* Posts by Paul_Canada

7 posts • joined 24 Mar 2022

Researchers claim quantum device performs 9,000-year calculation in microseconds

Paul_Canada

Re: Better

This is a good observation!

Photons: I'm not 100% sure, but my understanding is that the spin of a photon particle correlates to the polarization of the wave. Light waves are electromagnetic fields. However the "spin" in charged particles is ±½ and in photons it's ±1. If I understood, correctly: ½ means it interacts via charge, 1 means it does not. How spin works scientifically and mathematically, is beyond me.

Neutrinos: Theoretically neutrinos do have a magnetic moment, the strength which is really really tiny. So tiny it has never been experimentally verified.

Paul_Canada

Re: Better

P.S. Spin is a scalar measure, it has no vector. It's often visualized like this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spin_(physics)#/media/File:Spin_One-Half_(Slow).gif

Paul_Canada

Re: Better

So! Entanglement is not faster than light in that there is no "travelling" happening between the two particles. Two entangled particles have a shared quantum state, which is broken as soon as one particle interacts with any other particle or field. Until then both particles exist in both/all states simultaneously. Once interacted, the spin of one particle immediately implies the opposite spin in the other - the quantum state is determined instantaneously. The act of measuring the spin also counts as an interaction and would thus break the entanglement. It cannot thus be used for any meaningful superluminal communication. There is no time travel, it's just how quantum physics works, but casualty is always preserved.

As for spin, the atomic particles do not actually spin. At the subatomic level, charged particles (electrons and protons) act like tiny little magnets. Since magnetism appears when a charged particle is moving, it baffled scientists that a charged particle not moving much could have such a strong magnetic field. Back in the old days, they assumed that the particles were solid and spinning, and it was this spin creating the magnetic field. However with the advent of quantum physics, it became clear that the particles were not actually spinning as they're not solid but instead point-like particles (the quarks are, protons are not as they're made up by quarks). The name spin stuck, but really in simple terms, it would be called "intrinsic magnetism". This "spin" exists only in certain states, so unlike a magnet it's, as you'd expect in Quantum physics, "quantized".

Amazon puts 'creepy' AI cameras in UK delivery vans

Paul_Canada
WTF?

Ughh. I'm just gonna cancel my prime membership. Enough.

Debugging source is even harder when you can't stop laughing at it

Paul_Canada

Profanity galore

When I was a new developer, I used to leave rather rude excecutives in the git messages whenever I would get frustrated. I never considered that years later people might dig back into that history! It was pretty embarrassing because the recently new manager at the time didn’t like me, and was always bringing me up on it. Fortunately I quit not too longer after, but it makes me feel warm and fuzzy to know that my sweary messages have been immortalized.

Mozilla creates paid-for subscriptions for web doc library

Paul_Canada

Apple supposedly values privacy and security, so it would be great if Apple (Safari) would ditch their Webkit nonsense and hop on the Gecko bandwagon. WebKit has fallen behind Blink and Gecko engines, it should be called SafarIE.

Switching to Gecko would:

1. Bring Safari into the 21st century: feature complete + not buggy.

2. Non-Mac devs: ensure websites work in Safari via Firefox.

3. 2 teams: faster development cycle for Gecko.

4. Bring in decent extension support.

5. Ensures that Blink doesn't just take over everything.

US, Canada to figure out rules on cops and Feds accessing people's data across borders

Paul_Canada
Facepalm

Well screw it!

We may as well just join the US at the rate this nonsense is going!

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