* Posts by AlanSh

46 posts • joined 21 Jul 2020

Solar System's fastest-orbiting asteroid spotted, flies closer to the Sun than Mercury

AlanSh

How fast is fast?

But how fast is it actually going? I'd like to know.

Since it's the only way to differentiate in a Chromium-dominated market, Vivaldi 4.1 introduces 'Accordion' tabs

AlanSh

I was a Vivaldi user

I've gone back to Firefox. Vivaldi was dropping network packets somewhere (seen by the request for a page never completing) and had issues with username and password completion on several sites (reported to Vivaldi).

NASA fixes Hubble Space Telescope using backup power supply unit, payload computer

AlanSh

What happens next time

Do they have more spares?

And my fanciful mind envisages a robot pulling a spare PSU from a drawer and plugging it in. How did they really do the swap?

Alan

Revealed: Perfect timings for creation of exemplary full English breakfast

AlanSh

Grilled mushrooms? I don't think so

Best way to do mushrooms is slice them (thickly) and then to saute them with a little butter in a pan. Do it early on in the cooking process and they will then cook themselves in their own juices. They are lovely.

New mystery AWS product 'Infinidash' goes viral — despite being entirely fictional

AlanSh

Been there - done that, Got the tee shirt.

I can confirm that I have 12 years experience in InfiniDash - going from 2025 when I first started using it to 2037 when I had to stop due to my time constant restarting again (Damn Unix again).

TCP alternative QUIC reaches IETF's Standards Track after eight years of evolution

AlanSh

Re: 12 year loop

Staff hangovers? Love it.

Oh Lord, won't you buy me a Mercedes-Benz? Detroit waits for my order, you'd better make amends

AlanSh

Re: Sometimes though....

https://www.soundjay.com/dial-up-modem-sound-effect.html

BlackBerry says it’s virtualised macOS for M1 on an x86 CPU

AlanSh
Happy

It's easier if

you just go and buy an M1 Mac - keep the installation kit handy for when you blow it up

NHS App gets go-ahead for vaccine passport use despite protest from privacy groups

AlanSh

It's here now

I've loaded the NHS app as I was already registered for patient access. My medical record already shows the two jabs I have had with dates and the vaccine type.

I have no hesitation in showing this on my phone to who ever wants it. I can't see that it erodes my privacy any further than it already is.

Alan

OVH outlines three-point 'hyper resilience' plan after Strasbourg fire

AlanSh

It's not that hard

I used to design data centres and do DC migrations for a living. It's not that hard to ensure that no data is ever lost. I'd be interested to see what they are going to and how it differs from what they had before.

Pega set to launch 'context-aware' APIs that let users tweak back-end processes without breaking front end

AlanSh

Context Aware?

Wasn't that called Object Oriented programming in the old days?

Terminal trickery, or how to improve a novel immeasurably

AlanSh

I had to do this for real once

Some time ago, I was in the oil surveying business and we had a great product which could show where oil wells had been drilled (they don't just go straight down. We had a trade show in Bahrein and got our computers transported so we could show off our wares. Of course, the main computer got dropped off a lorry and the cards went straight through the backplane (Data General Nova 3 - I said it was a long time ago!).

So I spent 2 very long nights connecting the VDU up to something that could manipulate it ( think I went and bought an Amstrad thingy from a local store - but it was a long time ago and memory fades) to show off what the results would look like on the screen plus some lovely exploding flowers and suchlike to draw the customers in. It seemed to work and we did get a few nice orders from it.

Alan

Salesman who helped land Veritas UK's 'largest ever' deal was lawfully docked £275k in commission, says judge

AlanSh

How much?

Given his base salary and bonus's, I'm not weeping too hard for him

Satellite collision anticipated by EU space agency fails to materialize... for now at least

AlanSh

Dyson will do it

Just give the problem to Dyson. They will sort it.

Alan

For blinkenlights sake.... RTFM! Yes. Read The Front of the Machine

AlanSh

Re: Hummmmmmmmm.....

Ah, Adultery. I do remember one of our people having to hide under a bed for a night before he could be flown out the next morning. Why? Because he's been dallying with a local chief's wife and the chief and his henchmen were looking for blood.

AlanSh

Re: Hummmmmmmmm.....

Ah, Sarawak. I had to visit over there a few times - Shell had The Panaga Club which was a nice drinking hole too (and served the largest prawns I have ever seen).

One day I will regale you with my story about getting out of there in the monsoon season. But not yet :)

Alan

AlanSh

Re: Hummmmmmmmm.....

No, I'm sorry, but when I was there (yes, I am the "Andrew"), it was not dry. At least, not for the ex-pats.

We also had a "club" you joined called the ditch diggers - you got into it if, when driving home from the last round of alcohol induced party, your car/truck went into a ditch. It had quite a few members.

Trustify CEO gets eight years for lying to investors, spending millions on homes, private jets, sports tickets

AlanSh

How is he going to pay that back?

Personally, I wouldn't have a clue how to find over $18m to pay the court fine. How do they expect him to do that? Or is it different over there?

Diary of a report writer and his big break into bad business

AlanSh

I get this all the time

I know Word. I know English grammar. I was trained it it. I used to teach it!

But the parent organisation I "work" for (I'm a volunteer), consistently send me documents that I have to send out with paragraph errors, spelling errors, pagination issues and so on - oh and it's always a PDF so I can't (in theory) mess with it. Of course, I can and I do. And send them back a Word and PDF corrected version.

Then an email comes out "We found a couple of typos - here's an updated version". No mentions or thank you's. And the never ask me to proof read these things before they come out.

OK - moan mode off.

What could be worse than killing a golden goose? Killing someone else's golden goose

AlanSh

I know

exactly which bank it is, having done work for them in the past (and have them steal it and claim it as theirs)- and no, I am not going to reveal which one it is.

Ministry of Defence tells contractors not to answer certain UK census questions over security fears

AlanSh

When I got my nuclear clearance I was told I was not allowed to travel to certain countries as "they knew who had that clearance". I wonder where they found that information and whether census information is more or less secure than knowing who has restricted access clearance.

Alan

PS -for any Chinese spies, I don't have it any more

Got a need for speed? New report claims iPhone 12's 5G performance lags behind that of rival Android models

AlanSh

Not sure where they get the numbers from in the report

What are those numbers? They don't say. So, it could be Mbits/sec, Mbytes/sec or indeed shoesteps per kilometre. Who knows.

What it means is that I have no way of knowing if the number for MY phone (a OnePlus 8) bears any relation to the numbers they are showing.

So, for me, a useless report as I cannot put it into any sort of context apart from being relative to another phone.

Alan

Microsoft lines its UserVoice forums up against the wall, readies firing squad of '1st party solutions'

AlanSh

Will it make any difference?

Many years ago (well if feels that long) I was part of the Insider group. My comments seemed to go straight into the great bit bucket in the sky. So, I gave up.

MS do their own thing - and you either accept it or get off their bandwagon.

Such is life these days.

Alan

VMware devolves hyperconverged infrastructure – compute nodes without storage are now a thing

AlanSh

Really? This is news?

This is the infrastructure we had 10 years ago. Compute nodes and shared storage.

Alan

European Commission redacts AstraZeneca vaccine contract – but forgets to wipe the bookmarks tab

AlanSh
Happy

Re: Clearly states the first batch is manufactured in EU, not UK

"Reasonable endeavours" - that wonderful get out clause.

SO the EU has "Reasonable endeavours". Meanwhile, the UK contract (which we haven't seen) probably says they will buy the first 100M doses off the production line (or something similar).

Transcribe-my-thoughts app would prevent everyone knowing what I actually said during meetings

AlanSh

That list

Is perfect for a future BOFH episode.

Takes from the taxpayer, gives to the old – by squishing a bug in Thatcherite benefits system

AlanSh

I had a Y2K bugged program

Back in the mid 90's I wrote a bulk delete program for a company I was consulting with. You could delete anything older than a certain date as one of the options.

I left them in the late 90's. As Y2K came around I just did a quick check. Big oops. Yes, 2 date formatting was rife in it. So, an emergency call to the company IT manager (who was new and didn't know me) to ask him to please delete the program quickly as it could have unintended consequences....

Shortly after that, the company went into financial troubles. I assume it wasn't my fault

Alan

'We're storing how this material should behave': Boffins' 3cm 'm-bit' cubes demonstrate programmable wunderstuff

AlanSh

Well, maybe?

Malleable hardware. Hardens upon impact.

Dropbox basically decimates workforce, COO logs off: Cloud biz promises to be 'more efficient and nimble'

AlanSh

I use Synology now

All I ever needed was to share files with various people and to get pictures from my phone to my PC as I took them. DB was ideal for that (and still is). But their interface sucks and I am very limited in what I can upload and the picture syncing is so flaky it's untrue.

Now I have my NAS Synology boxes with terabytes of free space and can do everything for me. Shame, DB was brilliant in the early days, but it's been overtaken.

Microsoft emits 83 security fixes – and miscreants are already exploiting one of the vulns in Windows Defender

AlanSh

Still making the same mistakes?

I am unclear why the brand new EDGE browser has so many issues. Didn't MS learn anything about coding as they built this NEW app?

Or did they give the build to the local office boy fresh out of Tandys?

NHS COVID-19 app is trying to tell Android users something but buggy notification appears stuck on 'Loading...' screen

AlanSh

Force stop worked for me

Mine started after the latest android update this morning.

I did a force stop and restarted the app- the loading came up for about 5 seconds and then went away.

Running Android 11 on a OnePlus 8.

Alan

ZIP folders were originally a Microsoft engineer's side hustle until bosses figured out he worked for Microsoft

AlanSh

I did that too with DEC

In around 1990, I wrote a text edit/word processor called EasyEdit. It was really good (I have magazine reviews that said that) and I sold it as shareware after getting permission from DEC that it was OK to do so. I also sold site licenses - and one of them was to DEC. If only they'd realised (he he). It kept me in computer upgrades and climbing equipment.

Alan

Unauthorised RAC staffer harvested customer details then sold them to accident claims management company

AlanSh

Me too

I had an accident 4 years ago that really wasn't my fault (lady ran into the back of my new car). I get one call about every 3 weeks asking the same question. I have no idea how to stop this, so now I just ask "which one - I've had so many".

Alan

Developers! These 3 weird tricks will make you a global hero

AlanSh

MS Windows started this

That was a huge benefit to the users running Windows (other window managers still exist). The "File" menu was in the same place. Cut and Paste worked the same over all apps. Etc.

Alan

My website has raised its anchor and set sail into the internet oceans without me

AlanSh

Me too

I managed a motorcycle web site for years before the hosting company (Fasthosts) got around to telling me they'd closed the server down as it was running NT4 in a corner and they'd forgotten to see if anyone was actually using it. Which was very nice of them. They gave me an 'opportunity' to move to a much more expensive solution. I decided not to accept that (funny that).

Alan

As UK breaks away from Europe, Facebook tells Brits: You'll all be Californians soon

AlanSh

It's a fait accompli situation.

I somehow feel that FB, Google etc. don't actually care that the UK still abides by EU GDPR rules. They see that we have come out of the EU and therefore all our data is up fro grabs. Boris & Co haven't realised that they are doing this (and probably don't give a damn) so our data will move.

What does my neighbour's Tesla have in common with a stairlift?

AlanSh

I think I'll wait a while

In 2029 (assuming I am still around and compos mentis) I intend to buy a Diesel SUV with a 600+ mile range (like I have today) and run it for 10 years. By 2039, I would hope EV's are cheaper than today and can recharge in 10 minutes or less and go 500+ miles between charges. Until then, I will wait.

Alan

A 1970s magic trick: Take a card, any card, out of the deck and watch the IBM System/370 plunge into a death spiral

AlanSh
FAIL

Dubug by removing lines of code???? I do hope he's not doing anything serious now.

Zoom records another bumper quarter as pandemic rumbles on, but Wall Street types quiz execs on how long it can last

AlanSh

I've used Teams and Zoom and Zoom is by far the easier to manage and work with.

Alan

Arm at 30: From Cambridge to the world, one plucky British startup changed everything

AlanSh

Re: 70 floppies, that was a big distribution

I sat back for a while - the 42nd floppy failed and I had to go back to Newmarket and get another distribution set. But they were very good about it all.

No option for TK50 then.

Alan

AlanSh

I remember installing a Microvax at Acorn back in 1986 using 70 floppies to load the O/S. They had a great culture, even back then.

AMD performance plummets when relying on battery power, says Intel. Let's take a closer look at those stats

AlanSh

Passparm test show it's true - but so what.

I ran the passmark CPU tests on my HP Envy laptop which has an AMD Ryzen 7 4700U in it.

With mains on, I got 13923. WIth just battery, I got 10252. So, yes, there is a difference.

However, in reality, I don't notice any difference apart from, when I ran the tests, the fan wasn't running as fast on battery power (indicating the CPU wasn't getting as hot).

Alan

Bloated middle age beckons: Windows 1.0 turns 35 and is dealing with its mid-life crisis, just about

AlanSh

It wasn't the best at the time.

I bought it when it came out - along with GEM and something called DoubleDos. Windows 1.0 was number 3 in popularity for me - but even then, I could see the writing on the wall.

I also remember buying Oracle v1 for DOS - not a patch on Paradox (which came a little later).

HTTPS-only mode arrives in Firefox 83 as Mozilla finds new home for Rust-y Servo engine

AlanSh

Doesn't work all the time

I just tried it on my Synology server - Firefox just flashes and restarts. HTTPS is enabled and is my normal usage mode. But there's obviously some coflict somewhere.

OnePlus 8T: Solid performance and a great screen make this 5G sub-flagship a delight

AlanSh

Re: Fingerprint Reader

I have the OnePlus 8 with the fingerprint reader under the screen. It works very well. I use my thumb as that is what seems natural.

It's a damn sight better than the one on my HP Envy PC. That is rubbish.

Brit telcos deliberately killed Phones 4u, claim admins in £1bn UK High Court sueball

AlanSh

How old?

2014 - does anyone still have phones from 6 years ago that can be handed over 'for forensic analysis'?

Alan

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