* Posts by slimshady76

121 posts • joined 17 May 2017

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We're all at sea: Navigation Royal Navy style – with plenty of IT but no GPS

slimshady76

Re: Reg units need not apply

Nautical miles are in their natural habitat in er... the navy I guess. The inclusion of yards to measure short distances caught me off guard I must admit, as I regard the UK being leaning more into the Metric system lately. But I guess it also makes sense in the nautical world to keep unit conversion consistency (as stupid as those "one nautical mile equals 3467.2452432 yards" rules of thumb are).

Space tourists splash down in Atlantic Ocean after three days in orbit

slimshady76

Musk said "space is for all of us". Conditions might apply. A bank account sporting over 100 million dollars should be deemed necessary.

slimshady76

Re: Every breath you take...

And sunglasses. I bet he would choose them over the spacesuit's helmet in case of a sudden decompression event.

Dozy ISS cosmonauts woken by smoke alarm on eve of 5-hour spacewalk

slimshady76

Re: OK I'm convinced.

Try to schedule a routine check at your space station module local dealer for your 20+ years old space station and have all the aged components checked/replaced when necessary... It might be possible in 50-100 years, but right now, it just means you will have to accommodate the crew in a smaller segment of your orbital facilities...

slimshady76

Re: "get rid of that"

Nice pictures of folks playing ukulele in zero g with ThinkPads plastered across the background?

This way up: James Webb Space Telescope gets ready for shipment after final tests

slimshady76
Devil

"It's all added to up to a hellishly complicated spacecraft that must unfurl itself in space while controllers monitor things from Earth pray and sacrifice goats."

FTFY.

Icon because that guy on the right knows how to screw things up ---->

Fix five days of server failure with this one weird trick

slimshady76
Pirate

Re: The "inspector"

We used to discharge large capacitors on the rail of my high school's inner balcony, during the recess between classes. Made for a nice soccer style "wave" once you waited long enough to have about 80 other people laying on it to watch the playground below.

Ah, the memories...

Magna Carta mayhem: Protesters lay siege to Edinburgh Castle, citing obscure Latin text that has never applied in Scotland

slimshady76
Coat

Re: Holy Progress

Everyone knows the only proper way to defend a Scottish castle is by employing kamikaze Scotsmen!!

https://youtu.be/Skr6wpsiWI8

Mine is the one with the copy of "How to commit seppuku with a cone of fish and chips" in the left inner pocket.

Russia: Forget about the Nauka incident. Who punched the hole in the Soyuz, hmm?

slimshady76
Alien

Re: Space woodpeckers…

I blame mynocks. You have to keep an eye for them, they like to chew on the cables.

Woman sues McDonald's for $14 after cheeseburger ad did exactly what it's designed to

slimshady76
Coffee/keyboard

Re: The Sin of Gluttony

Slow clap for you Sir! Not so much because of the amazingly nerdy quality of your answer, but because of me having to clean the peanut butter off my mechanical keyboard.

84-year-old fined €250,000 for keeping Nazi war machines – including tank – in basement

slimshady76

Re: Did I miss something?

I had the same confussion when reading that sentence. I take they hooked it to other tanks to take it ouf of his basement without turning it on. They were towing it.

Russia says software malfunction caused Nauka module to unexpectedly fire thrusters, tilt space station

slimshady76
Coat

In space no one can hear you scream...

... hence they weren't able to yell Nauka into obedience, until it capitulated with a final act of incontinence.

Mine is the one with the sign language manual in the inner pocket.

Malware and Trojans, but there's only one horse the boss man wants to hear about

slimshady76
Pint

This installment had strong Denholm vibes!!!

Icon because it's Friday and we've all earned it! -->

Have you turned it off and on again? Russia's Nauka module just about makes it to the ISS

slimshady76
Boffin

There are still 11 spacewalks, spread over the next 7 months, to connect the nauka module to the electric and hydraulic systems of the Russian ISS segment before the cosmonauts could feel at home there.

This isn't the equivalent of mating your roulotte to the hitch of your Ford and connecting the stop/turn lights' wires. Or maybe it is, but at a massive scale.

Malaysian Police crush crypto-mining kit to punish electricity thieves

slimshady76

Re: Ecological vandalism

I for one would love to buy a decent GPU at a decent, not inflated price. Illegal mining rigs confiscation could certainly help both to enlarge the government acs and help random blokes score a new GPU...

NASA fixes Hubble Space Telescope using backup power supply unit, payload computer

slimshady76

Bedazzler anonymous?

Teen turned away from roller rink after AI wrongly identifies her as banned troublemaker

slimshady76

Re: Using it wrongly

There's enough evidence out there about how facial recognition software is trained with a marked bias against non-caucasian population. If you live in a territory with significant non-caucasian population, I'd say it's a non-adequate choice to use it.

Boffins find an 'actionable clock' hiding in your blood, ticking away to your death

slimshady76
Joke

Re: So? What's his secret?

Quick! Somebody get the guy a ticket to Discworld!!!

With a straight face, Putin agrees to do something about ransomware coming out of Russia, apparently

slimshady76

It is said Perón took this phrase from Napoleon, who took it himself from Joan D'Arc: "If you want something to stop working, just form a committee". I find it pretty fitting here.

Radioactive hybrid terror pigs have made themselves a home in Fukushima's exclusion zone

slimshady76
Alert

Re: If Marvel taught us anything

Should that happen, here I predict Roger Waters will re-join Pink Floyd for a final Animals concert nearby the Fukushima nuclear plant.

Former NASA astronaut and Shuttle boss weigh in on fixing Hubble Space Telescope

slimshady76
Alert

Re: So you're telling me there's a chance

There's also the issue of maintainig the relative positions of HST and the capsule/launch vehicle. I guess a cable tether could work in a pich, but moving between them would still be at least risky... The Canadarm provided both a stationary framework and a mean to "crawl" between the shuttle and the HST.

Roger Waters tells Facebook CEO to Zuck off after 'huge' song rights request

slimshady76
FAIL

Re: Did he really say this?

Here in Argentina the libertarian asshats used an Another Brick In The Wall cover to claim for the return of the children to the schools when we were in lockdown... They never got to understand the lyrics, just picked up the song for the music...

slimshady76

Re: Money...

Back when Waters brought The Wall to Argentina, my wife spent a whole lot of money to get me a perfect seat at the concert (it was my birthday present). It was totally worth it: the River Stadium is so big they would be able to put out the longer, bigger wall, and the quadraponic sound really played well in it (I had already seen Waters there back at the In The Flesh tour).

I even picked up the location, knowing I would be exactly in front of the place where they hollowed the wall to show Pinky's room... It was perfect! Until the very moment when the music started. We have all seen the myriad of phones/cameras held up in front of us for those fools trying to capture a tiny, ill-sounded, shaky memory...

But the guy in front of me was shorter than myself, and HE RAISED A FUCKING IPAD. Right in front of my face. I had the best seat in the concert and I was staring at a goddamn Retina screen...

First reaction: grab the stupid 10-inch iPad and make it ingress into Mr. Short's anatomy at a place where it wasn't meant to do be. Second thought: I tapped his shoulder, and proceeded to point the HD cameras filming the concert, and asked him if he wanted to remember this unique experience as he saw it through the iPad's screen, or if he would enjoy the incomparable display of light, quadraphonic sound and effects through his own senses. Hell, he could buy a BluRay with a quality he wouldn't be able to achieve if he wanted to afterwards.

The guy looked at me, bafled, then put the iPad in his backpack, and thanked me for saving him from ostracizing himself from the experience The Wall was.

slimshady76

Re: Money...

A few years ago Pearl Jam cancelled a leg of their North American tour because a fan reached out for them in (anti)social media, complaining about the price of the tickets. The band had chosen to play more dates in smaller venues so they would get to be closer to the crowd, and apparently the company selling the tickets decided it was a great opportunity to take advantage of the supply/demand imbalance. So IIRC they sacked the tour organizers and went with a much more modest concert schedule, but a lower prices and in a much more familiar environment.

slimshady76

Re: Not Now John

Dunroamin, Duncarin, Dunlivin

Proof-of-space cryptocurrency Chia triggers HDD sales boom in Europe

slimshady76
Childcatcher

Re: GPUs

See, that's the issue. Most of the folk jumping late on the BTC bandwagon are in fact idiots who believe they will get rich in a week if they grab an off the shelf mid-pack NVidia GPU and set it to mine 24/7. That's what driven their prices up.

Icon because I can't find a decently priced GPU for my son's new PC.

Today I shall explain how dual monitors work using the medium of interpretive dance

slimshady76
Holmes

Re: Laptop + Monitor = two computers?

What about dealing with users who set their virtual desktop bigger than their screen resolution? I had one of those "Honey, I shrunk the kids" moments thanks to one of such folks a long time ago.

In the end (after an equally physical demonstration, involving the stunned user looking through a paper towel cardboard cylinder onto a printed A4 sheet, and moving closer and farther away to simulate the desktop size changing) he liked it because he was able to hide his naughty Netscape instance away in a corner, while leaving the work-lrelated one in the opposite one.

US nuclear weapon bunker security secrets spill from online flashcards since 2013

slimshady76
Joke

Re: Staffing these sensitive sites with young people is also an invitation for fun

Ask yer mum!

Apple's macOS is sub-par for security, Apple exec Craig Federighi tells Epic trial

slimshady76
Gimp

Time for some Apple fanboi flogging...

Imma go send this post to a couple apple fanbois and watch them throw their hearts out...

‘Staggering’ cost of vintage Sun workstations sees OpenSolaris-fork Illumos drop SPARC support

slimshady76

Re: Solaris alltogether needs to die

Yup, but at the time I was a junior SysAdmin with no authority to reply to the architect/head SysAdmin. I'd certainly send him to RTFM before designing anything nowadays.

slimshady76
Pint

Re: Solaris alltogether needs to die

Back in the day when I entered the corporate IT world, Solaris 10 was at its peak. ZFS was a distant ship on the horizon, disk slicing was necessary -seasoned with some Veritas to make the life of a SysAdmin bearable- and the separation of the swap space and /tmp wasn't a requirement of the design documents put together by The Powers That Be. Mount some development zones on top with mediocre coders messing with them and you have a recipe for disaster.

Not to mention the comparative cost of operation for a comparable POWER frame was lower and you had effective VM separation, instead of those early attempts of containerization called "zones".

I'm not denying Solaris was a foundational piece in some of the technologies we enjoy today, but some of its core requirements (maintaining backwards compatibility with obsolete prior versions to name one) made it harder to administer than its rivals. Even more with some incompetent head architects. Let's face it: playing the old, tired card of "back in the day you really had to know your ways around $PIECE_OF_SOFTWARE" only speaks about your grumpyness.

And I'm not talking about dealing with a couple servers, of which you could eventually get to know every single quirk. I'm talking about ruling over three hundred physical servers, with LDOMs and zones so poorly distributed (dev/staging/prod on the same blade) you'd learn to hate Solaris the way I did.

Again, when we finally got off them and flew to AIX 6.1 and Red Hat with XFS support, we couldn't believe how much our SysSdmin lives changed.

Icon because I think a chat like this deserves to be enjoyed along a good one.

slimshady76
Flame

Solaris alltogether needs to die

I know a lot of folks have a soft spot for that polished turd, but it's just Stockholm syndrome. It was the most obnoxious piece of software I had the tragedy of dealing with. Oh, the LDOMs, the lack of (native) LVM support, all the disc slices nonsense, having the swap space and /tmp as one device, mixed with the SAN scan crap, "touch ./reconfigure sync sync reboot"...

I remember the day we moved to AIX and I couldn't believe how easy all that stuff was there... And then Linux adopted LVM natively, and better journalled filesystems came in!

Chinese rocket plunges into Indian Ocean, still lands sharp rebuke from NASA

slimshady76
Joke

Re: Party Time

I imagine the locals started shouting the island's name the minute they realized the rocket missed them "by this much" as Maxwell Smart would say...

The Starship has landed. Latest SpaceX test comes back to Earth without igniting fireballs

slimshady76
Alert

The China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology likes this comment.

Ah, you know what? Keep your crappy space station, we're gonna try to make our own, Russia tells world

slimshady76
Coat

Re: It does have a finite life

There you have it. We should just send Rosy the Robot from The Jettisons and call the day off!

Mine is the one with the copy of "Destination: Void" in the inner left pocket.

slimshady76

Re: It does have a finite life

I don't deny the benefits of manned exploration. However, I think we should keep them to a small portion of all the exploration efforts. The proposed future lunar outpost seems like a pretty stupid idea, more motivated by the "we have bigger balls than you" motto than by the desire to understand something else about our cosmic surroundings.

Let's face it, the ways we have to put living matter up to (and beyond) LEO sucks. Loosely quoting Steve Buscemi in Armaggeddon, we are sending people on top of a humongous amount of heavily flammable fuel, built by the lowest bidding contractor.

As I said before, I think we're bound to become an interplanetary society somewhere in our distant future. I still however think we can learn a lot more from unmanned exploration. Hopping up there every now and then IS valuable and desirable! However, having a bunch of people floating around for so long isn't neither practical nor acceptable from a health perspective.

slimshady76

Re: It does have a finite life

Your grampa was still living on this planet, surrounded by air, water, a natural protective shield against cosmic radiation, and not suffering from premature osteoporosis. Maintaining a human outpost out there is expensive, risky and does not return as much scientific knowledge as a robotic mission on the long term.

If anything, the main contribution of 20 something years of human presence on LEO was the confirmation of how complex it is to maintain us alive in such a harsh environment.

It's okay to quote Kennedy on why we choose to go outside our own planet, but once we proved we can do it, it's even better to keep sending probes who are able to stay longer and send data back to where we have all the necessary instruments to analyze it and gain much better insight from it. It might not be as romantic or thrilling as watching some fleshbag trotting on some extraterrestrial surface, but it still is the best way to know our cosmic neighborhood better, and ultimately decide where we should send our next manned expedition.

George Clooney of IT: Dribbling disaster and damp disk warnings scare the life out of innocent user

slimshady76

Re: Not a prank...

The guy preferred to start from scratch instead of fixing bugs/adjusting code. Let's just say reinventing the wheel every time you need one isn't a good development strategy.... And that's why our coding partnering went no further than this venture.

slimshady76

Not a prank...

... but I once (a looong time ago) worked on a small software project with a friend who'd lose his nerve so easily I had to find a way to prevent him from rm -rf the whole dev tree if something didn't compile. So after giving up on explaining him how his development method would essentially mean we might never finish the project, I resorted to locking him off the root user and randomly aliasing/renaming rm and other potentially dangerous commands before he punched in. He cursed and bitched like a sailor for a couple of days, but in the end he accepted his inability to delete stuff.

Satellite collision anticipated by EU space agency fails to materialize... for now at least

slimshady76
Joke

Re: space lasers

Well, we clearly need to build a Dyson fish tank!!!

Vegas, baby! A Register reader gambles his software will beat the manual system

slimshady76
Coat

Trains and Airplanes are fairly entertaining too... Just saying...

Mine is the one with the "What to do in Las Vegas" travel guide in the inner pocket.

Out of this world: Listen to Perseverance rover fire its laser at Mars rocks as the wind whips around it

slimshady76

Re: Whispers in the wind

I'd be more concerned about the flat earthers going out and recording wind with their phones to prove Perseverance is just wondering on some lost Arizona desert patch.

Spotify to introduce lossless audio streaming: Better sound or inefficient gimmick?

slimshady76
Mushroom

Re: I think this is more important

You want the nuclear option eh? I see your Imagine Dragons and I raise you a Despacito:

https://youtu.be/kJQP7kiw5Fk

slimshady76

Re: I think this is more important

It's not just about the compression. Over its life, any music piece will be submitted to one or more "remasters", which ultimately means it will be loudified and compressed beyond recognition. Back at the start of the 90s my brother gave me Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon on CD for my birthday. It was an original, UK edition. A couple of years after that (and many, many joyful listening sessions) I handed it to a soon-to-be ex girlfriend, and ultimately forgot about it. So one day, after the millennium change, I craved for more DSotM once again, and went berserk trying to find another copy. I could only find a "remastered" version on CD, and with heavy cursing, I bought it. Shortly after I ran into my former girlfriend, and asked her for the CD. She gave it back to me, and I still use those two editions to show my fellow melomaniacs how a "remaster" by some half-assed, anonymous sound engineer could destroy the work of those involved in the creation of a masterpiece. This still holds true when talking about streaming. Original masters are chopped and chewed by who-knows-who and then spat into our ears.

TL/DR: As the singer from Gogol Bordello put it a few years ago, "We basically have a couple of generations who grew up listening to music on shit speakers".

How do we combat mass global misinformation? How about making the internet a little harder to use

slimshady76

Re: Sounds like a search bubble effect

I used to consider myself a pretty good Google searcher. This changes a few years ago, when the chocolate factory switched from ranking results with a few key words (i. e. "lava tunnel formation" versus "how is a lava tunnel built?") and then again last year, when the double quotes started to be useful to rank some word/expression higher than the rest.

What I'm seeing as results from every search is a switch from literal interpretation of the input to a more emotional one. As in when searching for a given topic you get news about what happened to somebody/how the topic affected someone, instead of the facts about that topic.

I call that the "social pollution" of the search results.

Facebook finally finds something it thinks is truly objectionable and needs to be taken offline: Apple

slimshady76
Black Helicopters

I see a phone platform driven by Fachobus is on the horizon.

The only way for Zuckershit to be able to monetize clicks/taps more efficently (and fence off any competition from Google or Apple) if the competitor's walled gardens start to lift up their walls would be to develop their own mobile gadget line. At a subsidized price, as Amazon has tried to do. The way I see it, the hardest thing to overcome would be convincing their target audience to be continually attached to their phones via several orifice-poking probes. Because as we know, if Tah Zuck™ invests so heavily into a physical device, he won't settle for any less than knowing your bowel movements, favourite snacks/beverages/medicine flavour, snot consistency and amount, etc.

You can drive a car with your feet, you can operate a sewing machine with your feet. Same goes for computers obviously

slimshady76

Re: New tech and old folk...

Yup, that's what I meant to highlight by writing UP in capitals. I Instantly realized how I was misleading the professor by saying it. In Spanish I replaced the "mueva el mouse hacia arriba"="move the mouse up" instruction with "deslice el mouse hacia el monitor"="slide the mouse towards the monitor".

slimshady76

New tech and old folk...

I believe I've shared this one before. Back at the late 90s I was the head of the IT deaprtment for a local Uni, and at one time the Dean brough a visiting Chilean professor into my lair. Before he escorted the venerable professor in, he reached me over the phone and stressed a lot the fact this particular professor was pretty much the definition of a luddite: he stil typed all of his papers/mail on a mechanical Olivetti typewriter, exchanged mail only over the snail/physical route, and if any electronic communications had to be had, he derived them to his secretary. "OK", I said "bring the folk in and we'll have him set up in no time!".

Enter the ederly, venerable professor. We had to set him up a local user, email account, give him access to several online resources, the internet proxy, etc. The venerable professor was in a very good mood to learn all the different procedures involved in our online campus: he listened, asked when in doubt, and cheered when we demonstrated a feature. Until the moment when I asked him to log in to the webmail interface. I presented him the entry webpage, and handed him the computer. He sat in, I instructed him to click on the "username" field, and waited. I anticipated he might face some trouble while getting used to the mouse, so I said "now, move the mouse UP until the pointer in the screen is positioned above the udername field". The pointer was still cemented to the lower part of the screen, and the professor complained "I'm moving it UP, but nothing happens!". I persisted, "move the mouse UP, and the pointer will do the same!" while looking at the screen.

This went back and forth for a couple of minutes, until one of my PFYs pat me in the shoulder with a funny face, and looked the way of the professor's rigth hand: he was lifting the mouse UP from the mouse pad, instead of rolling it towards the farthest part of it...

I took three deep breaths, gently held the professor's hand and lowered it to the mouse pad. Then, I proceeded to guide it towards the top of the mouse pad, positioned the pointer over the right text box, made his index finger click on it,and the let go off his hand. All without a word. The venerable professor looked me with a mix of wonder and surprise in his eyes, and then proceeded to type his username, roll the mouse closer to him, to position the pointer over the password field.

The only time I recall seeing such an amazement face on someone older than me was when I taught my -then- 61 years old aunt to ride a biclycle...

'We're storing how this material should behave': Boffins' 3cm 'm-bit' cubes demonstrate programmable wunderstuff

slimshady76
Coat

Now if they only could adapt the technology to Swiss cheese...

Imagine the implications! softer or harder cheese, without resorting to the arcane subterfuge of fire/heat!!!

Mine is the one with the Burrata in the inner left pocket.

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