* Posts by FILE_ID.DIZ

245 publicly visible posts • joined 26 Aug 2020

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Freedom for MegaCortex ransomware victims – the fix is out

FILE_ID.DIZ
Holmes

Who gives a shit about how long an intruder was inside your network. So long as you can validate that data was not compromised, eg: they just want to steal your shit for secondary ransom. Your extended backups are generally quite valuable.

If your backups weren't valuable, why would these criminals bother fucking with your backups? I mean, time is money - crims have new targets to fuck.

US Supreme Court asked if cops can plant spy cams around homes

FILE_ID.DIZ
Boffin

Re: Those are privately owned

Correct you are, except that the police doesn't need to give that homeowner a "Ring" branded camera. The brand doesn't matter whatsoever.

In the case of Ring video, in the TOS, you grant a right to Amazon to do whatever they want with that content. They have accordingly resold that right to both private and public entities for their purposes.

Since Amazon has a right to those videos and has agreements to provide those videos to various government entities, the Fourth Amendment no longer applies. This would be no different than a security camera of a private business that recorded a crime and the Police used that video to identity the criminal and further use that video in a Court of Law.

Speaking further about cameras which a Government installs, one has to look no further than the botched surveillance of Robert Kraft (plus 30+ others) vs Palm Beach County/Jupiter Beach PD for recent, prior case history.

Terraform Labs and crypto bro Do Kwon face $57 million court case in Singapore

FILE_ID.DIZ

Re: Just Pull a Carlos Ghosn...

All correct - but there still is no extradition treaty between the two countries.

And if you're running from the law, beggars can't be choosers. I mean, look at Edward Snowden.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Devil

Just Pull a Carlos Ghosn...

... and flee to Lebanon?

You're Shipt outta luck: App sued for treating delivery workers as contractors

FILE_ID.DIZ
Boffin

Re: Surely some mistake here?

Don't forget that Visa (in the most optimal scenario) can take 2 x swipe charge and 2 x merchant surcharge for a "single" transaction.

AWS warns of demand slowdown as customers seek to cut spend

FILE_ID.DIZ
Gimp

Your statement presumes that those organizations haven't been subsumed by the lure of all those "SaaS" features that various clouds offer, "bonding" you to their cloud (using the same icon) with the fragrant (but elusive) lure of "cheaper pricing and quicker development" prospect...

Origins of mysterious marsquake settled: It was a meteoroid what done it

FILE_ID.DIZ
Trollface

Two movie references. Three if you include the porno!

Maybe the Arachnids from Star Ship Troopers were on to something - instead of sending fragile drilling probes that can't go more than a couple of inches - we should just hurdle asteroids towards Mars, we'd get a Deep(er) Impact.

Prison inmate accused of orchestrating $11M fraud using cell cellphone

FILE_ID.DIZ
Boffin

Re: Ethical search and seizure

Schools, K-12, are also a partially constitution free zone as well with respect to the First, Second, Fourth, Fifth and I'm sure a few others if I thought about it a bit more.

Germany orders Sept 1 shutdown of digital ad displays to save gas

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Up

Re: Pointless laws are pointless

If we extend indefinitely, we're going to encounter problems.

Correct you are. In loose terms, we are over-extending the designed lives of our nuclear fleet by years and years, today. And we're only able to do so because these vessels were overbuilt because, well, we're talking about nuclear FRICKING fission. You error on the side of caution on safety margins. ;)

Yes, they are being inspected and are currently deemed safe, but we're not building new ones - and this will take 10 to 15 or more years for a new crop of generators to come online.

I have to imagine that if we can apply 40 or 50 or more years of gained operational knowledge, a brand-new fission reactor will be better, cheaper and safer than ones built two generations ago that are running today - which are still supremely safe.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Facepalm

Re: Exceptions for such dual-purpose signs have been arranged.

The Uber model of pricing.

I just came back from the future, and that worked out well for everyone.

PS: Calgary is a beautiful city. Was there last year on a project for several weeks and have to say, of all the Canadian cities I've been to, Calgary appeals the most to me.

Never been to as far west as BC (Bring Cash) or as far east as Newfoundland (heard they're strange) - but will hand it to Calgary. :)

FILE_ID.DIZ
Meh

Re: Exceptions for such dual-purpose signs have been arranged.

I am always amused by gas prices and not in a good way.

I mean, yes - they need to charge relative to the price that they're going to pay the distributor, but how many delivery tankers does any one gas station receive on any given day?

I mean, does the price of the gas change while that delivery truck is in transit?

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Down

FRA airport is very nearly in compliance with this law....

About time digital adverts got the same treatment - this time for light pollution. (Although really, was it necessary to order the NUC or Pi to be powered down due to the slipshod language of the law or perhaps not tie the power of the NUC or Pi to the power of the physical signage?)

For the last two or more decades, as homes around FRA encroached the airport (used to be nothing but fields nearby), eventually I suppose those homeowners forgot the reason why the land around the airport was cheap in the first place and started bitching that "hey, FRA is loud - let's shut it down" and the local government acquiesced.

Accordingly, with the exception of emergencies, FRA has been shut to all flights between 11PM and 5AM local for over a decade.

Of course - this is when freighters (think FedEx/UPS/AtlasAir/AmazonAir/DHL etc) typically perform their movements and FRA was Germany's most important international freight hub.

T-Mobile US and SpaceX hope to deliver phone service from space

FILE_ID.DIZ
Stop

Re: Really?

Presentation? I read the article. Either the article was lacking or you got hooked by the marketing wanks.

The very first paragraph of the article states -

"T-Mobile US and SpaceX have announced plans to use satellites in low Earth orbit [...] and perhaps globally using existing devices." Emphasis mine.

Who cares about the frequency or protocol. If it is phone is communicating with a satellite, then it is verboten in China.

Just like if you rent an Iridium phone, it does not work in Cuba, or Russia, or Afghanistan, or North Korea or in any other sanctioned countries. Or in countries like China where such technology is forbidden by local law.

Clearly it cannot be used anywhere in the world.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Down

Re: Really?

no dead zones anywhere in the world...

This is demonstrable false.

China, for example, forbids all satellite phones in their country. There are other countries that do as well, but China is by far the largest.

If the company that sends you the bill is US based, or banks in the US, then they have to abide by our sanctioned destination lists, so no Cuba, no North Korea, no Russia.

California to phase out internal combustion vehicles by 2035

FILE_ID.DIZ
Happy

Re: Not going to happen

Well, it is also a culture that the locals enthusiastically support as well.

Sure, the locals may have been/are drawn by the lack of automobiles, similar to how those who are "allergic to EMF" are drawn to the National Radio Quiet Zone, so there may be a bit of bias.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Down

Re: Not going to happen

That's not entirely true.

Case in point, Mackinac Island.

Vehicles are prohibited on the island... unless you happen to be a former Vice President of the United States... and his caravan.

How Google uses mirrors to dynamically reconfigure its networks

FILE_ID.DIZ
Holmes

A common fiber bundle size is 144. Perhaps 136 is used for production, the remainder is for spares or used in out-of-plane management comms?

No real clue, however... just a guess.

Network congestion algorithms have design flaw, says MIT

FILE_ID.DIZ

Unless you operate a RFC 1072 compliant network, otherwise known as LFP, or Long, Fat Pipe. They are inherently subpar to lab real results.

W3C's planned transition to HTTPS stymied by legacy laggards

FILE_ID.DIZ

Re: Wellnhofer is incoherent

Wellnhofer indicates that https is a performance hill too high to be fought, so if you need something over "a network", load it locally[0] or don't load it at all.

I don't disagree.

[0] Locality is relative to the speaker.

Dutch authorities arrest 29-year-old dev with suspected ties to Tornado Cash

FILE_ID.DIZ

How many transactions have you concluded in any currency, real or virtual with an unknown entity on the other side of the world in a sanctioned country?

I can't think of a single instance in all my years where I have done that or believed it was necessary to do so.

Also, I'm not sure on what you mean by "person you do not know". Know in what sense of the word? I mean, I'd have to "know" the person's wallet address in order to send BTC. I'd also have to "know" the person or entity well enough to trust that I will receive value for the currency I transfer.

Furthermore, if the entity on the other end of that transaction resides (your example) in a sanctioned country, that transaction is illegal, period. Whether that transaction is concluded in BTC, dollars, bars of gold or crates of seashells matters not.

I'm tired of these strange hypothetical use-cases for cryptocurrencies. No one regularly sends funds in any form to individuals or businesses in sanctioned countries on the other side of the globe, except to pay for a decryption key if they got crypto'd and didn't have backups or have them sufficiently air-gapped.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Down

Re: Blatant double standard from reg users

With respect to ETH or BTC, there is literally no privacy on those blockchains. Everything is recorded forever, for any to inspect.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Down

Tumblers seem to be a solution in search of a problem. Clearly those who play on the blockchain knew what they were signing up for, an indelible ledger system.

Or wait a minute... perhaps blockchain currency users are trying to invent a new anonymous method of currency transactions? But that problem has been solved for centuries with the physical transfer of fiat currency and/or fungible metals. I'm so confused now.

Blockchain "currencies" seems to be experiencing its penet remailer period.

Intel experiences another kind of meltdown

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Up

Get back to processors...

...and out of all these distractions, so good on Intel.

Also helps that the new(ish) CEO of Intel is a CPU guy - he was the lead architect on the Intel 486 CPU for example.

US net neutrality bill is only two pages long. And that's potentially a good thing

FILE_ID.DIZ
Holmes

Just because a bill is light on words....

...doesn't mean it won't be heavily despised.

For example, Section 230(c)(1) of the Communications Decency Act, also written by Sen. Wyden, is only 26 words long.

Don't dive head first into that crypto pool, FBI warns

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Up

I love reading Web3IsGoingGreat.com. (That link is NoScript friendly, btw)

Is the $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope worth the price tag?

FILE_ID.DIZ
Alien

Re: And the answer to the question is

A simple example is our exploration of Mars.

The first probes were crude and expensive, relative to their scientific output (in hindsight, of course). We've now sent dozens of probes, each costing less than the former and most (if not all) lasting magnitudes longer than their designed lifespan.

FILE_ID.DIZ

Re: And the answer to the question is

No truer words written.

Sure, Hubble was repaired and up until the last decade, reparable.... but it no longer is.

Just as this new telescope.

Imagine what would happen of a bean counter came in and said... "oh, why do we care if something is off by 10 nanometers".

Intel takes deep dive into immersion cooling with GRC

FILE_ID.DIZ

Cynic in me

Intel breaths a sigh of relief - No longer are their crappy engineers constrained by the thermal interface known as "air".

Bill for US telcos to bin Chinese kit blows out by $3 billion

FILE_ID.DIZ
Meh

As all things politics - the true cost is never initially disclosed.

North Koreans spotted harassing SMBs with malware

FILE_ID.DIZ
Trollface

Would you really want to provide a communications path to one of these criminals so that you may receive their source code, aka payload?

Or maybe you let that lesser infraction slide.

Meet Mantis – the tiny shrimp that launched 3,000 DDoS attacks

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Up

Re: Related

Thumbs up for The Oatmeal link.

Their infographic was the first thing that popped in my mind when I was read the word "Mantis" in this article and thought of murder sticks.

Microsoft's July Patch Tuesday fixes actively exploited bug

FILE_ID.DIZ
FAIL

Re: "usually a specially crafted Office or Adobe document"

Well, the crims have thought about that.

So, they break into someone's mailbox who you know, well because they didn't know that rule, and then email you a hot load.

And in the words of that Faberge Organics ad... And they'll tell their friends- and so on, and so on

All attachments should be suspect. Period.

FBI and MI5 bosses: China cheats and steals at massive scale

FILE_ID.DIZ

Re: "painting China as a threat with false accusations"

China, like all the super powers, states anytime they get caught red-handed, that the accusations are false, so no surprise here. (That same doubt should be assumed for your home country's statements.)

However, it is known that these tears from Chinese officials are really crocodile tears. China still gets third-world shipping cost preferences due to UPU (Universal Postal Union) rulings, but they're literally the second biggest economy in the world today (by a considerable margin).

While what I posit may represent a tenuous relationship between shipping costs and espionage, I see that China has no problem still trying to paint themselves as some agrarian Nation, which they are clearly not (anymore).

FILE_ID.DIZ
FAIL

Re: S IP mple gix

I disagree with your oversimplification of the problem. Much (but not all) of this data isn't "on the internet". It is protected by firewalls. However, if an employee (or other account with appropriate access) is breached, then data can be 'exfiltrated' via the internet.

I'm sure that companies like Boeing aren't hanging QNAP's on the internet...

And that exception "but not all" has to deal with email. There is a lot of sensitive data that we pass through email and is stored in our inbox and sent box that's hanging off the internet for any opportunistic hacker.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Holmes

Re: S IP mple gix

Well - that's simple to say. Way less simple to implement.

Even considerably locked down systems, such as some Federal Court electronic filing and case management system were breached via the monitoring tools used to maintain its uptime. [0] These are systems designed to handle court sealed documents, which is just about as close to "Top Secret" as you can get in the civilian side of the world.

I'm sure they did their due diligence. However, security is always a cat and mouse game and the crims only have to get lucky once and the company (or court) has to always get it right.

[0] - https://krebsonsecurity.com/2021/01/sealed-u-s-court-records-exposed-in-solarwinds-breach/

US weather forecasters triple supercomputing oomph with latest machines

FILE_ID.DIZ
Happy

Re: Low tech.

I recall the "Weather Rock".

If the rock is wet, it's raining.

If the rock is swinging, the wind is blowing.

If the rock casts a shadow, the sun is shining.

If the rock does not cast a shadow and is not wet, the sky is cloudy.

If the rock is difficult to see, it is foggy.

If the rock is white, it is snowing.

If the rock is coated with ice, there is a frost.

If the ice is thick, it's a heavy frost.

If the rock is bouncing, there is an earthquake.

If the rock is under water, there is a flood.

If the rock is warm, it is sunny.

If the rock is missing, there was a tornado.

If the rock is wet and swinging violently, there is a hurricane.

If the rock can be felt but not seen, it is night time.

If the rock has white splats on it, watch out for birds.

If there are two rocks, stop drinking, you are drunk.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Facepalm

I don't think weather forecasting has gotten much better in the past forty years.

Perhaps with the prediction and accuracy of tornadoes? But run-of-the-mill temperature, precipitation chance, humidity, wind - not much seems to have changed and that's not saying a whole lot.

Still loved it when I was in Los Angeles several years back and the local news channels were all advertising that they had the most powerful Doppler radar in the area. Can't find the commercial, but here's LA ABC7's Mega Doppler 7000 HD page... eyes rolling. (It's stated in the title of the page.)

Oh, and by the way - Los Angeles receives on average 14 inches of rain a year, with 92% of that coming during the rainy season (November to April). Big whoop. [0].

[0] - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_of_Los_Angeles

Google said to be taking steps to keep political campaign emails out of Gmail spam bin

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Up

Re: Seen this poo before

That's a fantastic idea. I usually stick with the NPA-NXX of my areacode and 555... but some places are starting to scrub for the now considerably more limited 555 NXX range.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Trollface

Re: Seen this poo before

So... guess you probably don't vote for many races then eh? Maybe someone going for a water district seat and a judge or two? :)

That was my grave mistake... giving my real phone number on my voter registration. That changed when I moved and needed to update my registration. Hopefully that updated record will start making its way through their databases, wiping out my real number with the bogus one.

If fact, I didn't find out that governments sell these lists to anyone who can pony up the change. (They're not that expensive.) And I figured that out about 10-12 years ago when I gave a dedicated email address on my voter registration form and once the spam started spilling in, did some research and found that out.

China's blockchain boosters slam crypto as Ponzi scheme

FILE_ID.DIZ
Devil

Re: "Blockchains have a useful purpose outside of crypto."

Smart Contracts... Yea, that's working out well for the crypto industry today. Lots of crypto companies are losing their shirts because they have "bugs" in contracts. Should have been called dumb contracts.

Also, do you really want to cite something from IBM towards this audience?

FILE_ID.DIZ
Pirate

Re: Ponzi scheme?

Where do you think the $$$ *trillions* in claimed value exists? Even the "stable coins" are simply backed themselves by crypto ponzi. An extra layer of obsfucation, that ultimately lets them claimed the assets are "stable" and "backed by assets". Perhaps one of those assets is even "Genopets KI"!.

There are (generally) two classes of stable coins today. There is the fiat-based stable coins who are supposedly backed by real currency. Maybe a fraction thereof, or 100% backed. I somehow doubt the latter. Then there is this new class of stable coins, algorithmic (algo) coins, which are backed by another crypto. They're supposed to be the Holy Grail of crypto in that if the thought-experiment works, then crypto can finally break free from its dependency from fiat currency.

I really don't understand much of the latter group, and to be sure - much of the turmoil in the crypto world - the last 6-8 weeks is around the algo stable coin collapse of Terra and a few hedge funds like Three Arrows Capital who then backed even more risky crypto ventures are collapsing. Plus, it seems that crypto begets crypto. Looks like a lot of crypto bought a lot of other crypto - especially Terra and as these crypto companies continue to unwind their Terra losses, it's squeezing these firm's ability to maintain liquidity. And it doesn't help that ETH and BTC have tanked at the same time.

All of that is feeding into a more general run on crypto right now.

It also doesn't help that there seem to be a decent amount of people who seem to have very little knowledge in what they're investing in, are putting too much of their money into this class of "investments" and losing their shirt in the process.

And seriously - what the fuck is with "smart contracts" and "oracle" issues? If the contract was so smart, how are flash loans a thing. And if an oracle is supposed to know all and see all, why are some cryptos hard-coding them to $1 Terra and then getting absolutely fucked when it depegged?

And finally, yield farming... literally on a Bloomberg interview for an Oddlots podcast in April, Sam Bankman-Fried described yield farming exactly in the terms of a ponzi scheme.

I will admin, I own 50 doge. I'll probably never see that money, but who knows.

I also (somehow) managed to buy about $50US Dollars worth of BTC last year within a few hundreds of its peak. I still toss in a few bucks twice a month just to see what happens.

But my exposures to crypto are minimal. A rounding error to zero in my grand scheme of investments.

The perfect crime – undone by the perfect email backups

FILE_ID.DIZ
Boffin

Re: Manager and Cashier

I don't know - $2M in a decent currency and you can live off the interest alone.

3.5% = $71K

5.5% = $112K

7.5% = $155K

9.5% = $198K

Microsoft revises software licensing, cloud policies amid EU regulator scrutiny

FILE_ID.DIZ

Re: One can dream

- Bundle teams with office to try to kill competing products like slack, zoom

What does that have to do with licensing Windows Server on your own hardware?

- Removed MSDN rights from customers who use any cloud other than Azure

What does that have to do with licensing Windows Server on your own hardware?

- Require customers to ditch on-prem Windows licences and pay for new ones in the cloud, except for Azure

Have they, really? Are you stating that it is now impossible to buy Windows Server OS licenses for physical servers?

- Remove the rights from customers to take office to the cloud, except in Azure

What does that have to do with licensing Windows Server on your own hardware?

- Make customers pay for VDA licences in the cloud, except for Azure

What does that have to do with licensing Windows Server on your own hardware?

- Make Cloud providers sell MSFT software through a separate type of licence (SPLA) which increases in cost every year

What does that have to do with licensing Windows Server on your own hardware?

- Go on a concerted effort to convert older licences (that can be brought to other clouds) to subscription licencing which cant be taken to the cloud (accept Azure) - Msft is being sued by Value licencing for this.

What does that have to do with licensing Windows Server on your own hardware?

- Remove the bring your own licence option for competing SQL PaaS services on other clouds (amazon RDS)

What does that have to do with licensing Windows Server on your own hardware?

Seems that you are conflating competition between cloud providers using another vendor's application with licensing the same vendor's application on your own hardware.

Sure - microsoft v any other random cloud provider isn't a friendly relationship - however - you, as your own company/user, are still free to purchase Microsoft server licensing and run that on your own hardware.

You need to do your own CBA. If running on your own hardware isn't possible, for whatever reason(s), then you should entertain the next best solution. If that next best solution isn't the cheapest - then you need to take a secondary analysis and determine why the next best solution that is the cheapest, isn't the best. At the conclusion, you will have arrived at the what and why the solution chosen, is the best for you.

FILE_ID.DIZ
WTF?

Re: One can dream

What does any of that have to do with the 8 core, 2 proc minimum license requirements the OP complained about?

Stay on topic. Or start a new thread if you must.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Boffin

Re: One can dream

In your edge-case example, you're talking about an $500 loss. Given the price of DRAM these days, licensing is a drop in the bucket these days, if you're buying OE DRAM, at least.

Hell, do yourself a favor and buy that second 8-core processor. You'll thank yourself in 2-3 years time. Plus, I presume you're at least taking advantage of the two vOSE licenses and not running bare-metal?

Furthermore - Windows Server Standard cost has been going down over the years. For example, if I use the CPI Inflation Calculator [0] and input the MSRP price of Windows Server Standard 2008 (not a two-processor, eight-core per proc minimum license) of $999, I get (rounded up a tad) about $1,375. Far cheaper than the MSRP of $1,069 today.

Sure, back then 2008 Standard supported four CPU... but do you really want to compare the bees knees of 2008 versus 2022? I think the 5315Y, 6334, 8356H or 4309Y 8-core procs today will eat all the Xeon DP lunches, and consume less power to boot.

Taking a look at most of the processors around 2007/8 (at the time when 2008 Server came out), all the Xeon DP had 2 to 4 cores per processor. The 4 socket processor, Xeon MP series, were two to four to six cores each.

I don't recall at the moment, but when Microsoft transitioned Server Standard to the two proc/eight core minimum, they priced that at the same cost of the prior version of Windows Server Standard in a "typical" CPU/core count.

So, your single proc, eight core server today would basically have costed the same "back in the day" license-wise, but with a single CPU purchased.

TL;DR: Your post holds no water.

[0]https://www.bls.gov/data/inflation_calculator.htm

Musk repeats threat to end $46.5bn Twitter deal – with lawyers, not just tweets

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Down

Re: HPE

No - this is the act of a man-child who is inconvenienced by the very dense and negotiated merger agreement he accepted.

All of this bitching should have been done in private, prior to the public announcement of the purchase of Twatter. It is the very nature of his public discourse that contributed to both Twatter and Tesla to tank in the past few weeks.

You don't agree to buy a company without kicking the tires. And since this is a publicly listed company (twatter), all that tire kicking is done privately - well before announcing that you're going to buy the company.

It used to be said that while President, Trump should to have his phone taken away from him from time to time because of his stupid twatter posts. The same recommendation applies to the Musky One. He needs to get off Twatter while discussing his purchase of Twatter. Anything less than a complete blackout is only hurting both Twatter... and Tesla.

He's a jackass and a man-child.

Salesforce staff back an end to its relationship with NRA

FILE_ID.DIZ
Holmes

Re: How do we protect our 2nd amendment & our kids at the same time?

The 2nd Amendment is 27 words long. Given the wide-range that the US Constitution has been interpreted throughout the centuries - there will be differing opinions on what it (the Constitution) means.

As an example - Roe v Wade was a 7-2 decision. The (last) decision on concealed carry was just 5-4, McDonald v. City of Chicago.

Supreme Court urged to halt 'unconstitutional' Texas content-no-moderation law

FILE_ID.DIZ
Facepalm

Re: The first amendment also limits companies.

I think that you're conflating justice and money. There probably aren't too many (if any at all) wealthy people put death in the past 100 years in the US.

For example, Robert Kraft (owner of the New England Patriots and a bunch of other shit, but a billionaire none the less) beat out a rub and tug charge (prostitution) he was alleged to have committed at a massage parlor in 2019. His high-priced lawyers were able to get the video (the only evidence) tossed on a violation of privacy claim. The cameras were installed by the Government, which was the crux of the matter. I'm going to go out on a limb and assume that most, if not all of the remaining 20-something people also caught by the same video and charged with the same crime, did not have have the same financial wherewithal to challenge the prosecution all the way through to the Appeals Court like Kraft did.

The fact that the prosecution decided not to take the case to the Supreme Court after losing their appeal was due to, quote, "broader, negative implications" on future law enforcement investigations beyond the Kraft case. It was likely due to the fact that Kraft has the money to fight for his freedom all the way to the bloody end.

TL;DR - The Government knew they fucked up royally in their "sneak and peak" warrant (a holdover of the Patriot Act) - however, instead of catching a bunch of small fry, the Government accidentally caught a big fish and that fish could have capsized the Government's continued ability to surveil people if they pushed the case any further - simply because Robert Kraft has the financial largess to fight even simple prostitution charges to the bitter end.

Our courts provide the best justice money can buy. Sadly, most individuals can't afford the justice that a corporation can.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Thumb Down

Re: The first amendment also limits companies.

That is demonstrably false.

The 14th amendment has been interpreted to grant "personhood" to companies. See Northwestern National Life Insurance Co. v. Riggs with the first of many examples.

Some might consider the crescendo being Citizens United v FEC.

FILE_ID.DIZ
Devil

Or perhaps this could be just what the doctor ordered - the death of social media as we know it?

An interesting analysis of this topic I read elsewhere was that if this law passed, it is highly likely that advertisers would flee in droves from social media because many brands do not want their ads next to toxic drivel.

Fewer ads means less revenue. Less revenue means, well, less revenue. Fecesbook profit margins are down 8% over the past four quarters. Twitter is looking at a massively leveraged buyout that has been estimated to saddle them with interest-alone payment somewhere between 700M and 1B per year. Not great for a company that brought in $5B in revenue (not profit) in 2021 and with no real great way currently of monetizing their user base currently.

Social media may allow people in far flung reaches of the world or just down the street to keep in touch. But as a society I think we've done well enough over the centuries before their kind.

Perhaps these laws should be embraced? As in the first E in EEE. (Embrace, Extend, and Extinguish)

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