* Posts by aerogems

978 publicly visible posts • joined 16 Feb 2021

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Now IBM sued for age discrim by its own HR veterans

aerogems Silver badge

Re: PART 1625—AGE DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT ACT

Oligarchs are free to break the law with abandon. What's even worse is how US politicians pretend like we're somehow better than places like Russia or Ukraine when it comes to corruption. Then you look at people like Clarence Thomas, who's in the news again for taking money/accepting gifts from right-wing nutjobs who bring a lot of cases before the Supreme Court, and not disclosing it or recusing himself from those cases.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: It's time to help IBM

"When the fallout settles, IBM will have gaggles of kids running everything (over the cliff)."

And that's different from now... how?

IBM has been selling off everything good about the company over the past decades. They sold off their ThinkPad business, HDD business, their Big Blue division... All the things that IBM used to be known for they've sold off to other companies. I'm not even really sure what IBM does nowadays. Once upon a time they were set to be a full-service provider. Now the only thing they seem to be known for is getting sued for really clumsy layoffs that are obviously targeting older workers.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: HR...

"At what point does a company suddenly realise that it is not simply a quarterly profit and loss account but an essential part of a community?"

I think that's usually as they are winding down operations because they've gone bankrupt and the last person is turning out the lights. Assuming it ever happens at all, because a lot of people at the C-Suite level are sociopaths. At least in the colloquial sense, even if they may not fit the clinical definition. They don't give a shit about other people.

aerogems Silver badge
FAIL

Where to begin?

First off, where the hell are IBM's shareholders? The company is seemingly constantly being sued for age discrimination, so why hasn't the board, and/or shareholders, started cleaning house at the C-Suite? Even if, and it seems to be a pretty big if, but even if all the lawsuits are completely baseless, the fact that they continue to happen under the watch of current leadership means something is amiss. This is an example of why the US needs to give the EEOC the ability to initiate investigations into companies even without someone filing a complaint. If the EEOC director in the district where IBM's HQ keeps sees stories about IBM being sued for age discrimination, maybe they think it's a good idea to send someone over to conduct an unannounced review of IBM's records to see if there's something going on the agency needs to slap down.

Second, doesn't anyone at IBM think these things through? I mean... if you're going to fire a bunch of people in HR, you need to be extra careful because HR is the keeper of company secrets and tends to know where all the bodies are buried because they're the ones who buried them. I mean, the person mentioned in the article who saw her own name on a list of people to fire, could easily look up the records of the people on that list to find out their ages and probably also check past performance reviews. They could print all this off -- who would think it odd that an HR rep is printing off HR records? -- exfiltrate it from the company, and since they have a good-faith belief that it is evidence of the commission of a crime, would be completely in the clear legally (in the US at least) in turning it over to the appropriate regulatory body. IBM wouldn't be able to do dick about it except huff and puff. IBM deserves to be nailed to the wall for sheer incompetence alone. The fact that it's very clearly against the law is also a reason to nail them to the wall with railroad spikes. How is it people who are getting paid millions of dollars can't seem to figure out things that should be obvious to anyone who's ever been a manager and should have had some basic training on US employment law? IBM can pay me half of what they're paying their current CEO. One of the first things I'd do is hire an outside law firm to come in and do a prostate exam level review of all recent mass layoffs, and if there's even a whiff of something illegal having gone on, anyone involved who was still around would be escorted out of the building by security after being relieved of their access badge immediately. Then, if IBM still gets sued for age discrimination, at least they're saving money on my salary.

Third, it seems the old adage about no one ever getting fired for choosing IBM only applies if you're an IBM customer. Choosing IBM as your employer seems to be a very different story.

How is this problem mine, techie asked, while cleaning underground computer

aerogems Silver badge
Flame

Lucky

Doug is lucky, he only had to deal with mud and dust. Once upon a time I worked as a repair tech for a retail chain. In comes a system that just reeked of cigarette smoke. Saying you could smell it a mile away was far less of an exaggeration than it should have been. Once I open the thing up, the entire inside was literally coated with a thick film of tar. There were tar-cicles on the fan blades, and if you thought the smell was bad before... I was amazed the system hadn't died a long time prior. Ended up just sending the unit back as a biohazard, but my best guess is the weight of all that tar on the various fan blades ended up burning out the motors, or at least slowing them down enough that things overheated and baked to death.

Google on trial: Feds challenge deals that set your web search defaults

aerogems Silver badge

Re: The end of Firefox

Mozilla might cease to be, but I suspect Firefox will continue on as a volunteer driven effort no matter what. It started out life as a single person who stripped out everything except the browser from the old Mozilla suite (now known as Seamonkey) and there's still likely enough interest to keep it going. Releases may become a bit slower, but they'll keep coming.

aerogems Silver badge

If it were the best

Why does Google need to pay everyone millions of dollars (in the case of Apple, I think they literally pay them a billion dollars) to be the default? If it were truly the best, wouldn't device makers set it as the default for free?

Call me an Apple fan, says Huawei founder and chief exec

aerogems Silver badge

Re: I, for one, am not surprised

I don't think it's so much they don't understand the shoe tying, it's that they're intentionally playing dumb because they think it works in their favor somehow. One thing you can say about fascist dictatorships, when someone doesn't have to worry about the next election it does free them from all pretenses.

aerogems Silver badge

Lessons are fine

But the more or less shameless copying they've done of Apple's iPhone and iOS is a whole other story. You want to buy a device and disassemble it to see if you can improve your own manufacturing process, that's fine. Making your device look and act exactly the same, or at least as close as you can reasonably get Android to mimic iOS, that's something else entirely.

Lawsuit claims Google Maps led dad of two over collapsed bridge to his death

aerogems Silver badge

Several of which were already answered in TFA.

aerogems Silver badge

Some years ago, on the local news, some dumb bint was actually bragging about how she ignored a bunch of warning signs and drove off an incomplete overpass. But I digress.

I was all set to say "that sucks, but why didn't he just stop when he saw the bridge was out" when up pops the bit that it was basically a dark and stormy night. Honestly, it sounds like there's plenty of blame to go around. The city/county/whatever, could have either fixed the bridge or put up signage at least. Grab a couple of those heavy concrete road divider barriers and put 'em on either side along with some "bridge out" signs.

Much as I generally dislike Google, I can't really fault them much on this one. They can't be expected to know when every single bridge is out, or road is closed everywhere in the world. Usually they rely on municipalities updating public databases they can hoover up and integrate into their apps. So, I understand the pain they're feeling, but clearly Google is the target simply because of the deep pockets the company has. The fault lies with whatever government agency is in charge of that road and took absolutely no preventative measures, despite apparently having years to do so.

Bootnote: Let's take a moment to look back at an old Register article from 2013: https://www.theregister.com/2013/09/26/apple_maps_directed_drivers_onto_alaskan_airport_taxiways/

Uncle Sam names three Amazon execs as Prime suspects in subscription ripoff case

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Dark patterns on-hold

Probably just my unique temperament, but if I were the CC rep, I'd sit on hold my entire shift just to tell the merchant (when they finally pick up) that I will be reversing every single disputed charge I get from them because of how long I had to wait on hold. And if they never pick up, because the phone number goes to a phone in a little used room in a basement somewhere, I'd document the fact that I waited on hold X amount of time and that it's probably a violation of some policy of the CC company for vendors, and just start reversing any disputed charge immediately. Probably won't take too long for the vendor to notice they're losing money and to call you up to find out why.

aerogems Silver badge

I can't say about other countries, but in the US there are free trials for Prime for people with .edu email accounts and the like. If you don't cancel the sub by the end of that trial period, it automatically converts into an annual sub. They don't send you any kind of notice that your trial period is about to end and they bury the fact that it rolls over in the fine print knowing full well most people won't read it. And they make finding the link to even start the unsubscribe process highly obtuse.

aerogems Silver badge
Coffee/keyboard

Never Change, El Reg

Uncle Sam names three Amazon execs as Prime suspects

Come for the snark, stay for the news.

That aside, something needs to be done about the unsubscribe process. Amazon's not the only one that makes just finding where to start the process as difficult as possible. I was recently trying to cancel a Walmart+ sub and after a few minutes of not finding anything obvious in the app, I literally had to google it. Meanwhile, signing up for it is like 2-3 steps and they make sure there are links plastered all over the place.

Menacing marketeers fined by ICO for 1.9M cold calls

aerogems Silver badge

Let me guess

They can just declare bankruptcy to get out of paying, create a new company, and start up their operation all over again. By the time they get caught (again) they'll have squirreled away most of their ill gotten gains in a bank account in a bank where they won't cooperate with any requests from the UK government.

Out of curiosity, do the UK and/or Australian versions also exempt political calls? Just wondering how universal the self-serving politician thing is.

Neuralink's looking for participants willing to be part of human trials

aerogems Silver badge

Re: I might give it a go...

The whole colonize Mars thing was always just a grift to fund SpaceX. You think that attention starved narcissist could deal with the 6-month trip to Mars without being able to check Twitter?

aerogems Silver badge

Re: I can't believe I am going to type this

While I don't disagree, I believe NASA is still making its own rockets, they just (stupidly IMO) retired the Shuttle program. But the Starlink thing, especially based on some of the things we learned about via the book about twitler that just came out... Twitler basically can watch Ukrainian troop movements in real-time, and he's started spouting Russian propaganda of late, so if he ever gets it in his head to leak any of that info on Twitter it could be disastrous for Ukraine which is literally fighting for its very existence. I'm also not fond of having thousands of additional objects obscuring the view of astronomers, and requiring them to account for each little satellite if they get some unexpected reading.

I've always been of the opinion that government agencies like the military and NASA should be fully self-sufficient because of the sensitive nature of some of the things they do. Everything from building their own fighter jets to sidearms. Not that my opinion accounts for, anything really, when it comes to those matters.

Also, noted on the drug classification, which only makes marijuana being Schedule 1 all the dumber. I don't think there's any objective way you can claim marijuana needs to be regulated more stringently than cocaine.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: I can't believe I am going to type this

He didn't really have a choice but to put Shotwell in charge at SpaceX. Moron decided it'd be a good idea to let himself be filmed smoking a blunt. We can talk about the stupidity of marijuana being a Schedule 1 drug in the US among the ranks of heroin and cocaine, but it doesn't change the fact that it is so classified, and that possessing and smoking it is a federal crime. A federal crime Twitler decided to have himself filmed committing while holding a US Security Clearance.

Condolences on your cancer. Since you read El Reg you can't be THAT bad a person. If there are people in a similar position who are willing to sign up for Twitler's program, I salute their willingness to sacrifice for the potential benefit for the rest of us. However, when it comes to Neurolink, I suspect their sacrifice would be wasted. There are others who have been at this game a lot longer than Twitler and they haven't managed devices that are orders of magnitude less complex than what Twitler's attempting. I'd much rather see volunteers sign up for clinical trials with those outfits. It has nothing to do with Twitler being a raging arsehole, and more to do with the fact that a lot of really smart people have been working on this a long time and they haven't managed to crack it yet, so the idea that Twitler can just throw a bunch of money around and magically achieve the equivalent of cold fusion in his garage, is rather bonkers.

aerogems Silver badge
Stop

*Hard* Pass

I cannot stress just how hard of a pass that would be for me. After reading about how many research animals they had to put down as a result of massive infections because of the abattoir conditions of their lab, and how they were transporting biohazardous waste around without proper safeguards.. even if Twitler offered me his entire fortune, I'd tell him where he can stuff it. What good is all that money if I'm a drooling vegetable the rest of my life? Or worse, being completely lucid, but trapped in my meat sack body.

GNU turns 40: Stallman's baby still not ready for prime time, but hey, there's cake

aerogems Silver badge

Re: RMS contribution

They really only kept the OpenStep API and some of the design elements on the UI like the dock. Otherwise, OS X is fundamentally FreeBSD under the hood. But I swear around the 10.3 or 10.4 days I remember hearing about how they moved something like the printer subsystem back into the main kernel and vaguely remember hearing about similar things being moved back into the kernel instead of being separated out as the whole microkernel design would dictate with other versions. I fully admit I wasn't paying close attention at the time and my memory is fuzzy, so I could be conflating it with something else.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: RMS contribution

Didn't Apple attempt to use some kind of microkernel design with the early versions of OS X? And then they had to walk that back more and more with each version because the performance was just so bad.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: A Complicated Man

Hat's off to you if you can find a way to work with him, but the essence of compromise is everyone being willing to change at least a little bit. Based on some of the stories I've heard about him, like literally standing behind students and dictating the code they should write when his carpel tunnel got so bad he couldn't do it himself anymore, makes me think I'd probably quickly realize I'd have a more productive conversation with a brick wall, and set off in search of the nearest brick wall.

But, again, that doesn't change the fact that he has had a pretty outsized impact on the computing world. Odds are none of us will be remembered the same way RMS will, so in that regard he's accomplished more than most.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: 1991

Or maybe he meant that, since they'd be borrowing from a far more complete kernel, they would have leapfrogged early Linux. Linux 0.01 barely qualifies as functional in that it booted up... and not a whole lot else. If we imagine an alternate universe where Linus took, for example, the Minix kernel and just sort of hacked it up to do things like use 386 protected memory functions, version 0.01 would probably have looked very different.

aerogems Silver badge

A Complicated Man

RMS may be a dick and a generally unpleasant human being, being the OG "neckbeard", but there is no denying that he managed to have a pretty significant impact on the software world. Without him there'd be no Eric Raymond to basically put Stallman's ideas into a form that was easier for people to understand, and also not be such a hard ass about everything so that the idea of open source could take hold. There's also his work with Emacs, which may be a niche program, but has had an outsized impact.

Judge sides with Meta and Google, puts California child privacy law on hold

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Imagine

Getting pretty tired of these guys walking around in cowboy hats and cowboy boots. You ever see these jack-offs? Can’t we kill some of these motherfuckers? Walking around in a fucking cowboy hat. Grown men. It’s not even Halloween for christ-sakes. I say “hey Tex grow up and get yourself a wardrobe consistent with the century you’re living in”. Why do certain men feel the need to dress up as mythic figures? You don’t see anyone walking around in a pirate costume do you? When was the last guy you ran into who had on a viking outfit? Make-believe cowboys… the closest they ever got to a cow is when they stopped to take a piss at an Arby’s.

-- George Carlin

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Imagine

I think maybe you need to get your prescription checked, because you seem to be seeing words that aren't there.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Money

Money they got, in part, by harvesting personal information from young children and then selling it to anyone willing to meet their asking price. Who knows what the Chinese government has done with data exfiltrated by Bytedance. Probably something far less nefarious than the heavy breathing conspiracy theorist would imagine, but we don't really know one way or the other.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Imagine

That's a lot of words to say "Correct"

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Imagine

Let me guess. Another person who's never been within 100 miles of California, but thinks they're an expert on how the state should be run because of something a disembodied voice on AM radio said.

Facebook, TikTok, and Google's entire business models are based around harvesting personal info about people, and they've all been smacked around before because they were intentionally targeting kids. Amazon at least has a business selling stuff and is probably getting dragged along for the ride on this one.

aerogems Silver badge
Big Brother

Imagine

Imagine the chutzpah needed to sue over a law about protecting the privacy of children. Granted I'm sure it's a bit more nuanced if you look at the actual briefs from both sides, and there may well be some serious deficiencies with the law, but generally that would be a case where you would want to work with legislators to pass some new legislation that amends the original law to remedy some of those flaws, not sue to get the whole thing overturned. That just makes it seem like you want to be able to keep on harvesting PII from kids and selling it to anyone willing to meet your asking price. Which, I'm sure is exactly what Facebook, TikTok, and Google want to keep on doing. I'm sure Twitler's desperate enough for cash that he's willing to sell the info of any kids using the service. Amazon seems like an outlier, though I'm sure they see it as a threat to their voice assistant program.

As TikTok surveils staff's office hours, research indicates WFH is good for planet

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Free Haircuts

The idea behind these "perks" is a sort set of golden handcuffs. The idea isn't that different from casinos that create an environment designed to stimulate your senses and keep you from feeling tired, or how your average brick and mortar store will strategically place staple items all the way in the back of the store so you have to walk by all the other things on your way. It's all about keeping you in the office for longer periods of time than you're required to be there per your contract. While you're sitting around waiting for a haircut, maybe you decide to kill some time checking emails, as just one example.

Personally, I'm still a bit salty over how the lunch hour used to 1) actually be an hour, not 45 minutes, and 2) was paid. Used to be we worked 9am-5pm and that included an hour for lunch, now it's 9am-6pm because the lunch hour doesn't count.

aerogems Silver badge
Big Brother

How very PRC of them

For all of ByteDance's protestations that they aren't just an arm of the Chinese government... this doesn't really help their case.

This is just me, but I'd actually be less annoyed at such a policy if the execs would at least be honest about the reason. Don't get me wrong, I'd still be pissed about it, but saying it's because of "improved collaboration" or any of the other excuses given is just plain insulting to the intelligence of your workforce. At least if they gave the real reason they wouldn't be adding that last twist of the knife.

Oracle at Europe's largest council didn't foresee bankruptcy

aerogems Silver badge

Re: I feel for them

Also an interesting point. In the case of my current employer they did have some good reasons for wanting to go with SAP over their old ERP, but dear lord are some of the consultants just useless. There are at least two of them who do really know their stuff in their particular area, but they are at the higher levels. It's the basis level people who are just a disaster. I caught one of them duplicating some work scheduling profile values, which would have been perfectly fine, had they not forgotten to update the corresponding value that gets passed to another module. So, half the profile values were exactly the same despite being intended for very different parts of the overall process to build a finished product.

About two months past the "go live" date and I think the status today is they still haven't been able to make a single finished product using SAP yet. And at the end of the month the consultants all basically pack up and bugger off to the next poor sap (happy coincidence) who hired their firm.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: I feel for them

You would think, and I realize literally all evidence seems to point to the contrary, that this has been done enough corporate lawyers would have started demanding some kind of clause that the contract is not fulfilled until the client has a functional ERP, and the provider/consultant is on the hook to stick around for however long it takes, but the client will only be paying for whatever's in the contract. Making it in the interest of the consultant to have at least some competent people in key roles to make sure things keep rolling. Obviously the consultant's lawyers would balk at such a thing, but really it seems only fair. The essence of the contract is that the client pays the consultant to set them up with a shiny new ERP. The obvious assumption is that it will be functional at the end of the process. Maybe not perfect, but it should at least be self-sustaining and then the client's staffers can fine tune it. Being left with something that is less than say 80% complete, IMO (for whatever it's not worth), should be grounds for a breach of contract claim.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: I feel for them

Governments usually don't get you to voluntarily pay them for the privilege.

aerogems Silver badge
Holmes

The way I've always read them is that the council essentially went bust because of project cost overruns. Granted I'm betting it's not the ONLY cause, but it would be hard to imagine any single larger contributing factor. If this project were not so far into the red, they would have all those resources to cover the other shortfalls. I mean 80m+ pounds would go a long ways to covering all the other random unexpected expenses that may crop up.

aerogems Silver badge

IMO, you've got the order wrong.

They should sack themselves first, then they bin what they have and just work on extending what they had, and the people who fucked it up get to help out on a volunteer (i.e. unpaid) basis as part of their making it up to the taxpayers.

aerogems Silver badge

I feel for them

I'm currently working at a company in the middle of migrating to SAP from some ERP most people have probably never heard of. Saying it's been a dumpster fire would be to significantly undersell it. The thing that gets me is they paid some consulting company, who is a SAP partner, to do the setup. Again, dumpster fire doesn't begin to do it justice. Some of that can maybe be blamed on the company as with the previous ERP system they just gave everyone Admin rights and so people just made little changes here and there to get whatever they needed to pass through the system, so the data they have to load into SAP is not exactly very clean. To the company's credit, with SAP they're looking to make a clean break with bad practices of the past, but it's not going well.

Still, not all of it can be down to just the company having bad data. A lot of the Fiori tiles/apps/whatever come back with SQL errors that make it clear the consultants didn't set things up correctly, and there's a lot of other hints that the consulting company just hired a bunch of people who probably have no business doing this kind of work and tossed them into the meat grinder. What really gets me, is that the consulting company basically gets to just walk away from this whole mess at the end of the month. That's after the company extended the "hypercare" contract at least twice. Seems to me that they should be on the hook to stick around until the company has a working SAP implementation no matter how long it takes and no matter how big a bath they may take on the contract. Must be a great gig where you can come in, turn a company completely upside down, leave them in a barely functional state, and laugh all the way to the bank. FFS, they haven't (to the best of my knowledge) even handed over any kind of document describing all the changes they made to the generic image, which should be like a bog standard deliverable that should have been ready by the time the first "hypercare" period ended. I've seen no evidence to suggest such a document even exists, or that the consultants have been documenting their work at all.

So, I can empathize with the Birmingham folks. The people just looking to do their job got royally hosed by a few people who were bribed by Oracle reps into going with them. Despite the fact that it's a pretty well known fact that SAP and Oracle both deliberately make it as painful as possible to migrate away from their products. May not have been a literal bribe, like money changing hands, but no doubt they were wined and dined extensively by Oracle reps, and given all kinds of rosy predictions about how great things will be. They'll set up a demo and bring in their best people to run it, and of course those people will not be working on the actual project, instead just throw bodies at the problem in the form of people so green they need mowing who muck everything up and are then usually discarded after that client's contract is done.

Unity talks of price cap and fees for only largest games developers

aerogems Silver badge

Re: CEO John Riccitiello is a ham handed idiot

It's tempting to think there's a correlation here, but there are narrow windows during which the CEO of any publicly traded company can buy/sell shares and they typically have to file paperwork with the SEC months in advance. It doesn't preclude the possibility of some insider trading, but it'd be a lot harder to pull off than you might think. As long as he filed the paperwork with the SEC in a timely manner, they're not going to do anything. The shareholders probably wouldn't have any standing to sue over this decision, but they could, and IMO should, pressure the board to fire his ass, or start firing board members until they get people on the board willing to fire his ass. Sadly, that requires a lot of effort to track down large shareholders, many of which are probably things like mutual or pension funds, and then get a large enough bloc to really affect some change.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: the trust is gone though

I mean, some devs are going to be stuck more or less no matter what. Take Genshin Impact for example. There's basically no way they would reasonably be able to convert all that over to Unreal or any other engine without it being more trouble and expense than it's worth. However, their newer Honkai Star Rail game is still relatively new, so... I'd be shocked if there weren't internal discussions at Hoyoverse to evaluate the possibility going on right now. And if they have any unannounced games in the works, those too are probably under review.

That's where Unity has fucked itself over in an action usually seen as a last desperate attempt by failing companies to remain in business, but is becoming more and more common in late state capitalism. They've got a certain captive audience of games already written using Unity and those that are too far along to make switching feasible. However, that gale force wind you feel is all the developers rushing to evaluate other game engines for any projects that haven't crossed the rubicon yet. Unity basically sold their future profits for pennies on the dollar, or pence on the pound, today.

aerogems Silver badge
FAIL

Classic Non-Apology

We're not sorry for anything we did, only that we got caught.

Schneider Electric warns that existing datacenters aren't buff enough for AI

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Facepalm

Because of course they did!

Company that sells expensive industrial electrical equipment says people need to buy more expensive industrial electrical equipment! Other headlines from around the world: The sky is blue, and water is wet. More at eleven.

Having read the room, Unity goes back to drawing board on runtime fee policy

aerogems Silver badge

The further up you go in a company hierarchy the more restrictions there are on when you can sell stock. He probably had to file paperwork to sell it months ago.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: It's a shame, really

I'd love to be able to disagree, but I can't.

Personally, I place most of the blame on the MBA idea of making stock options part of the executive compensation package. It was a good idea, and definitely worth trying, but the experiment has clearly not just failed, but backfired spectacularly. Add to that the bullshit idea that company executives have a fiduciary duty to shareholders -- even the person who came up with this idea has since disavowed it, claiming he never intended it in the way people have come to interpret it -- and you've got the recipe for what we see today.

Top executives routinely mortgaging the company's future for profits today, and since they tend to play musical chairs every couple of years, the odds of any one of them being left holding the bag for the damage done is minimal. Even then, they likely have "golden parachute" clauses in their contracts that mean they get paid ahead of anyone else in the event the company goes bankrupt. You see things like what's going on at Salesforce, where they cut 10% of their staff claiming dire financial straits, then a mere couple of months later they announce they're going to go on a hiring binge.* It sort of reminds me of the old joke about classes you need to take to become a plumber: Showing Your Crack and Advanced Showing Your Crack.

* Bootnote: I once interviewed for a job at Salesforce. What a total shitshow. The job description I was given by the recruiter was for your basic helpdesk role (I was just starting out in my career at the time) and then apparently they decided to mash that together with like a mid-level IT security role, while paying an entry-level helpdesk role salary. For... reasons, they decided to have me talk to someone because they grew up maybe 100 miles or so from me. Not sure what that was about, but then I'm just left sitting in a conference room for for like 20-30 minutes. I was literally just about to get up and try to find my own way out when eventually the hiring manager comes back to show me out. This was also before Smartphones as we know them now, so it's not like I could just dick around on my phone while I waited, I was literally just left sitting there and the only real entertainment was watching the occasional person walk by.

aerogems Silver badge
WTF?

Re: It's a shame, really

As far back as pre-university "business" classes I took, they were harping on the idea of "sustainable competitive advantage" which is a concept that seems completely lost on business leaders of today.

The basic idea is to figure out something you do better than anyone else and make sure you keep doing it better than anyone else so customers keep coming to you. I suppose in a twisted sort of way, kicking customers in the teeth could technically qualify, though I don't imagine there's a lot of repeat business for that model, not that it seems to keep a surprising number of companies from trying.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Too little, too late

Github and the like are littered with abandoned open source projects. Maybe the dev lost interest, maybe life happened and they didn't have time to devote to it any longer, maybe they got hit by a bus and are no longer among the living. Any number of reasons could have happened. Depending on people to spend their free time to work on something that you depend on probably isn't going to be a good idea. For every Linux there's probably at least two dozen projects that blinked out of existence.

aerogems Silver badge
Windows

Re: big lesson: be ready for change.

No one ever got fired for buying IBM!

The fact that IBM owns RedHat just adds a new layer.

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Too little, too late

Depends on the license. There are a lot of different open source licenses and some of them could be written in such a way that the developer(s) in charge of the project could prevent forks and allow them to add new terms to the license. Sure, if something is under the GPLv2 and the developers suddenly decide future versions will be closed source, you can always continue on a parallel version using the GPL'd code, but that won't necessarily apply to all licenses.

Chap blew up critical equipment on his first day – but it wasn't his volt

aerogems Silver badge

Wow

Here in the States, odds are the engineers would have found some way to blame it all on the new hire assuming the boss even bothered to investigate that far. The corporate world here is all about playing hot potato when it comes to assigning blame and it's depressingly common for people to get fired from jobs for things that really weren't their fault... at least not exclusively.

Google promises eternity of updates for Chromebooks – that's a decade for everyone else

aerogems Silver badge

Re: Hardware behind the Iron Curtain

You're in luck. Microsoft seems to be slowly adopting the Unix method of hardware support: The OS just blindly sends data to the device and assumes it knows what to do with it. Things like printers and scanners having proprietary drivers that will randomly stop working one day will eventually become a thing of the past.

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