* Posts by Hubert Cumberdale

204 posts • joined 4 Sep 2019

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Oppo Find X2 Neo: We're not getting any slimmer through lockdown, but phones are

Hubert Cumberdale

Hmm.

No microSD card slot = no sale.

USA decides to cleanse local networks of anything Chinese under new five-point national data security plan

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: R.I.P. Synology

Wow. I haven't had a Synology product for years, but they would've been my go-to for a NAS, because I've found them to be great in the past. But I think if I need a NAS in future, I might just be using a stripped-down Linux box instead...

Network sniffers find COVID-19 did not break the internet – though it was behind a massive jump in outages

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Despite fewer outages overall

Very true. I've given up on Virgin for just that reason. I don't need 100Mbit: I've got FTTC that's rock solid at 36Mbit, and it's actually much better.

You think the UK coronavirus outbreak was bad? Just wait till winter: Study shows test-and-trace system is failing

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Really?

No offence, but your comment makes you sound like a c*nt.

Hubert Cumberdale

But... but...

... it's world beating I tell you!

It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas: Fondleslab sales shoot up to festive season levels as folk work from home

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Working from home? I wonder

Quite. I'm not sure exactly what useful work people can do on a tablet (aside from having video meetings). Unless they attach a keyboard to it. At which point it becomes an expensive and generally inconvenient laptop.

The Last of Us Part II: Never mind the Metacritic nonsense, Naughty Dog's ultra-violent odyssey is a must-play*

Hubert Cumberdale

Main thing that pisses me off?

The fact that there's no PC version of either.

Hubert Cumberdale

The Matrix sequels? What are you talking about? If they had ever made sequels (which they didn't) then I'm afraid I would have to deny their existence.

Amazon gets green-light to blow $10bn on 3,000+ internet satellites. All so Americans can shop more on Amazon

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: "finalization of its space station design"

That's no moon...

First rule of Ransomware Club is do not pay the ransom, but it looks like Carlson Wagonlit Travel didn't get the memo

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Crikey

Thumbs down? Really? I'm not saying I have no sympathy, but I've lost count of the number of times someone has come to me saying that their computer has "died" and could I get their data back please? Are you giving thumbs down to the use of decent backup solutions, or to my apparent lack of sympathy? If someone is hit by a drunk driver and dies simply because they weren't wearing a seat belt, then it's still a tragedy. But they were still being stupid.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: You get what you pay for

You have chosen... poorly.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Crikey

Yes, but they shouldn't be able to go after your backups if you've got them set up properly. I'm a sole trader working from home, and I have multiple, rotated, offline backups. Even if ransomware sat hiding on my system for weeks, I'd still have most of my data at the point when it revealed itself. Best case, I'd lose nothing. Absolute worst case, I'd lose 30 days – and they'd have to have worked very hard to keep hidden from me in that time. I have a spideysense for unusual behaviours or slight, unexpected hesitations on my machines when there should be none, and I go delving to find out what's happening. But I guess that's an advantage of having a small set-up and an enquiring mind.

In the market for a second-hand phone? Check it's still supported by the vendor – almost a third sold are not

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: I like how...

Yeah, but, I'll never be at much risk by not updating it... although I'd love it if they could update the predictive text to actually make sense of apostrophes.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: This is why budget/mid range phones are normally better

I can't argue. I agree with you. I even upvoted you. But I somehow find your impromptu specificity slightly unnerving.

Hubert Cumberdale

I like how...

...my Nokia 105 doesn't really have software to speak of. The buttons are beginning to wear off a bit now, though.

Elite name on Brit scene sponsors retro video games preservation project at the Centre for Computing History

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Tribbles/Trubbles

Reminds me of the Best. Cross-over. Ever. Also contains an awesome reference to the crapness of the Klingons in the original ST.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Screenshot

I remember being very impressed as a kid when I found out that the real secret to smooth animation on the BBC Micro/Master was colour-palette cycling. It's a neat trick that makes the best use of a very limited system. I'm guessing Elite had a number of tricks like that up its sleeve. It was also absolute genius how they used a pseudo-random number generator to create all the star systems at run time, meaning they could get round the problem of the (then) vast storage space that would otherwise have been needed.

But ah, I can still remember the smell of the box that glorious 5¼" floppy came in.

Someone made an AI that predicted gender from email addresses, usernames. It went about as well as expected

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: What about dogs?

Is Spotify actually run by a dog? That would explain why I keep getting canine-themed recommendations (Hounds of Love, Dogs of War, Black-eyed Dog, Do the Dog, Hound Dog, Puppy Love, Skinny Puppy, Snoop Dogg, WOLFgang Amadeus Mozart... I could go on...).

Hubert Cumberdale

What about dogs?

On the Internet, it still seems that nobody knows you're a dog.

Google allowed to remember search results to news articles it was asked to forget. Good

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Confused

Would you really call 2.75% "a decent following"? Yes, it's not invisible, but it's very much a minor player. Though I'm sad to see DDG, my search engine of choice, down at a measly 0.49%. The figures for the UK seem a little stronger for both, I'll admit.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Sad and bad and mad

And indeed achieves a sentence.

Gone in 15 minutes: Qualcomm claims new chargers will fill your smartmobe in a flash

Hubert Cumberdale

Apple is reportedly considering plans to sell a new 20W fast charger separately.

Now there's a surprise. I wonder how much it will cost.

USA seeks Moon and Mars nuke power plant designs ready to fly in 2027

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Coudn't they have specified...

I was imagining living quarters pressurised to ~1 atmosphere. If the working pressure were closer to that inside an aeroplane cabin, then I'd say it would be worth designing a pressurised kettle. However, I think if you were attempting to make tea in the ~3 × 10−15 atm of the moon's surface, you'd have bigger problems than getting a decent cuppa.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Beltway Blues

I tried to rectify an AC girl once – she told me not to try it again.

Hubert Cumberdale

Coudn't they have specified...

...a proper voltage, like 230V? The US's piddling voltage is one reason it's so hard to get a decent cup of tea there – their mains circuits don't really have enough oomph to power a good kettle.

Hubert Cumberdale

RTFA...

"solar power won’t be enormously useful or reliable in the South Pole location planned for US Moon bases"

Microsoft wants to show enterprises that Edge means business, rather than the thing you use to download Chrome

Hubert Cumberdale

Don't forget God Mode

I find it quite useful.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: I maybe stuck in my ways but...

I cringe at every little thing that MS does to try to be down with the kids while ending up sounding at best like an uncool dad and at worst like a creepy uncle. Not sure what I mean? Just Bing it.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: New Edge = Chrome with Office 365 login

I vote for KeePassXC, but I guess it's not very businessy.

Raytheon techie who took home radar secrets gets 18 months in the clink in surprise time fraud probe twist

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Maybe

Pretty easy call, I'd say. I'd have anything important backed up off site and anything dodgy only in one place. As an aside, it's much easier to find a sledgehammer than a military radar...

Hubert Cumberdale

And there's me thinking...

...that Massachusetts were things you might find in your hanky.

Hubert Cumberdale

Did he not

already know how to securely wipe things from his computer(s)? I would've thought that was part of his training. (Also, could he not just figure out something like "cp /dev/null /dev/hda" after booting from a live CD? A bit obvious to anyone who looks at the disk afterwards, perhaps, but it would've been a start. He can't've been a bright spark.)

What evil lurks within the data centre, and why is it DDoS-ing the ever-loving pants off us?

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: TomTom Updates

I continue to be surprised at the relatively low market share of Firefox – it's not perfect, but I much prefer it to Chrome (not least because of the spyware aspects you mention). But yes, I still have to keep Chrome around for those dumbass sites that don't work in FF.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: TomTom Updates

Ah, the days when things were written specifically for IE. I remember having to manually tinker with pages to get them to work properly in it. Isn't it great now that every browser behaves in exactly the same way and conforms exactly to the same standards. Isn't it? Okay, well, maybe we're not quite there yet. But it's getting better.

Russia tested satellite-to-satellite shooter, say UK and USA

Hubert Cumberdale
Mushroom

What are they building up there?

That's no moon...

Shocked I am. Shocked to find that underground bank-card-trading forums are full of liars, cheats, small-time grifters

Hubert Cumberdale

And there's another

hoodie hacker. Like the one from Tuesday. But this one has three screens and a laptop. I have that. But no hoodie. So I guess I must be one of the good guys.

Networking boffins detect wide abuse of IPv4 addresses bought on secondary market

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: I thought we were trying...

I thought you were joking at first, but now I see that it actually is. Looking at the larger version, it's more clearly female. But the code on the screen looks a bit 'shopped. Or maybe that's just the JPEG compression artefacts.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: I thought we were trying...

Oh look, here's another one.

Hubert Cumberdale

I thought we were trying...

...to move away from the "hacker in a hoodie" stock photos. Well, I guess at least the one you used for the front page hook is of apparently indeterminate gender, cos, y'know, equality and stuff.

You've had your pandemic holiday, now Microsoft really is going to kill off TLS 1.0, 1.1

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Skype

Also, could they make it actually deliver messages to me, please? It's been decidedly flaky for some time. A couple of days ago, someone sent me a message at 0830, and when I actually spoke to them in person at 1700, it still hadn't appeared. It only arrived after I did a hard log out–log in (but by then its delivery was of course pointless). This has been happening a lot lately, and it's driving me nuts.

Mainframe madness as the snowflakes take control – and the on-duty operator hasn't a clue how to stop the blizzard

Hubert Cumberdale

Reminds me of the day,

one April 1st in the mid-90s, when a wandering sheep mysteriously appeared on the desktop of every machine on my school network as part of the login script. It's amazing how easy it was to mock up a convincing Novell login screen in Visual Basic in those days. One could (hypothetically, of course) set it running on a machine known to be frequented by admins, and it would feign a BSOD and force a (normal) reboot once it had harvested the credentials. It was a simpler time.

Google gives Gmail's collab chops a good buffing to make it the 'home for work' while we're working from home

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Meanwhile . . .

Do you mean the confirmation-of-delivery kind of return receipt, or the confirmation-of-reading type? I've never felt the need for the former, as I'll get a standard bounce if something fails, and I find the latter kinda creepy. If I want to open an email and then pretend I haven't read it yet, then that's my prerogative. That's why I like the fact that Tutanota blocks all hotlinked images in emails by default. No hidden pixels for me, thanks.

Hubert Cumberdale

Ah, Google+: bandwagon, missed. Anyway, I've moved on to Tutanota now. Functionality and features are a little lacking, to be honest, and the client is buggy, but it's getting better. Still happier with it than I was with GMail, though. And of course, privacy blah blah.

Twitter says hack of key staff led to celebrity, politician, biz account hijack mega-spree

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Twitter hack

I can't believe you came out of hiding after best part of a year – having posted only two things in the last nearly four years – just to post that. I guess maybe you're usually AC. Also, you weren't the first. Just that someone else got cold feet and deleted it. But maybe that was you too. In summary: what?

Microsoft Visual Studio gets .NET Core debugging – on WSL2

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: I can hear it...

Looks like I scared them away. Result. I also have a rock that keeps tigers away.

Hubert Cumberdale

I can hear it...

...the stampede of people coming to this comments section to rant about the evils .NET and Micro$oft and "why would anybody want to ... something something ..." and "abomination ... something something ... " and excessively sized binary dependencies and how serious developers roll their own bits to form artisanal hexadecimals. Well, shall we assume we've done all that?

The reluctant log trawler: The buck stops with the back-end

Hubert Cumberdale
Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Bodging someone else's cock-up

It's their cock-up, your arse.

Microsoft to pull support for PHP: Version 8? Exterminate, more like...

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Why would anyone care?

TBH, even if I were running a web server on Windows for some practical reason or other, I'd probably still have it in a Linux VM.

.NET Core: Still a Microsoft platform thing despite more than five years open source

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: What's up with non-.NET developers thinking?

+10²³. Favourite comment of the month.

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