* Posts by chrisw67

17 posts • joined 28 Sep 2017

Heir-to-Concorde demo model to debut in October

chrisw67

Re: Not far enough

That's quite a range increase: the north Atlantic is a puddle. LHR-JFK 2999 nautical miles, LAX-SYD 6507, LAX-Shanghai 5635, LAX-Seoul 5209. Even running LAX-HNL-SYD gives a 2220-4400 mile split.

Concorde's range was 3900 nautical miles for comparison. In its promotional runs to Sydney (eastwards) it needed two fuel stops and was speed limited over most land masses.

NASA trusted 'traditional' Boeing to program its Starliner without close supervision... It failed to dock due to bugs

chrisw67

Re: So what happened?

They should be able to manage two out of three golden parachutes.

EU aviation wonks give all-electric training aeroplane the green light – but noob pilots only have 50 mins before they have to land it

chrisw67

Re: Reserve power?

None that I am aware of... but then they have not had to design the airframe that way. A Boeing 737-800 is approx MTOW 79000 kg and MLW 63500 kg. Retrofitting electric engines in an airframe like this, if at all possible, would have to stay below the MLW at takeoff.

ALGOL 60 at 60: The greatest computer language you've never used and grandaddy of the programming family tree

chrisw67

Re: No love for CORAL 66?

Late 1980s, GEC 4000 machines with OS4000 and CORAL-66 cross-compiling for an airborne real-time acoustic processor (AQS-901 a version of the Marconi-Elliott 920 ATC). The good ol' days indeed.

Academics: We hate to ask, but could governments kindly refrain from building giant data-slurping, contact-tracing coronavirus monsters?

chrisw67

Re: Finally?

I had to laugh at the irony in, one the one hand, assuring us the data would be secure and not used for other purposes, and on the other, passing the application through the Australian Signals Directorate (think GCHQ or NSA data-slurp central) for their imprimatur. Might be completely innocent use of their IT security expertise, but it is nonetheless a great way to feed the conspiracy theories.

'That's here. That's home. That's us': It's 30 years since Voyager 1 looked back and squinted at a 'Pale Blue Dot'

chrisw67

Re: Finally?

They like a bit of selfie action too!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJCedFwrVqk

Microsoft: Reckon our code is crap? Prove it and $30k could be yours

chrisw67

A blessing and a curse

If I was paid by the bug found in some of the software I am blessed with supporting I could retire real soon. On the other hand, if I was not paid until the bugs were _fixed_ the soup kitchen would beckon.

Clip, clip, hooray: NASA says it will send Clipper probe to Europa, will attempt no landing there

chrisw67
Thumb Up

Re: "Fall Creators Update"

Well played, Sir.

Incoming! Microsoft unleashes more fixes for Windows 10 October 2018 Update

chrisw67

Drive mapping issue?

Win 10 arbitrarily deciding that it could not connect to drives you used just minutes ago, while still connecting to others on the same server, predates the October update. Happened to my Win 10 1803 build in the last few days... unless, of course, it is a new and exciting issue they added to the October debacle and subsequently fixed.

Strewth! Aussie ISP gets eye-watering IPv4 bill, shifts to IPv6 addresses

chrisw67

Re: Finally?

I guess I should not be surprised. I just got IPv6 juices flowing at home and I am shortly (yeah right!) blessed with HFC NBN.

Is this a technical limitation of the HFC infrastructure entry/exit points, or just penny pinching TPG style?

Oz digital health agency tightens medical record access as watchdog warns of crim honeypot

chrisw67

Not just law enforcement

'Section 70 of the Act gives the ADHA discretion to release information without a warrant, if it “reasonably believes that the use or disclosure is reasonably necessary” for law enforcement purposes.'

If I was feeling generous I might assume that any law enforcement purpose could already be covered by a court-issued warrant. However, the Act does not require a warrant for law enforcement purposes just a "reasoanble belief" on the part of the system operator. This was deliberate wording, not an accident.

More concerning for me is that only "reasoanble belief" is required to release information to "protect the public revenue" (70(1)(c)). So, when a government is looking to save a few bucks on Medicare it can trawl this information, in aggregate, for the areas it could cut with least public backlash. Or, in or targeted fashion, evaluate "suspect" citizens or groups with a view to reducing their personal Medicare or private health rebates. Even worse, "protecting the public revenue" could mean increasing the public revenue by on-selling the data to anybody with the cash. All good as long as someone at a system operator being paid by the government arrives at "reasoanble belief" when requested by the government.

nbn™ CEO didn't mean to offend gamers, just brand them unwelcome bandwidth-hogs

chrisw67

"...some “super users” on its fixed wireless services are downloading “terabytes” per month. The company is considering fair-use clause in contracts (as apply to its SkyMuster satellite services) or even traffic shaping to cope."

Two thoughts:

Imposing conditions on users of a satellite service is going to help users of the congested fixed-wireless segments exactly how?

Up until now, NBN would skate away from issues by insisting that end users were not its customers and directing the problem to RSPs. NBN is now acknowledging that it has end-user customers that it can impose conditions on. I don't know if this is deliberate muddying-of-the-waters for convenience or if this guy is unaware of how consumer-hostile the organisation has been to date.

NAB mainframe turns its TOESUP* after power outage, offline 7 hours

chrisw67

Compensate their customers.... and who else?

I do not bank with NAB but two of three transactions I attempted on Saturday were nonetheless forced to cash-only because the merchant was with NAB. I went to an ATM and withdrew cash. Not a big deal for me but I imagine a lot of people did this generating an abnormal run on ATMs. Restocking cash in unusually depleted ATMs will cost the ATM operators (other banks and private enterprises) something that they will not get back from NAB.

NAB best not charge businesses for depositing the cash they took on Saturday.

Twitter: Why we silenced Rose McGowan after she slammed alleged sex pest Harvey Weinstein

chrisw67

Phone Number Violation?

Surely if the Twits have an algorithm to identify a private phone number in a post then surely they can code a mechanism to either suppress the post or blot out the number before publishing it. Even if the phone number is identified by a human complaint they could simply remove the post or number.

The cynical me thinks that Twitter have either received a legal threat, or decided that this was a way to get themselves in the news again.

Joint Committee on the NBN splits, as National Party member sides with opposition

chrisw67

That 160 Gbps is per-dish and the fully developed SKA will many hundreds of dishes in a tiered arrangement. Some of the larger links in the system are being scoped around 80Tbps.

chrisw67

While we are on a spelling rant... The quoted recommendation, “clear information about the maximum attainable layer 2 speed of their NBN infrastructure/service on a per premise basis,” perpetuates the stupidity that "premise" is a single premises and not, as any dictionary shows, a statement or proposition as a basis for a work or theory. This particular faux pas is repeated a number of times in the recommendations and elsewhere in gems like "fibre-to-the-premise technology", "cost-per-premise," or "premise-by-premise basis."

Scared of that new-fangled 'cloud'? Office 2019 to the rescue!

chrisw67

Re: Small-minded men

If you run Windows 10, which will be a pre-requisite for this software, then you are already storing everything on someone else's computer... at least that is how Microsoft see it.

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