* Posts by sbt

643 posts • joined 9 Aug 2017

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Internet jerk with million-plus fans starts 14-year stretch for bizarre dot-com armed robbery

sbt Silver badge

The only time all jurors have to agree is a murder case

Whether majority verdicts are acceptable differs between jurisdictions, in terms of the charges to which a majority verdict could apply (e.g. not for capital crimes) or the composition of the majority (e.g. 11:1, 10:2, etc.).

It's easy to forget that trial-by-jury is not even the norm in global terms.

sbt Silver badge
Devil

Second of his name.

His father might be wishing he is dead, if only to be spared the ignominy of sharing his name with this f*cknuckle.

Shame the defence gets to waste everyone's time and money with the appeal. The juror strike grounds seem pretty thin; I can't see a juror of any ethnicity giving this PoS a walk.

FTC kicks feet through ash pile that once was Cambridge Analytica with belated verdict

sbt Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Yet another demonstration of feeble corporate regulation

Not your downthumb, but there's a distinction between insurance beneficiaries here; It's true I can't get PI coverage for my clients for my own illegality, but I can easily protect myself against criminal acts by others (e.g. theft/arson for property). So it would be the case that the legal setup required would be atypical viz. policyholders, actors and covered entities. If governments were the beneficiaries (e.g. on behalf of citizens/tax collectors), then they could be policy holders and fund via self-insurance or levies, etc).

As long as the beneficiaries are not the policy holder, then I think it's possible to get coverage for illegality. It's how our compulsory personal injury coverage for driving works here; victims (other drivers/pedestrians) are still covered, even if the driver (and policy holder) breaks the law.

sbt Silver badge
Go

Bad managers ... generally get a new job running a new company

Well this is the precisely the outcome I'm suggesting there can be a financial incentive created to avoid. If regulators aren't willing to force the professionalisation of management with proper qualifications* and peer scrutiny (like there are for medicos, lawyers or engineers) or disqualify more than the most egregious f*ck-ups, then a direct relationship can be established by forcing businesses to find underwriters willing to take a risk on the people involved. It would place more emphasis in skills in long-term business sustainability, not merely the ability to come in, pump profits by stripping costs and then jumping off to the next business with the golden parachute.

So there's the risk of the closed-shop and other perverse outcomes from peer-managed professional access controls (most likely at the expense of broader representation of minorities in management); markets for risk can also be heavily biased by stereotyping and group-think, but it's better than nothing given there's so little trust in government regulation these days. Can't think why.

* I don't mean BS quals like MBAs, naturally.

sbt Silver badge
Flame

Yet another demonstration of feeble corporate regulation

In my field, my clients expect me to have generous professional and public indemnity insurance. Maybe one way to clean up this mess of bad corporate actors rushing for the lifeboats unharmed while the creditors or victims such as the clients, employees or suppliers go down with ship would be to make some form of insolvency and/or misconduct insurance mandatory; that way at least someone (i.e. the underwriters) with a vested financial interest would be looking into the conduct of the business's operators and pricing their premiums accordingly. The risks of large fines for GDPR non-compliance and the premiums to cover them might also make organisations think more clearly about whether they need all this data on their customers at all. Good corporate government and risk management should reduce premiums.

Bad managers with a history of failed companies would get swept out as too expensive to partner with or employ. And there'd be a means to recoup missing tax, pensions, etc. in the case of insolvency. It's too easy to start and too easy to fail limited companies, without personal consequences.

I'm sure adding yet more insurance has its downsides and the customers will pay in the end, but it's just a thought.

Things Microsoft will be glad to never see again: Windows 10 1809 and Windows Phone Office

sbt Silver badge
Devil

"... spew out ... like a candy-filled toddler on a waltzer"

Simile of the week, and it's only Monday.

I've always thought of the combination of fairground rides and fairground concessions as an opportunity to recycle sugar into geometry, such as arcs, epicycloids, trochoids, etc. Much like those bags of sand on pendulums.

Forget sharks with lasers, NASA kits out an elephant seal with a sensor-studded skullcap

sbt Silver badge
Devil

Caption seems inaccurate, based on the expression

Looks more like: What the f*ck is this thing on my head?! Get it off!

Reasons to be fearful 2020: Smishing, public Wi-Fi, deepfakes... and all the usual suspects

sbt Silver badge
Meh

Public Wi-fi factor must be in decline, surely

Now that 4G and later data plans are available at reasonable cost, there is increasingly less need to use public Wi-fi services for anything remotely private or confidential, I'd have thought. Not a big user of mobile data so far, but a decent allowance for minimal spend should be in reach for most folks in markets where public Wi-fi is also available.

Listen up you bunch of bankers. Here are some pointers for less crap IT

sbt Silver badge
Boffin

companies and FMIs would be expected to ... <plan for business continuity>

It'll be interesting to see how much the cost of banking will increase when all the tellers are sackedredeployed, the ATMs removed and cash is no longer an option to fall back on.

Doogee Wowser: The S40's a terrible smartphone, but a passable projectile

sbt Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: There was a time....

I found they missed with the wooden handled ones, but not with the ones entirely constructed of felt.

It's amazing I remember anything from that time.

Uncle Sam challenged in court for slurping social media info on 'millions' of visa applicants

sbt Silver badge
Devil

Two steps forward, one step back

Hope the State Department loses. I can see them saying, "but, at least we're not asking for the credentials anymore!".

Scammy and spammy harassers are chasing veteran pros off crypto-collab platform Keybase

sbt Silver badge
Unhappy

... the ability to block and report users directly to an administrator with two clicks.

That's still one click too many.

Block, filter and abuse reporting is part of your minimum viable product, even if you've opt-in only, address book controlled or private messaging functions.

Icahn and I will force a Xerox and HP wedding: Corporate raider urges HP shareholders to tell board to act 'NOW'

sbt Silver badge
Facepalm

Icahn asks: What is the downside?

Well, for a start there's the waste of time for HP's board when they could be actually focused on fixing the business rather than selling it. And then there's the disclosure of HP's sensitive information to a competitor in the diligence process that Xerox gets to keep even if the acquisition doesn't go ahead.

And that's not even considering the effects on the employees and customers.

Asteroid Bennu is flinging particles of dust and rock from its surface – and scientists can't work out why

sbt Silver badge
Devil

... in the late afternoon

When your day is only 4 hours long, the ejections will be over pretty quickly.

123-Reg is at it again: Registrar charges chap for domains he didn’t order – and didn't want

sbt Silver badge
Facepalm

a complete dog's breakfast

This shower of clowns make a dog's breakfast look like a 10-course silver-service degustation.

Very suspicious that the "innocent" mistakes always seem to end-up to the benefit of the mistaken.

We know this sounds weird but in future we could ask fiber optic cables: Did the earth move for you... literally?

sbt Silver badge
Trollface

Fiber optic cables are fed into boreholes

Now, that's not a very nice way to describe your media organisations!

Just in case you were expecting 10Gbps, Wi-Fi 6 hits 700Mbps in real-world download tests

sbt Silver badge
Coat

So for 3D on my 4K, it's not 5G, but Wi-Fi 6 I need? Sounds like Seven

It's getting a bit arbritary here with these codes (although less confusing than the 802.11 series, I grant you).

Now that MS is talking about 10X, will Apple complain that they were there first with OS X, or move on quietly since it's all gone to California from the cats?

Roman numerals in III, II, I...

Mine's the 3XL. -->

Since the FCC won't act, Congress finally moves on robocalls by passing half-decent TRACED Act

sbt Silver badge
Flame

The huge, almost unanimous 417-3 vote

If Pai had any shame, he'd see that vote for the searing indictment of his leadership of the FCC and his total failure to act so far that it is. However, I expect precisely nothing will change while he's in the chair.

Mission Accomplished! seems to be the order of day; declare victory and go home.

In a touching tribute to its $800m-ish antitrust fine, Qualcomm tears wraps off Snapdragon 865 chip for 5G phones

sbt Silver badge
WTF?

"...a discrete *non-optional* part"

(my emphasis)

Isn't that the kind of play they've just been fined for?

Bandwidth weirdness at TalkTalk has customers fuming at being denied on-demand I'm A Celeb

sbt Silver badge
Meh

"This has now been fully resolved."

Maybe I'm just getting too cynical in my dotage, but when they wheel this line out, I have trouble believing even the most capable and reliable of service providers. TalkTalk? No chance.

Pablo Escobar's brother is Medellín in the foldable phone biz, sniffing out new markets

sbt Silver badge
FAIL

... this firm actually appears on Companies House’ records

Doesn't mean much these days. So did the "makers" of the ZX Spectrum Vega+, Retro Computers Ltd.

Trump Administration fast-tracks compulsory border facial recognition scans for all US citizens

sbt Silver badge
Mushroom

Pack it up, boys; the terrorists have won.

They've opened the door to vested interests with reactionary totalitarian tendencies to destroy western liberal democracy and the freedom of movement and expression that once went with it.

Is it too late? Only if you take to the ballot-box and force a back-down. HK knows what's up. Do you?

EU wouldn't! Uncle Sam brandishes 'up to 100%' tariffs over France's Digital Services Tax

sbt Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Americans like their cheese like they like their leaders; orange and bland.

I'm just not sure how worried the Roquefort makers should be. How much can they be selling in the land where cheese ships in a can?

I love Paris. -->

Boffins believe it was volcanoes, not just life, that made Earth what it is today – oxygen rich

sbt Silver badge
Boffin

So what happened to the formaldehyde?

Surely it would have been preserved?

Nit: That reaction is super, but normally the numbers in chemical formulae are subscripts.

US Embassy in London files extradition request for ex-Autonomy boss over HPE fraud charges

sbt Silver badge
Coat

Mike's on a European Vacation

Er, it's POKE. C'mon, this is BASIC.

Mine's the one with the National Lampoon DVD in the pocket. -->

Vote rigging, election fixing, ballot stuffing: Just another day in the life of a Register reader

sbt Silver badge
Happy

Well played? Not recently, but I've just given it another spin

Think my fave is Faster Than the Hound.

sbt Silver badge
Coat

... her pic was part of the evidence

Sounds like it would have been more appropriate if the band had been The Horslips.

Mine's the one with the Rollback CD in the pocket. -->

Internet Society CEO: Most people don't care about the .org sell-off – and nothing short of a court order will stop it

sbt Silver badge
Facepalm

I haven't seen an interviewee so clueless and out-of-touch since ...

... well, OK, it was last week on Newsnight.

Christmas in tatters for Nottinghamshire tots after mayor tells them Santa's too busy

sbt Silver badge
Facepalm

Christians are close to atheists...

...rejecting all gods but one; atheists reject all the same ones you do, plus one more.

Not sure why you'd focus on the not-particularly-controversial existence question rather than the significance one, unless you were worried that it's massively more open to doubt. Then again, not sure why you're worried about what atheists doubt at all, given that christians can't even agree amongst themselves on the simplest of doctrinal questions.

Log in your eye, and all that.

sbt Silver badge
Boffin

"Atheism is a religion like not collecting stamps is a hobby" -- Penn Jillette

Gods that don't exist can't have sons. These are questions of history, not faith. There may be evidence for the existence of a man of that name, but frankly a lot of the other details of his origins, life and death are implausible and unlikely.

If there was such a person, I'd say it's more likely he was suffering from a mental illness that made him say and do irrational things, perhaps including willingly martyr himself. Certainly not the last case of seriously deluded egotism or making stuff up. L. Ron Hubbard and Joseph Smith have form, here. Given the long history of human culture, societies and mythology in particular, 99% of which is now no longer taken seriously by anyone, it's more likely that gods are inventions of man, not the other way around.

Uni of London loses attempt to block mobe mast surveyors from Paddington rooftop

sbt Silver badge
Coat

... with respect

Which is a shame; it would have otherwise assisted with placing the furniture appropriately, but 5G frequencies also prevent epoxy adhesives from hardening properly. Co-incidentally, they also interfere with the operation of sildenafil.

sbt Silver badge
Trollface

Nah, it's not brain melting you have to worry about.

Everyone knows that 5G frequencies:

  • Erase the memory of water, interfering with homeopathic remedies;
  • Activate the mercury in vaccines, causing autism;
  • Misalign chakras and interrupt the flow of Qi, so furniture layouts must be shifted by 90° for good Feng Shui;
  • Increase gaming lag and reduce the refractive index of fibre-optic cable, halving bandwidth;
  • Swap the operation of incognito and tracked mode in browsers;
  • Trigger the sending of any draft messages in phones and e-mail systems; and
  • Redact the naughty parts in hentai.

Internet Society's Vint 'father of the 'net' Cerf dodges dot-org sell-off during public Q&A

sbt Silver badge
Alert

At around 1550 local time, Cerf, as meeting chairman, was handed an iPad...

The video link in the article takes you to an empty stage early in the morning session. The outside questions segment starts around 7:49:38.

Spoiler alert: The .org question is not even acknowledged up-front and the presenter who hands off the iPad claims another question about the future of parliaments in Internet regulation is the most popular.

Bad news: 'Unblockable' web trackers emerge. Good news: Firefox with uBlock Origin can stop it. Chrome, not so much

sbt Silver badge
Facepalm

It'd need to be setup that way anyway.

True, I must have been thinking of redirects. I still think certificates would be an issue and given browsers are cracking down on mixed content, so those beacons or scripts would need to be via HTTPS as well.

sbt Silver badge
Boffin

Re: which can unmask CNAME shenanigans

A CNAME record identifies the destination, which an adblocker can either block because it's linked to a different root domain, or if that's too blunt, apply the usual blacklisting to the destination and block the first party sub-domain accordingly.

A records produce an IP, but I assume it's less practical for tracking if the third party server needs to be set up to respond to a bunch of other domains. Probably creates an issue with HTTPS, as well; the third party won't have a legit cert for the sub-domain.

Update Docker: Fun bug involving file paths and shared libraries turns out to be a security hole

sbt Silver badge
Trollface

A Docker by any other name would swear as sweet

They could change the name again. Might slow down the folks looking for something to exploit.

Why can't you be a nice little computer maker and just GET IN THE TRUNK, Xerox tells HP in hostile takeover alert

sbt Silver badge
Coat

Sh*t printer business you got there, it'd be a shame if nothing happened to it!

A crying shame.

Questions hang over Gatwick Airport after low level drone near-miss report

sbt Silver badge
Facepalm

Computer says no

According to the comments guidelines, you need a minimum of 100 accepted comments to add links to your posts.

sbt Silver badge
Facepalm

More theatre at airports than the West End

Seems like this anti-drone technology is worth about as much as the passenger screening processes. Not great, considering the costs.

Mozilla expands bug bounty program and triples payouts for flaw finders for hire

sbt Silver badge
Coat

HMRC will be along shortly with their standard IR35 ruling

Because after all, these organisations also employee people to find bugs?

Mine's the one with the fly swatter in the pocket. -->

Magic Leap's CFO and creative director quit, and it's not a harbinger of doom or anything

sbt Silver badge
Devil

So management have finally cracked the problem...

... of how to be sitting on the VC money when the music stops. It won't be long now.

Intel end-of-lifing BIOS and driver downloads for dusty hardware

sbt Silver badge
Flame

Turns out it was for DR f'ing M

Doesn't affect the service life expectations. Actually, you'd expect cars not driven daily to last longer, and expensive ones to be serviced regularly. In this case though, it seems this was about dongle support, in the form of a proprietary Conditional Access card. The reporting about the CA card actually running the software or being an interface to the car appears to be inaccurate. Which is why they were able to later write software to replace it (if it had been a hardware interface, that wouldn't be true).

There's a hole in my software library from about this time, where I can still run and use pre-2000s software in DOSBox emulation. And I can run later software from the mid 2000s with standard OS support. The gap is from the era of proprietary driver support and weird DRM schemes like bad sectors. This history is getting lost, like 60's TV episodes. Warez crackers are actually doing a public service here in the long run.

sbt Silver badge
Facepalm

Crashing the life-cycle

I took it as a reference to a relevant situation where the need to support old hardware went beyond the normal life-cycle, not that El Reg was attempting to break this news.

I found it interesting anyway. Massively idiotic to tie the fortunes of a car, with expected lifespan measured in decades, to the operation of a single model of IT equipment that may have only been produced over a 6 to 12 month period before being replaced with a newer model. It's bad enough if you limit yourself to one OS, let alone a single bit of kit.

Ex-Capita accountant who claimed £10k bung to leave was blackmail has appeal thrown out

sbt Silver badge
Facepalm

An accountant that doesn't know the difference...

... between receiving and paying is not much of an accountant. Then again, consider their choice of employers...

Email! HUH! Yeah. What is it good for? Absolutely nothing...

sbt Silver badge
Devil

9.212.something

So, an IBM employee, then. Hello.

A bridge over troubled water: Intel teases Ponte Vecchio, the GPU brains in US govt's 1-exaFLOPS Aurora supercomputer

sbt Silver badge
Pint

Getting straight the ponte

Thanks for all the answers here so far; some fascinating insights. Thumbs all around.

It's threads like these that have me questioning the "commentard" label. More like "commentoffins"!

sbt Silver badge
Paris Hilton

We'll burn that bridge when we come to it

Serious question; what's different about Intel's 7nm process that leads to confidence they can deliver it after what happened with the 10nm?

HP to Xerox: Nope, your $33.5bn bid falls short of our valuation

sbt Silver badge
WTF?

Are you thinking of Tim Horton's?

Thanks, but I can't find any references to any M&A transactions between Wendy's and BK.

sbt Silver badge
WTF?

Has this ever ended well?

I keep hearing about these debt-funded buy-outs where the minnow tries to swallow the whale, but I've never heard of it being particularly successful. It just seems like a way to get the financiers' hooks back into legacy businesses that really can't remain profitable and service the debt.

Any examples available where the reverse takeover has been a net win and strengthened the resulting entity?

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