* Posts by timrowledge

169 publicly visible posts • joined 11 Oct 2016

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Starting over: Rebooting the OS stack for fun and profit

timrowledge

Almost exclusively Squeak, occasionally Cuis (a fork focussing on quality vector graphics and some new ui ideas), very occasionally Pharo (another fork focussing on some ideas about pushing boundaries and production). Very rarely, Visual Works but I’m not really pleased with how it has changed since I was the engineering manager back in the 90s.

timrowledge

Re: No. Sorry, just /no/.

No, I suspect you inferred ‘operating’ in front of ‘system ‘ in my comment. Just as C has no language constructs for I/o (well, it didn’t last time I had to use it, who knows these days) Smalltalk needs no language construct for ownership etc. The system written in it can have whatever you want. And yes, perhaps some VM support would be nice, but we’ve done that plenty of times before.

Also I think you’re forgetting that in practical usage we do still run Smalltalk on an OS and make use of that OS. The trick is to try to make it easy to do everything from within Smalltalk. We do fairly well but not perfect.

timrowledge

On a Raspberry Pi 5 (not even one with an NVME hat) my working Smalltalk image goes from d-click to ready to start typing in essentially no time - an eyeblink at most. It includes all the development tools, code browsing tools - that use proper antialiased, proportionally spaced fonts, compiler, a bunch of games, a web application development system, documentation system, web server framework, code & version management system, graphics libraries, database connectivity (Postgres in this particular instances)... everything. Bang, there, ready. If I need to copy it across to a different machine - maybe my x64 Ubuntu-box, or a colleague’s Widows machine, or a Mac, it will work identically on that.

It just makes sense.

timrowledge

Re: Well, at least this reminded me to have a play

Load a copy of Squeak (from Squeak dot .org) on your Pi and read a few books (legally) downloaded from http://stephane.ducasse.free.fr/FreeBooks.html and/or watch some relevant YouTube videos. And join the Squeak mailing list.

I’ve been making a living with Smalltalk (almost entirely on ARM) for a tad over 40 years and any time I have to spend on nasty textfile languages is anathema. Just today I had to poke at a Python program to fix a problem and.. no, just no. That is so very not the way to do it.

timrowledge

Re: No. Sorry, just /no/.

“environments such as Smalltalk and Lisp suffer from not having per-object ownership and access rights”

I claim that

A) this is not something ones suffers from. It’s my objects. Nobody else gets to play there.

B) this is not something for the language to handle, it would be for the system

C) pretty sure gemstone can provide it

timrowledge

Re: Hit-and-Miss

Smalltalk can do version control perfectly well, thank you very much. For code centric uses, there is Monticello, or changesets, or Tonel/git, or Pundles and so forth. For more info centric needs people have made assorted solutions ranging from simple to expansive (gemstone, for example).

I mean, seriously, if it couldn’t, how could so many important ideas have been originated in it?

timrowledge

Re: The argument for keeping different horses for different courses runs thus...

Evidently you’ve not heard of Gemstone. A vastly capable database Smalltalk. Gemtalksystems dot com.

Venus has a quasi-moon and it's just been named 'Zoozve' for a sweet reason

timrowledge

Re: Our Moon Is A “Quasi-Moon”, Too

Let’s not forget Cruithne

NASA, Lockheed Martin reveal subtly supersonic X-59 plane

timrowledge

Re: Slow down

Insurrection is a fundamentally political offence. It’s an internal equivalent of treason. It’s selling out the polity in order to improperly take control.

Road to Removal: A blueprint for yanking billions of tons of CO2 out of our atmosphere

timrowledge

Re: start preparing ourselves for an inevitable further rise in sea level

Another good thing about Canada is that we won’t be letting you in

timrowledge

Re: Population reduction

Could somebody please reboot the LLM software behind this “user” account? It’s clearly absorbed too much trash from the wingnutosphere and gone full Reich

timrowledge

Re: That's some weapons grade disinformation...

This level of wrongness must surely take immense effort to achieve. Unless of course you’re simply pasting prepared bullshit from your Oil Shill Club sources.

timrowledge

Re: start preparing ourselves for an inevitable further rise in sea level

You’re not going to be moving north into Canada; the Canadian Shield geology pretty much has no soil. Do explain how you expect to grow food .

War of the workstations: How the lowest bidders shaped today's tech landscape

timrowledge

Re: Survival characteristics

“I don't care for Smalltalk, which in its original form contains an idiotic decision to color-code source code”

No it didn’t. The original Smalltalk couldn’t have, since it ran monochrome. Stop bullshitting.

Many modern Smalltalk systems *can* syntax if you want them to. And if you don’t, then set the preferences to not do it.

timrowledge

Re: A lot of design points were being explored at that time

You should perhaps take a look at the debuggers we have now.

timrowledge

Re: A lot of design points were being explored at that time

"those ancient Lisp and Smalltalk workstations had limitations: they were single-processor and single threaded "

Single processor, yes mostly - there were exceptions. Single threaded - nonsense. Smalltalk has had multi-threaded execution since.. well almost forever.

timrowledge

Re: What Is A “Workstation”?

"And of course, rebooting didn’t help, because the change was permanently made to your system VM image."

No; just no. That's not what happened then, and not what happens now.

timrowledge

Re: What Is A “Workstation”?

Y'what? That is total and utter nonsense. Smalltalk has *always* been able to pass code around. From simple text files, to imagesegments, to Monticello packages, to the git based system Pharo uses, Envy, Metacello... How the hell did you think we share and collaborate?

timrowledge

Re: Dynamic Languages

Smalltalk is the only language good enough to be worth the effort of critiquing. The rest are just dead text in dreary files. Don't waste your time; you only have so much of it.

Shame about those wildfires. We'll just let the fossil fuel giants off the hook, then?

timrowledge

Congratulations on the stupidest thing I’ve seen so far today

Car dealers openly beg Biden to put brakes on electric vehicle drive

timrowledge

Re: The problem is unchanged

“But I have to drive 2500 miles each way to work, twice a day because I work split shifts, towing a 42ft boat made of Iridium”

timrowledge

Re: EVs not selling?

Funny; there a *lot* of Tesla’s of various vintage around here and they all seem to make their owners pretty happy. I’ve never yet seen one with dodgy panel gaps, or who pay wheels, or any other problem beyond being a bit expensive up front. And even that is reducing.

timrowledge

Re: EVs not selling?

No it’s not just you. There are lots of people being just as dumb.

timrowledge

Re: Interesting lines from the article

Well at least they’re not attempting to steal the country like the previous maladministration did.

Maverick Mars chopper has survived way past its warranty – now it's time for a sequel

timrowledge

Re: Mk 2 feature

Given that Mars is the only planet where all the Linux sound systems actually work, that might be doable

BOFH: Monitor mount moans end in Beancounter beatdown

timrowledge

Re: Been there as well

I occasionally point people at the old Byte August 1981 edition (https://archive.org/details/byte-magazine-1981-08/page/n296/mode/1up?view=theater) to introduce them to Smalltalk, but it has the secondary value of having hilarious pricing.

For example, 64Kb ram S100 bus cards for a mere $995. Osborne 1 a mere $1795. 300 baud modems just $799! Atari 800 with a whole 32k ram $759.

Arm grabs a slice of Raspberry Pi to sweeten relationship with IoT devs

timrowledge

Re: I remember when

It’s a computer. It has what you load it with. Want it set up to use as a modest desktop? OK. Want it set up as a NAS? OK. A 3D printer controller? Sure.

If you want an “educational workstation “ load one of the setups produced by a variety of groups that have put in work to make them. You have GPIO pins to drive a staggering list of cool doohickeys that can teach about sensors and motors and effectors and imagers and noise makers and hell, control a nuclear reactor.

timrowledge

Some time ago and memory may have corrupted but I could swear there were Silicon on Sapphire chips in orbit.

timrowledge

Re: Raspberry Pi Foundation has lost its way

What nonsense. They can offer $4 picos, $15 zero 2 Ws, $25 3A+, $35 1Gb 4, all the way up to the $80 Pi 5 8Gb. None of them count as “expensive for what they are “.

Revamped Raspberry Pi OS boasts Wayland desktop and improved imager tool

timrowledge

Re: They broke VNC

Funny, my Pi 5 works ok via RealVNC in either X or Wayland config

timrowledge

Re: embedded stystem development

So go to the immense trouble of running the raspi-config and swap to X

timrowledge

I’ve had one for a month or so now and it really is quite fast. For the benchmarks that matter to me it equals about 70% of my 3.9GHz iMac. Everything I need works ok, though the VNC server could usefully be faster.

Intel's PC chip ship is sinking with Arm-ada on the horizon

timrowledge

Re: No thanks

It’s the code that “locks down”, not the ARM. Try a real OS like RISC OS

timrowledge

Re: I do find myself wondering

Slow? Dire? Not in my universe.

Sorry Pat, but it's looking like Arm PCs are inevitable

timrowledge

Re: It's taken a long long time.

It did for me.

Still have the original prototype “A500” that started with an ARM1 and got updated to an ARM3 *wirh turbo mode*. Had A540, Risc PCs, StrongARM machines, Iyonix and now Pi. When I eventually need a new Mac it will be an ARM.

timrowledge

I’ve been using ARM desktops etc since 1986.

An x86 is a waste of perfectly good sand.

Workload written by student made millions, ran on unsupported hardware, with zero maintenance

timrowledge

Re: A quick question

Some of my Smalltalk from the early 80s is still in use, but folks like Dan Ingalls have code from circa 72 in there. And yes, still making a living from it.

timrowledge

Re: More personal.

Nah: software is only finished when the last customer dies.

ChatGPT's odds of getting code questions correct are worse than a coin flip

timrowledge

Re: Soooo....

At least at the beginning it was confidently telling people I was the British astronaut geologist in Apollo 17. Whilst also being in charge of MI5 in Cairo.

Tesla hackers turn to voltage glitching to unlock paywalled features

timrowledge

Re: I need heated seats like…

In -20C Canadian winter your arse would thank you.

Ultra-rare Apple sneakers from the 1990s on sale for $50,000

timrowledge

Re: What is it with people collecting modern. plastic shoes, anyway?

I think a lot of it is simply acquisition of money laundering tokens. Houses, artworks, somewhat unique or at least rare items like original iPhones etc are just symbols of value that can be exchanged with less chance of triggering tracing or taxing.

MIT discovery suggests a new class of superconductors

timrowledge

Re: Knok-nock, Neo

No - they broke it whilst trying to be gods in their own reality and had to settle for being ersatz god-like entities in the somewhat damaged one we occupy. This explains both Dark Energy and the unfathomable popularity of Farrago, Bozo, Drumpf, and related jackasses.

timrowledge

Re: "Room temperature"

Well I’d hope that making *really good* ice cream was high on that list

Two new Linux desktops – one with deep roots – come to Debian

timrowledge

Re: Thoughts from a [mostly] Windows user

“excellent Desktop environments,”?

I’ve never yet seen an excellent desktop on a Unix machine. But I’ve only been using Unix machines since ‘82 so I’m no expert.

timrowledge

Re: Beautiful? Really?

Grainy fonts? In RiscOS? You must have had some unusual settings. Until really high dpi screens arrived there really wasn’t any competition for ROS fonts. And don’t forget they worked on machines with barely any memory.

Techies all GUI-eyed as Xerox says goodbye to Palo Alto Research Center

timrowledge

Re: Need to cut them slack

For those interested in hearing from the people that *made* and *used* the Alto, consider joining the Computer History Museum's shindig tonight (April 26, 7pm PDT, see https://computerhistory.org/events/the-legendary-alto-and-research-at-the-edge) to hear from Butler Lampson, Alan Kay, Charles Simonyi, and others. I'd be there in person if I still lived in the valley.

timrowledge

Re: Companies Failing to Market and Profit from their Employees' Inventions

E-ink 'paper' is a completely different kettle of horses teeth.

timrowledge

Re: Need to cut them slack..RISC OS? Who?..

"I remember looking at it around 1990. RISC OS 2. It looked and acted like pretty much every other X- Windows based GUI floating around at the time in the US."

It really didn't. I was there too, doing UI research work in the UK (IBM UKSC and even at Martlesham!) and the US (ParcPlace! Interval Research! DEC WRL! HP labs!) and so on. Quite aside from anything else RISC OS was significantly faster than any X based UI, and was at least internally self-consistent - something none of the Xwindows systems seem to have mastered even today.

timrowledge

Re: Not for profit

Xerox made quite a bit of money from the invention of the laser printer. Even if you ignore the sales of actual printers, imagine the tonnage of toner and paper that resulted!

timrowledge

Re: Need to cut them slack

I don’t know what dipstick downvoted druck but seriously, he’s right. RISC OS was by far the best done GUI on any home machine for a very long time. All the current UIs could do with taking a long look at it.

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