* Posts by pavel.petrman

175 posts • joined 23 Mar 2017

Page:

To avoid that Titanic feeling, boffins create an unsinkable hydrophobic metal with laser power

pavel.petrman

Re: Hmmm...

“Run”

No. Never. Noooope. Nein!

pavel.petrman
Coat

Re: Hmmm...

Jesus Christ, that would have been something!

Google throws new version of Dart at the desktop, will be hoping it sticks with app devs

pavel.petrman

Re: Always bet on Javascript

May I recommend uMatrix? I started with NoScript long ago and graduated to uMatrix not long after that - it allows you to set site specific rules, so that you don't have to allow some Google shenanigans globally in case one critical webpage refuses to work without it. You can even save your preset rules permanently and export your preferences to a backup file. All in all it makes for much more pleasant browsing while being much more potent at disabling unwanted content (cookies, frames, tracking images etc. as well).

pavel.petrman

Re: Hobbyists and workers

Any chance that your JavaScript2 based program used JPEG2000 as default image format? Oh my hopes, sweet hopes...

pavel.petrman

Hobbyists and workers

There has never been a shortage of languages whose authors meant well and said languages were nice towards programmers and computers alike. A common property of these languages has always been a very certain not catching on. An interesting academic exercise and a thing for language theorists and assorted computer hobbyists. Whereas all the doers have always seemed to stick with the likes of c's, c++es and javascripts (fortran and cobol being actually nice in their times remain somewhat off this list). With javascript, the same, sadly, goes for all those vues and angulars. There is yet to come a first like of Qt into the web landscape (and when it does, I'm sure many a champagne will be popped).

So thank you google for your efforts, they haven't gone unnoticed. They sure brightened the morning for one or three us labourers, before we dive into our undefined behaviours and tripple equality operators once again today and tomorrow and the day after that, only to retire every evening to our dvds and vhses, toasting with a driest gin to beta, laserdisc and dart.

Linux kernel is getting more reliable, says Linus Torvalds. Plus: What do you need to do to be him?

pavel.petrman

I'm grateful we have Linus and his doings. The man seems unwilling to sell his soul to the devil, a rare occurrence.

I'm not Boeing anywhere near that: Coder whizz heads off jumbo-sized maintenance snafu

pavel.petrman

Re: Modern

Maintenance of an airliner supported by a mainframe computer just got much more colorful in my eyes!

pavel.petrman

Re: Modern

I was being sarcastic, which is hard to read in a short text without an appropriate icon.

pavel.petrman

Re: Modern

My apologies. In my thin and loudly coloured book everything which is not a tablet or a cloud must most certainly be a relic of the past and therefore a mainframe.

pavel.petrman

Modern

Thank the general almighty entity that commercial flying has been thoroughly modernised since! Instead of the maintenance manual on a mainframe we now have pilots calculating take off weight distribution and other vital figures on their airline-issued ipads.

Pentagon beams down $10bn JEDI contract to Microsoft: Windows giant beats off Bezos

pavel.petrman

Re: Bad week for Bezos

One has to wonder how much cash do actually the likes of Bill and Jeff need.

I once read a memoir of a pre-war European president who said that the best thing about the presidency for his civil existence was that he no longer needed to carry cash around as every human need was provided for. Which brings the question of how much of their times are these men on their own, outside their corporate existences which would seemingly require much more than 24 hours a day every day from us, only somewhat capable humans.

FBI extends voting security push, LA court hacker goes down, and more D-Link failures

pavel.petrman

I'm torn

On one hand, the typical impact security tools and parental controls, as well as make it harder for law enforcement to catch criminals sets of all the usual important bells in the heads of all sane netizens, but Google being behind the lamented technology offsets any lingo-based gains.

The bottom line is that every corporation will be MITMing all employee generated traffic in no time unless they are already doing so. At home the situation is different - virtually everyone is neck deep in Google already, so there is nothing to fear there. The remaining half percent will carry on being called tinfoil hats and everyone will be happy again.

Remember the 1980s? Oversized shoulder pads, Metal Mickey and... sticky keyboards?

pavel.petrman

PFY

I take delight in the fact that no one ever asks what PFY means. Sheds very positive light on Reg readership!

Hands off our phones, says Google: Radar-gesture-sensing Pixel 4 just $999 with a 3-year lifespan – great value!

pavel.petrman

Re: google is in a race with facebook

About the "google is in a race with facebook" - Google is winning by multiple lengths and is great at not making too much fuss about it as well. Look at it this way: it¨s very feasible to block Facebook completely at your firewall and it will get very little data about you (it still will courtesy of people around you, but very little of it actually). If you do the same with Google, two thirds of websites you visit from your well guarded Linux desktop computer will look hideously and the other third will get out of order completely. And that is just the web, you can't effectively avoid all the androids out there. Facebook is not winning.

In a touching show of solidarity with the NBA and Blizzard, Apple completely caves to China on HK protest app

pavel.petrman

Re: Slippery slope

We're already half way down indeed, and going fast and gaining speed.

FWIW Google do a good job remaining invisible on divisive topics (like for example Facebook getting all the flak for privacy intrusion) but they are still there and still doing business - there is no reason to believe they are any good when it comes to China.

Tearoff of Nottingham: University to lose chunk of IT dept to outsourcing

pavel.petrman

Re: The CEO resigned

People, cheifly those in managerial roles, and the CxO's more still than others, tend to forget that all we have now are computer businesses. Yes, theysometimes have some other machinery attached to the computers (like, baking ovens in the computer businesses formerly called bakeries, or big lorries in the computer businesses formerly called transportation companies). But forgetting this fact when you are a manager or worse the CEO herself, I see no other way out than it costing you your job.

Oh dear... AI models used to flag hate speech online are, er, racist against black people

pavel.petrman

Obligatory SMBC

This is what I would use to test whether the models are well trained or not!

Surprise! Copying crummy code from Stack Overflow leads to vulnerable GitHub jobs

pavel.petrman

Re: people will just copy and paste the first answer

DuckDuckGo will even show you the most upvoted or accepted answer (not sure which) on a prominent place in their own results page if your search phrase looks similar to a question on SO.

What? No way. Apple? Censoring iOS 13 to appease China? Gosh. How shocking. Who'd have thought it?

pavel.petrman
Coat

Re: SUBS! typo

Still not as bad as if they were human systemd abusers!

Nix to the mix: Chrome to block passive HTTP content swirled into HTTPS pages

pavel.petrman

Re: *GOOGLE* is worried about an attacker injecting tracking cookies?

Google are slowly but relentlessly walling up their garden and by the looks of it their garden is the whole web. Remember the great wall in one eastern country - it, too, was primarily not to let subject escape and only secondarily to protect the realm from invaders.

US games company Blizzard kowtows to Beijing by banning gamer who dared to bring up Hong Kong

pavel.petrman

Some saying they would stop playing the company’s games...

... and some, a tiny fraction of them, will actually do. For the rest, life goes on, the same as with Facebook zucking around with everything they can get on their users, Twitter selling phone numbers and Google privatizing the whole internet for themselves. And when the inevitable redacted hits the fan those who said they would stop would inevitably come after those who did with the historically proven "but come on help us out". Popcorn, anyone?

This won't end well. Microsoft's AI boffins unleash a bot that can generate fake comments for news articles

pavel.petrman

In sweet memory of Tay

the AI tweet robot from Microsoft.

Edge, Internet Explorer users Czech their settings after MSN 'forgot' their language

pavel.petrman
Joke

Cyber warfare

I say, the whole situation has recently been getting really out of hand in Middle East.

Pupil mental health monitor promises app rewrite after hardcoded login creds discovered

pavel.petrman

Re "the security needs to be as robust as the science"

I wouldn't bet on the latter either. Just because even fewer people understand it than who understand basic sanity in software development doesn't mean that there is some inherent robustness to it.

"Date require (...) algorithm to interpret it" - not this again. Something like my XLS files need a separately stored Excel to interpret them?

Google takes sole stand on privacy, rejects new rules for fear of 'authoritarian' review

pavel.petrman

"significant unnecessary chaos in the development of the web platform"

I hear China et al. are great at suppressing, erm, unnecessary chaos and are very good at creating stable and supportive environment for development. I hear some call it "stabilised society". There is apparently plenty to learn from them.

Quick!! The! top! five! things! you! want! to! see! from! Yahoo! – what! are! they!?

pavel.petrman

A technology studio on the intersection of consumer media and artificial intelligence

So Marissa is running a hipster barbershop these days?

BOFH: What's the Gnasher? Why, it's our heavy-duty macerator sewage pump

pavel.petrman

Re: Overhead sewers

Is it just me or does this previous place of employment of yours feature repeatedly in your comments under the BOFH, On Call and Who, me? articles? Keep them coming, please. One day I will visit the science adventure centre thinking about all the adventures you related here.

US government sues ex-IT guy for breaking his NDA (Yes, we mean Edward Snowden)

pavel.petrman

"breaching the trust placed in him"

... Yeah, right, ok. But now for a more pressing matter of making sure the state doesn't receive any monetary benefit from me as I have no trust whatsoever to put in it in the first place. How do I do that in a civil lawsuit?

Eco-activists arrested by Brit cops after threatening to close Heathrow with drones

pavel.petrman

Using consumer grade drones

... one of the latest pinnacles of availability of very sophisticated technology to complete morons which itself wouldn't be imaginable, let alone possible, hadn't it been for the decades of industrialization these people are so bent on protesting against.

Now please let me eat this tin of tuna to protest against overfishing our oceans!

Mike drop, DXC-ya later! Lawrie immediately ejects as CEO from IT outsourcing giant

pavel.petrman

Re: his pedigree

You mean his best reference being the CEO of Accenturd? Good thing he switched to a company whose name is all Capita-l letters.

pavel.petrman

Re: 404 - page not found

https://www.dxc.technology/governance/ds/135976/147324-mike_lawrie_biography

What goes up must come down, and that applies to the server market in Q2 too

pavel.petrman

What the hell is ODM Inspur?

Am I the only one here who has never heard of them, even though they appear to be bigger than Lenovo?

The time a Commodore CDTV disc proved its worth as something other than a coaster

pavel.petrman

Re: BAUD

Understanding what baud rate is as important today as it has always been as we, humanity, now require kitten videos streamed on demand in 4K over the air, which necessitates the likes of 1024-QAM and other unworldly modulations achieving more bits per symbol over the air than what was feasible mere years ago over tv cables. Very interesting stuff!

Suspected crypto-coin crook collared after emailing apology note to the cops rather than victim – shock claim

pavel.petrman

Re: If this is first-degree identity theft,

The perpetrator just happened to steal a first degree identity, you see. Had he been less lucky, he might have stolen a second or even a third degree identity, of which airports seem to be full these days.

Business PC sales up as suits flee looming end of support for Windows 7

pavel.petrman

Re: "Pro" for business? Hardly

re "no way to know" - yes there is. But you don't want to as it is bad news in every single case.

(The last one I remember is uploading chunks of memory to MS base star regardless of content, be it your confidential documents, browser cache or private keys. Of course when done properly your private keys should be kept safe by the OS but who does security properly nowadays?).

Today in tortured tech analogies: Mozilla lets Firefox loose in the hen house, and by hen house, we mean the tracking cookie jar, er...

pavel.petrman

Good job getting rid of the tracking cookies

... except that the big players in the unauthenticated part of the Web (of which there is a whole one, compared to a one in the authenticated part - you've guessed the names all right) don't need any cookies anymore. Given they own pretty much all of the infrastructure (other people's OS's and websites, in other words) and the cheapness of behavioral fingerprinting, they actually don't need the feared browser fingerprinting either.

The whole fight against tracking cookies reminds me of the famous React OS in which we can now reliably run mspaint.exe from Windows 98 to avoid the licensing and slurping woes of Windows 10. Well meant, and big kudos from me to all the people who made this possible (often in their leisure time), since it shows that there are still people who do care. But it is important nevertheless to stay current and understand that the big bags of sweet sweet dollars have already moved elsewhere some time ago.

Mozilla says Firefox won't defang ad blockers – unlike a certain ad-giant browser

pavel.petrman

Re: Firefox developers see wide open goal

Because 30% of people are more or less dim witted, 50% can't be bothered, 10% are active Duning-Krugers and 5% are fans of Google no matter what.

Dropbox would rather write code twice than try to make C++ work on both iOS and Android

pavel.petrman

Re: Dropbox failed the "not invented here" test

Maybe they just fiugured that Qt commercial license, costing several thousand (Pounds/Euro/Dollar) per seat, isn't a justified expense when you can have the LGPL options which is basically the same except for some tiny OS-specific bits. Yeah, right. The folks at Qt know what they get paid for and we, mere mortals, don't get to hear all their success stories. What we do get to hear are stories like this, happening at every other dev workplace every other week, where the thousands scare the managers as they would need to go from the department budget and not the HR/personnel budget. I have fond understanding for those poor souls mocked for their decision, as I have had my numerous times at the cost optimal end of the budget whip as well.

Header aches in Firefox, Tor, Brave and Chrome as HTTP opens new security holes

pavel.petrman

They haven't been particularly responsive

We have been trying to communicate with them, but they haven't been particularly responsive... And why would they? Google seems to be in full Microsoft-in-the-00's mode, owning their users fully and completely. It looks to me that the business model at Google is to own everything they can, build a nice walled garden for theis users subjects and fsck the rest. Which of course works nicely for everyone who expose themsevles to Google willingly or unwittingly. For the rest, though - tough luck. Just when the desktop alternatives became good enough for the average Joe, there is a new plague in store for us.

Researchers peer into crystal ball to see future where everyone's ID is tied to their smartphone

pavel.petrman

Re: Optional

The rest will become nonpersons.

Tor pedos torpedoed again, this time Feds torpedo four Tor pedos – and keep how they unmasked dark-web scumbags under wraps

pavel.petrman

The group used encryption and cryptography

A job well done, let the perpetrators serve the whole time please.

But I can't not notice the wording of group used "other advanced technological means to thwart law enforcement efforts, including file encryption and cryptography" constructed to mean "encryption is a technological means for thwarting law enforcement". They are selling the backdoor business hard, aren't they. Apart from Tor & al hardly ever becoming subject to what is poised to amount to legal prohibition of encrypted communication, these days pushed for all around the western cultural hemisphere ever so actively and forcefully. This one cloud has a pitch black lining indeed.

What do Windows 10 and Uber or Lyft have in common? One bad driver can really ruin your day. And 40 can totally ruin your month

pavel.petrman

Re: Driver Signing

You may or may not have a point there but we'll never know. Caps and exclamation mark abuse come across as positively as "Now I have your attention" and "We value your privacy", upon reaching which any gentleman will read no further.

'Transformation' at Capita: Profits? Down. Revenue? Down. Order book? You guessed it

pavel.petrman

Opportunity for growth

As I understand it, the opportunity for growth is great in terms of Capita's credentials since they can't effectively shrink any more.About the client base the opportunities are not plenty as there is only a limited number of Her Majesty's Governments available.

OK, Google. We've got just the gesture for you: Hand-tracking Project Soli coming to Pixel 4

pavel.petrman

I'm quite surprised they announced it at all

It would have been more along Google's lines to have it built in and keep it on at all times, only to say "sorry we forgot to mention it, of course it is there and always on, why shouldn't it?" when caught. Because of course the gesture control is only there to comfort the easily misguided masses, the real purpose if better situational awareness and more complete coverage of the vast network of slurping devices.

It's official: Deploying Facebook's 'Like' button on your website makes you a joint data slurper

pavel.petrman

How about the "Web Analyst" business now?

There is hardly a website worth visiting without the dreadful Google Analytics et al in it (which in turn makes many of said websites hardly worth visiting). Some declare it somewhere deep in their "we value your privacy" bullsh documentation, most do not. Yet there is no simple way for the web-browsing person to avoid being slurped naked (on desktop that is, on Andorid or other tablets the resistance is completely futile). I, for one, would love to see this practice addressed by authorities, and this development about the F-button goes in the right direction.

Cloudflare gave everyone a 30-minute break from a chunk of the internet yesterday: Here's how they did it

pavel.petrman

Re: This is the other meaning of "Serverless Computing"

Or is the internetless computing becoming a thing? As a service, of course.

Poetic justice: Mum funnels £100 into claw machine to win single Dumbo teddy for her kid

pavel.petrman

Here's one

How about every citizen everywhere is given a hundred tokens in the shape and weight of local currency accepted by machines such as the one mentioned in this artice. Every citizen will be then allowed to cast their vote in the next election if and only if said citizen presents the whole of hundred tokens to the voting comittee. I strongly suspect a voting right would have been lost quite willingly over one lousy teddy bear here.

Facebook staff sarin for a bad day: Suspected chemical weapon parcel sent to Silicon Valley HQ

pavel.petrman

Re: Room at the Top (Priority)?

Perhaps every priority is their top priority. Am I hearing John Cleese here?

In Rust we trust: Brave smashes speed limit after rewriting ad-block engine in super-lang

pavel.petrman

Regarding "not sure if MS has got its act together"

Well, performance is acceptable to very good. Only MSVC still comes from Microsoft which means tons of little pain-in-the-arse moments whenever a new version comes out (they keep switching back and forth in some important and impactful areas).

You're not Boeing to believe this, but... Another deadly 737 Max control bug found

pavel.petrman

Re: Ensuring that all code is tested

When my father was learning to drive a passenger bus many many years ago, the actual driving lessons were organized in groups. at the beginning of the first drive the instructor would ask who wanted to drive first. After someone volunteered, he'd order the rest of the group to stand in the aisle. With their hands in their pockets.

The problem today is that there is no single driver anymore so there is no way to get the required level of peer pressure to work.

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