* Posts by Hubert Cumberdale

159 posts • joined 4 Sep 2019

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Microsoft Visual Studio gets .NET Core debugging – on WSL2

Hubert Cumberdale

I can hear it...

...the stampede of people coming to this comments section to rant about the evils .NET and Micro$oft and "why would anybody want to ... something something ..." and "abomination ... something something ... " and excessively sized binary dependencies and how serious developers roll their own bits to form artisanal hexadecimals. Well, shall we assume we've done all that?

The reluctant log trawler: The buck stops with the back-end

Hubert Cumberdale
Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Bodging someone else's cock-up

It's their cock-up, your arse.

Microsoft to pull support for PHP: Version 8? Exterminate, more like...

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Why would anyone care?

TBH, even if I were running a web server on Windows for some practical reason or other, I'd probably still have it in a Linux VM.

.NET Core: Still a Microsoft platform thing despite more than five years open source

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: What's up with non-.NET developers thinking?

+10²³. Favourite comment of the month.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: What's up with non-.NET developers thinking?

As I've noted before, the "C-pound" snark doesn't really work in the UK ("C£"?).

CEO of motherboard maker MSI dies after plunging from headquarters' seventh-floor

Hubert Cumberdale

Sad.

If he could've talked to someone, he might have realised there were other ways out.

As an aside, I quite like MSI's motherboard offerings, but I'm coming to strongly dislike their "Dragon" software. It seems massively bloated for what it does, and I see bits of it high up my list of active processes far too often for my liking.

Shopped recently in a small online store? Check this list to see if it was one of 570 websites infected with card-skimming Magecart

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: I won't shop at a small site

I had to look at the html to see exactly what you did there. Good show. Scary stuff.

Linux kernel coders propose inclusive terminology coding guidelines, note: 'Arguments about why people should not be offended do not scale'

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: I am obviously a horrible person and possibly racist...

Wish I could upvote you more. I'm afraid you and I are on the losing side of this war, though. Just compare the waveforms of any of the early CDs to those of any recorded from about 2005... the former is often an interesting landscape, the latter is usually a solid rectangle.

Euro police forces infiltrated encrypted phone biz – and now 'criminal' EncroChat users are being rounded up

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Matters arising

Is criminal mastermind oxymoronic like military intelligence?

Or like Microsoft Works?

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: re: Except the rubbery ones.

I went to a Chinese restaurant the other day, and I says to the waiter, I says, "this chicken is rubbery". And I got cancelled for attempting to extract humour from outdated stereotypes based on exaggerated accents.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Matters arising

Agreed. As a criminal*, I would be highly suspicious of any such system. And paying four figures for a special phone? Have none of them heard of Signal et al.? Even WhatsApp is end-to-end encrypted these days. I don't geddit.

(*that is to say, if I were a criminal...)

Analogue radio given 10-year stay of execution as the UK U-turns on DAB digital future

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Thank fuck for that

Ah, but you should hear my Hi-Fi. It has a built-in system for polishing each electron individually so the sound is scientifically clean, and these are then lovingly transported along solid platinum speaker cables that have no curves with a radius greater than 3km to speakers that require no coils because their cones resonate naturally from a sense of pure joy at the quality of the signal they're receiving. If you listen carefully, you can hear the conductor's asthma.

Hubert Cumberdale

True in many cases, but a bit sweeping...

...if you compare a broadcast of BBC1 HD to its analogue predecessor, I think you'll find the former is somewhat higher quality. Now, other "cheap" channels, on the other hand, can look fine until anything actually moves, when they turn into a blocky mess.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Radio 4 LW?

Not to mention what would become of the radio teleswitch services.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Thank fuck for that

This! Compare Radio 3 with decent headphones on FM and DAB – even with a hiss and a crackle, the absolute breadth of the sound on FM is astonishing compared to the flat, two-dimensional sound of DAB, even at 192kbit/s. I really want it to be better, I do, but it simply isn't. It's not just the dynamic range – whatever psychoacoustic model is used for DAB compression, I suspect nobody was thinking about classical music when it was devised. How does MP3 at 192kbit/s sound so much better? Surely that's an older spec?

Brit MPs vote down bid to delay IR35 reforms, press ahead with new tax rules for private-sector contractors

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: And...

Yes, yes, very amusing, very clever, etc., but I was quite clear that I was talking about avoidance, and I am quite clear about the difference. However, HMRC decided retrospectively that something was evasion when they had previously categorised it as avoidance, which is a case of going back in time and moving the goalposts. Which I consider to be just plain rude. And quite against the inter-temporally agreed laws of time travel.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: And...

I wasn't expressing an opinion either way... just noting that whenever IR35 is mentioned, people seem to fall into one of two (apparently rather angry and/or resentful) camps. As a self-employed sole trader (not directly in IT, I might add) I have no skin in the game, so I don't feel it's my place to comment.

However, on a slight tangent, I will say that whatever the morality of tax avoidance schemes (and I'm not implying that people are working as contractors to avoid tax – that's a minefield that could cause an argument in itself (and probably will)), it seems a little harsh to back-date things quite so much as HMRC seem to be inclined (although not with IR35, apparently). If something was technically legal at the time (and especially if people were pushed onto tax avoidance schemes without really understanding them or having any real choice about it), then I don't see how they can go back 20 years to claw back vast sums of money that have probably already been spent, bankrupting people in the process. Perhaps they should have closed the loophole sooner if it was upsetting them that much.

Hubert Cumberdale

And...

...cue the usual polarised stream of comments from those who feel aggrieved at how it will affect them and those who think contractors have it too easy and they had it coming...

Barclays Bank appeared to be using the Wayback Machine as a 'CDN' for some Javascript

Hubert Cumberdale
Terminator

Re: Data not at risk?

I need your clothes, boots, and motorcycle.

It's not a Windows 10 release without something breaking so here's a troubleshooter for your OneDrive woes

Hubert Cumberdale

I haven't even got 2004 yet...

...but I still had to spend several hours sorting out my OneDrive yesterday. Is it possible that the borkage is more general, or was it just a coincidence?

Microsoft sees the world has moved on, cranks OneDrive file size upload limit from 15GB to more useful 100GB

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: We offer you more space...

I actually pay for it. For some reason.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: But have they upped the file count limit...

Well, MS explicitly say that I "remain the owner of the data", for all that's worth. But in any case, unlike some people, the cloud is only one of several places I keep my stuff... even if they prod/sell/eat my files, at least I have other backups (including off-site copies that are regularly rotated).

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: We offer you more space...

Hmm... a valid point, but if you RTFA, you'll see they're not actually offering more space, just the ability to store bigger files.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: But have they upped the file count limit...

I have hundreds of thousands of files on OneDrive, filling over 800GB, so I guess yes. However, by coincidence*, I've spent a number of hours today trying to stop the bastard doing the "constant syncing but not actually doing anything" thing. This seems to happen arbitrarily once every few months, and I think I've sorted it this time, but it did involve several reboots to safe mode and lots of swearing. This is the one thing that I get really pissed off about with OneDrive. The rest of the time it seems to be at lest moderately stable.

(*or perhaps not, considering they just messed with it)

MIT apologizes, permanently pulls offline huge dataset that taught AI systems to use racist, misogynistic slurs

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Almost

If y'all gonna use fancy-pants words, at least be spellin'em rightw'ds so's we can look 'em up easy in that thaar wordybook.

Macs, iPhones, iPads to get encrypted DNS – how'd you like them Apples?

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Idiot-tax ...

And yet, you're still here.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Bias

That sort of silliness is a fundamental part of the reporting style here; there are other tech news websites you could frequent if you don't like it, but looking through your past comments, it seems this is an axe you grind here quite often. Your life might be more relaxing if you could let it go.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Idiot-tax ...

I'm not an AC, but I still think people who take offence at such monikers (for which this site is well known) should get a thicker skin. If you look closely, you'll see they tend to aim sarcastic negs in all directions (although admittedly they do seem to send rather a lot of them in Apple's direction).

It's National Cream Tea Day and this time we end the age-old debate once and for all: How do you eat yours?

Hubert Cumberdale

To be fair, it's quite possible to like the taste of meat and simultaneously dislike the fact you have to kill animals to get it.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: There is a third option:

No, it's definitely cream first, then sausage.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: There is a third option:

Well, I didn't really expect people to agree. Still stand by it, though. Sometimes it's fun to get 100% downvotes...

Hubert Cumberdale

Vegan black pudding makes no sense... like vegan haggis (which I have tried, alongside real haggis... it wasn't bad, it just wasn't good either) – you're better off just eating something else.

Hubert Cumberdale

There is a third option:

Leave the jam out of it. Personally, I consider jam to be a savoury thing that has no place in anything remotely cake-like.*

No, wait – hear me out. Think about it – jam goes in sandwiches, which aren't generally considered a dessert. I like to have apricot jam with bacon and/or sausages. The Americans (bless them) seem to like it with peanut butter. Just because it has sugar in it, that doesn't mean it can be used in a dessert-like context. I believe the acidity of it spoils the taste of a perfectly good sponge cake, messes with the sensations derived from cream (in whatever order), and generally just gets in the way of whatever sweet thing it is that I really want to eat.

In summary: scone first, then cream, then other half of scone.

*Including doughnuts. I'm not with Bob Marley on this one.

An unfortunate bit of product placement for Microsoft as Liverpool celebrates winning some silverware

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Clarification

Yes, "they" indeed, but certainly not "we": I find it weird when when people that watch the kicking-ball thing and happen to like a particular group of ball kickers say "we won". Makes me think of when a toddler "helps" in the kitchen – probably enjoying themselves and having a fun time with the person doing the actual work, who in turn may enjoy the presence of said toddler – and then says triumphantly, "we made a cake". I guess it's cute, in a way.

Talk about the fox guarding the hen house. Comcast to handle DNS-over-HTTPS for Firefox-using subscribers

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Naive or Complicit?

I cheerfully send all my DoH DNS queries to Cloudflare. At least they're so big that hopefully my data will get list in a big pond... I hope...

CompSci student bitten by fox after feeding it McNuggets

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Once caught

It's fine, because contrary to popular belief, sheep ≠ clouds. Anyway, never mind his degree in meteorology, Tomasz Schafernaker must have a master's degree in seamlessly covering up after a rude gesture. But it seems to be from the University of Wrexham.

Windows fails to reach the Finnish line as Helsinki signage pleads for help

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Let's cross this one off the list?

It can be done – I've done it – but it seriously should not be this hard.

Belief in 5G conspiracy theories goes hand-in-hand with small explosions of rage, paranoia and violence, researchers claim

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: I'm prone to all of those things and yet I don't believe in the 5G conspiracy.

Bluetooth causes me rage simply because it can be so flaky.

What's the Arm? First Apple laptop to ditch Intel will be 13.3" MacBook Pro, proclaims reliable soothsayer

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Shades of Yahoo!

I really dislike the nounification of "creative".

C is for 'Careful now', D is for 'Download surprise': Microsoft to resurrect optional Windows 10 updates as 'Previews'

Hubert Cumberdale

Never mind Edge's memory use...

...will they ever fix that thing whereby periodically my machine gradually and inexplicably has its committed memory creep up to the point where things start suddenly disappearing. I have no pagefile, and turning it on may well stop things going pop. But go on, fight me about why I should have any of my memory contents written to disk when I've got 24GB on a standard workstation that day to day is used for little more than surfing and document editing. The only way I can fix this is by rebooting – not even closing all applications and manually killing background tasks will make any difference. I have literally no idea what is eating the commit, and believe me I've tried Process Explorer et al. to try and get to the bottom of it, but to no avail. Suggestions welcome (other than to turn on my pagefile).

With intelligent life in scant supply on Earth, boffins search for technosignatures of civilizations in the galaxy

Hubert Cumberdale

And there's me thinking...

..that the technosignature is usually 4/4 at around 140 bpm.

By emptying offices, coronavirus has hastened the paperless office

Hubert Cumberdale

I used to do the print/sign/scan thing...

...then I realised I could just scan my signature (or a few slightly different versions thereof, just for authenticity across several documents with the same client) and stamp it onto the PDF. When you think about it, it's not really any less secure (anyone could scan your signature from somewhere and do the same), and the result is of much higher quality. I guess if you wanted people to think you'd physically signed it, you could find some way of reducing the resolution and adding speckles, making it slightly skewiff, etc. I expect there will be people out there that insist that it just has to be signed physically because them's the rules or something. But they're just silly.

Also, still not convinced DocuSign is any more secure... people will see the little stamp thingy and just do some equivalent of this.

Ex-director cops community service after 5,000-file deletion spree on company Dropbox

Hubert Cumberdale

So... the headline should be

"Company learns hard lesson about eggs and baskets, woman slapped on wrist for exploiting their stupidity"

Whose side you on, Nominet? Registry floods .co.uk owners with begging emails to renew unwanted .uk domains

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Nominet is a member-led organisation, working to improve...

Personally speaking, being "member led" has got me into some trouble in the past.

It looks like you want to browse the internet with Chrome. Would you like help? Maybe try Edge? Please?

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Microsoft seriously pushing Edge

Indeed. It's the late 90s all over again. C*nts.

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Ah, that explains why...

I'm actually surprised that Firefox (or other forks/semi-parallel lines) has such a low market share these days. I'm rather fond of it. It's certainly not perfect, but I find it the least-worst option in terms of balancing security/usability/non-Googliness/non-tracking etc.

Hubert Cumberdale

Ah, that explains why...

...my mum was asking me what this "Edge" thing was and whether she needed to do anything about it. Bastards. Starting to be desperate bastards, too, perhaps understandably.

Splunk to junk masters and slaves once a committee figures out replacements

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Male and female connectors..

My detector is malfunctioning... can't tell if pot stirrer, joker, or other... not sure which vote button to use... aborting voting process...

Hubert Cumberdale

Re: Ok....but whitespace?

As a Jaffa, I find your post conflating impotence and azoospermia highly offensive. I'm perfectly capable of making some very loud bangs, it's just that I can't successfully STONITH.

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