes towards staff" is the bigger one.

Being stingy and inflexible with time-off, tight schedules while insisting on holding several weekly 3 hour progress meetings where there is always one idiot manager that has a 60 slide deck as an opus to his greatness and this is tolerated, minimally deal with bullying and harassment by keeping the offender in place and relocating the offended, ghosting people then complaining about their commitment to The Cause, on top the usual excessive certification-, bureaucracy- and documentation- circles of Hell.

All this builds up resentment over time until the cup is full. Once it is, nobody good cares about the 14% because the market price just went higher for also tolerating all the other bullshit.

In IT, no good deed ever goes unpunished

fajensen

Re: The EDI project .....

Instead of just solving problems and improving things, the clever Management likes to keep a back-catalogue of things that can be fixed.

Because, when someone in HQ desires that they deliver savings or efficiency KPI’s are introduced, they can deliver something and then they will get something in return.

Fixing something without instructions is basically sabotaging their next bonus. It makes them angry. It also makes them angry when nobody has any solutions.

So, by all means document issues and solutions, but, never fix anything unless there’s something in doing it.

If you fire someone, don't let them hang around a month to finish code

fajensen

Re: Unhelpful comments

Ahh, Those were the golden times: ONE book for the CPU, another book for the Peripherals.

Each book amounted to about 120 pages or so. One could read the documention for an entire system on the train.

Todays CPU are a 1200 page volume for the version 1.0 CPU, then six more with the Errata's and descriptions of variants, then one more tome for each on-board peripheral or bus, and each of those books have erratas, but, those mostly come as PDF's and are left to "the user" to discover.

fajensen

Re: When firing yes, when quitting probably not

If someone tells you they are quitting then lock them out on their last day not before.

Most organisations are narcisstic to some degree. And, narcissists does not handle rejection very well.

The higher the level of group-narcissim is, the more the organisation will try to take revenge over being failed by the quitters!

fajensen
Flame

Why, no idea

"Our" fairly large and reasonably innovative at the time project got transferred to India for "maintainance".

Our site were to be the 3'rd line support. However, those indian capital wankers kept toying with the code, breaking it, then whining to everyone up the coporate "value chain" about how smart they were to find all these bugs, followed by more whining when instructed by developers "to put it back to how it was and stop tinkering, that will fix it!", quite soon, we were instructed to just fix all of their breakage - a.k.a. put it all back to how it was, except for those parts we missed.

This pissed everyone royally off so, in the end we gave the Indians what they were angling for: The full ownership of the entire code base, except, part of the handover was a localisation project. That was done totally By The Book: All strings, "all" of course meanbing also the comments, were replaced with numeric codes, referencing text strings, so the precompiler cold do translation of all of those the strings for proper Localisation and the local team could read the comments in their native language.

Or should have, because, along the way, the comment-string localisation database somehow got lost inside of ClearCase and since it was not our teams product to support anymore, indeed ther was no more funding .... nothing could be done about finding it.

Eventually, the "Splat" on The Bottom Line from India made the codebase come back. But, the team is gone, the rest of the code has been sucked into Rational Rose RT and turned to gibberish, and all the comment strings remain lost in ClearCase.

10x prices, year-long delays... Life as an electronics engineer in global chip shortage

fajensen

Ahhh, The benefits of dumbass, geriatric, serial fuck-up & fail-up, "leadership" running a trade war on their main factory without any further thoughs or preparation being made for it!

Already in 2018, my TBTF-project was quoted delivery times of more than six months on simple screws, clips and fasteners. I guess the proceedings are slowly moving up the value chain and Pharma will be next to become stuck in some ill defined bureaucratic miasma?

UK Ministry of Defence takes recruitment system offline, confirms data leak

fajensen

Re: "sources finger Capita-run system"

Control Fraud: Crapita are the ones with the F1 tickets, posh boarding school grants and fat, fat donations to The Cause. Those are the real selection criteria.

C: Everyone's favourite programming language isn't a programming language

fajensen

Re: SF Novel

... All the misery of modern existence - accompanied by the screeching chorus of the covidiots about how lockdowns is wut made us depressed!

I hope your doctors appointment turns out to be a waste of their time!

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