* Posts by johnfbw

122 posts • joined 21 Aug 2015

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Bank manager tricked into handing $35m to scammers using fake 'deep voice' tech

johnfbw

It would be enough for your bank to say they weren't responsible and tell you you aren't getting the money back!

Oh! A surprise tour of the data centre! You shouldn't have. No, you really shouldn't have

johnfbw

were you working with the user UCAP at the time? He had a similar issue!

Get ready to make processes fit the software when shifting to SAP's cloud, users told

johnfbw

Re: Tread carefully here.

In the long run it is probably cheaper to change people (or at least the roles they do)

The number of companies I have been in where roles are massively duplicated is unbelievable, in some places roles exist that essentially unwind what someone else has done. A good holistic strategy should prevent this which means good business practices which suggests a solution might already be available.

Even if moving to a standardised solution is more expensive it could be cheaper in the long run due to decreased technical maintenance and increased throughput (and potentially non-IT resource savings)

johnfbw

Re: Tread carefully here.

Often if your processes don't nicely fit a given solution I think either 1) You chose the wrong software 2) Your processes aren't best practice

Highly customising a solution leads to massive heartache and often ends with political arguments and a system that doesn't work. I am a SAP Consultant and the areas I see the heavy customisation also seem to be the ones that argue they are different when they aren't really and have deep seated company issues.

Of course light customisation is almost essential in any business, but if you have to heavily customise there are other issues to look at

On this most auspicious of days, we ask: How many sysadmins does it take to change a lightbulb?

johnfbw

his phone seems to work fine

UK govt draws a blank over vaccine certification app – no really, the report is half-empty

johnfbw

I was a similar situation, but emigrated a little further.

Luckily the German doctors decided to 'fake' my first vaccination on the same day so I got my certificate.

Of course now both the NHS and the German vaccination centre now tell me I have pending appointments for a 2nd and 3rd final jab!

One good deed leads to a storm in an Exchange Server

johnfbw

He maybe at fault, but possibly not to blame. Perfect time for a little bit of education - at least he was trying to be useful

Now everyone can take in the sights and smells of a London tram station shut for 70 years

johnfbw

Hidden London

I've been on a couple of the Hidden London tours - Clapham and Down Street. They are interesting, but expensive. Apparently run by volunteers, so no idea where all the money goes

Blue passports, French service provider: Atos bags £21m UK Passport Office deal

johnfbw

Re: backdoor identity card

Basically using the passport as part of a 2FA like other countries do with their ID cards

johnfbw

Re: "become completely digital"

It might be controversial - but eventually the only way to do a lot of stuff should be online.

Almost everyone has access to a computer (often through a library).

22% of the UK don't have access to a landline so it more exclusionary to offer a phone number to do things

Microsoft flips request to port Visual Studio Tools for Office to .NET Core from 'Sure, we'll take a look' to 'No'

johnfbw

Wait, there were VSTO developers?

Former IT manager from Essex pleads guilty to defrauding the NHS of £800k

johnfbw

And didn't put the money into his personal bank account!

johnfbw

Re: VAT non payment

Companies don't declare which companies they purchased/sold stuff to/from - they just give a total so there is no way to do this kind of matching.

Of course with Making Tax Digital this is the aim, but it is extremely complex

iFixit slams Samsung's phone 'upcycling' scheme for falling short of what was promised

johnfbw

Re: Its a problem of volume

1.5billion? That is basically one for every 5 people on the planet

I tend to keep my phones till the battery dies (2years+) and they aren't cheap for me, that is 1 per 2.5 people like me. How the hell is everyone buying that many phones?

Ex-Geeks staff lose legal bid to claw back withheld training costs from final paycheques

johnfbw

The first thing I would do as a lawyer would be to argue that they weren't actually given the training at those rates or quantities

Did they actually receive 1 hour of 1 on 1 training each and every day (or almost an entire days training a week).

I would also argue that the trainers didn't actually cost £60/hour salary (because it is cost to company, not charge-out cost) - a salary of £100k+. This is also very easy for the company to prove.

If their lawyers tried to validate both these assumptions, they probably did genuinely receive their monies worth.

Of course if any of that time was spent in group meetings (or group trainings) or the developer was creating value for the company during the 'mentoring' then it might not be the case

UK reseller sues Microsoft for £270m in damages claiming prohibitive contracts choke off surplus Office licence supplies

johnfbw
Flame

Re: "Earlier this year it slashed the length of support perpetual licence holders could expect."

Devils advocate here. Perpetual for the life of the machine was their usual claim in the olden days.

Now machines last a lot longer and people aren't upgrading every 12 months

€121,000 YOGA Book Android is 'priced right' says Lenovo

johnfbw

Re: Been done before...

I was thinking it was actually £120.99 and someone accidentally pasted the price of the next item @8.79 into the same box

Microsoft announces a new Office for offline fans, slashes support, hikes the price

johnfbw

All companies suddenly switch to offline mode

Microsoft realises all its Onedrive features are driving customers away

Pop quiz: You've got a roomful of electrical equipment. How do you put out a fire?

johnfbw

Re: My manager used halon...

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-3002206/Ryanair-plane-makes-emergency-landing-Barcelona-fire-extinguisher-discharges.html

Google Cloud (over)Run: How a free trial experiment ended with a $72,000 bill overnight

johnfbw

Google managed the costs just fine

Their invoice went out as expected

Amazon's ad-hoc Ring, Echo mesh network can mooch off your neighbors' Wi-Fi if needed – and it's opt-out

johnfbw

Re: Interesting legality issue in the UK

you didn't get the email then? This is a very much 'opt-out' situation so there is no consent

johnfbw

unlikely to touch those on paid by usage tariffs

like in most countries that aren't first world?

America's largest radio telescope close to collapse as engineers race to fix fraying cables

johnfbw

Re: Send for Jodie Foster

Sean Bean has a lot to gain from it not falling!

Heavy-duty case closed: Peli tried to steal peli.co.uk from rightful owner, says Nominet

johnfbw

Re: Domain Camping

What do they say about deliberate trading in other people's trademarks?

johnfbw

Domain Camping

I thought domain camping was pretty much outlawed

They are outright advertising it - using this article!

http://peli.co.uk/

Three rips up call centre outsourcing contract with Capita 2+ years early

johnfbw

Re: So a piss poor service

The only call centre with such bad service that when I called up to renew my contract (knowing the offered deals) I decided to cancel

I'll give you my passwords if you investigate police corruption, accused missile systems leaker told cops

johnfbw

I was asked to sign the Official Secrets Act at the age of 14 for my work experience at National Savings. I don't remember having a MI5 check!!!

Windows Server robocopy to gain auto-compression ahead of big file moves

johnfbw

Of course they may have put in a precheck to see if the file was compressed in a known format - only a couple extra lines of code to save a bit of CPU (not sure how much bigger the already compressed files get - guessing not enough to significantly hurt the network)

India orders 180-day sprint to wire 46,000 villages

johnfbw

Lest certain members of the populace start smashing the kit whenever tensions rise

certainly saw that over here

Amazon bean-counter, her husband, father-in-law cough up $2.6m after SEC collars them on insider-trading rap

johnfbw

"I'm sure everyday-Americans do it and get away with it"

Probably not. Insider trading often doesn't provide massive returns - rather smaller quick one off returns (think 10-20% next week). The key limiter is the person must have a good understanding of the market, a trading account (possibly allowing complex betting) and lots of MONEY

Are you prepared to go to jail for 10% of your savings? Would you be if your life savings were £1,000?

Yet another twist for 2020: Google says Android 12 will make it easier to install alternative app stores

johnfbw

I would be happy if they let me authorise individual apps without allowing all. So I can trust my own apps without having to worry about accidentally installing virus.apk

(but then again I would like to sandbox certain data stealing ad generating apps to never have internet access but not know it was due to permissions)

Too many staff have privileged work accounts for no good reason, reckon IT bods

johnfbw

Need FX rates

@tfb I'm not sure you worked in finance. It isn't enough to just be confident the computer does something right all the time. How do you check? How do you project the future? How do you revalue assets? How do you do that one calc outside the system that every company has many of? How do you deal with joint venture.

FX rates are one of the basic tools here.

Also most users dont have access or ability to read audit trails - auditors would laugh at you for suggesting that as a business op.

I might forgive you if you confused market fx rates and operational company FX rates, but you work in finance so should know.

I have worked in finance and IT designing finance systems and most of them require FX exposure or it is so obvious what the rates are that securing them (beyond RO) is pointless

johnfbw

all too often the data you need, but aren't authorised to have is something very trivial (my company locks down FX rates because the guy who set it up didn't think) or is something that can easily be worked out - I can't see company set up in our ERP - but have table access in dev to see the same and it only shows things like company code currency and hierarchy which are public information anyway!

Samsung throws more frugal followers a bone* with cheaper Galaxy S20 Fanboi Fan Edition

johnfbw

5G for £699

But it won't be on sale...

Digital pregnancy testing sticks turn out to have very analogue internals when it comes to getting results

johnfbw

Re: Wastful - but unfortunaltly not uncommon

How many times are you planning on getting pregnant to need a non-reusable test?

CREST exam cheat-sheet scandal: New temp chairman at UK infosec body as lawyers and ex-copper get involved

johnfbw

2095 questions

With that many questions doesn't memorising the answers really become studying?

We've heard some made-up stories but this is ridiculous: Microsoft Flight Simulator, Bing erect huge skyscraper out of bad data

johnfbw

Re: Intentional Error?

@Ellipsis I think you missed the date OpenStreetMaps - the open source mapping site posted about it's copyright!

UK.gov announces review – not proper inquiry – into Fujitsu and Post Office's Horizon IT scandal

johnfbw

Re: Struggling to understand....

I haven't seen reported what the actual problem was - beyond missing money. Any lawyer worth his salt should have demanded supposed incoming cash vs actual incoming cash to see the values of differences. These should have been line item details so easily identifiable as erroneous.

Far-right leader walks free from court after conviction for refusing to hand his phone passcode over to police

johnfbw

Re: And the moral of this story is ...

The police would already have had all the information on his fellow racists (sorry 'members'), he had something else that they probably already knew he had.

Not that I am in support of warrantless searches - but I highly doubt he is an innocent man protecting his friends

Railway cables overpowered errant drone's compass and flung it back to terra firma

johnfbw

Re: "over localised regions of the bridge below"

Given the people concerned knew about the "Network Rail (Route Control and Air Operations)" (why does Network Rail have an air department - they can barely run the things on the ground!) and they were flying a £30k commercial drone I would assume they were either investigating the bridge or the rails so operation near them was essential

Rogue ADT tech spied on hundreds of customers in their homes via CCTV – including me, says teen girl

johnfbw

Re: "ADT failed to monitor consumers’ accounts"

How would ADT monitor logs? Checking bob@adt.com doesn't have access is one thing (though of course bob might own the house); but there is no way to tell bob@hotmail.com is not genuine.

Even cross referencing all the log on lists is impractical - corporate sites will have many identical users, security companies many have legitimate access across many sites, even someone owning multiple properties.

The only thing ADT can realistically do is make sure owners check who has access to their systems and possibly enforce an audit every 6 months (which would piss off most users)

You overstepped and infringed British sovereignty, Court of Appeal tells US in software companies' copyright battle

johnfbw

Re: @phogan

They probably thought it wasn't necessary. Samsung undoubtedly has a full set of LG, Sony and Apple phones in their labs. Oracle will probably have an SAP ERP and MS SQL departments. It is just an extreme form of market/product investigation.

The scary thing is you can be sued if your product is similar (Samsung vs iPhone) so you basically have to buy to check it isn't!

Openreach tells El Reg it'll kill off copper sales in 118 UK locations next year

johnfbw

Re: Not sure how they measure availability of FTTP

I have FTTP wires outside my house - I spoke to the guy working on them who confirmed that it was 100% possible to have FTTP 5m away in my house. It took me a year to convince BT that their system was wrong and I could in fact get it. 6 years later they still tell me I can't get it (even when I show them the picture of the fibre coming into my fibre modem!)

Lords: New IR35 off-payroll tax rules 'riddled with problems, unfairnesses, unintended consequences'

johnfbw

Re: Dividends

Employee benefits account for about a 40% increase in costs on a company, pension (10%), holiday inc public holidays (15%), sick days (5% - but very variable), health care (1-2%), maternity pay (up to 100%!!! but in reality 30-40% twice in 40 years - 1.5-2%), death benefits (1-2%), bonuses (0-20% depending on industry)

Then of course contractors need insurance and accountants (1-2%)

If a contractor is only earning 40% more than the person next to him, the tax advantages are effectively a risk adjustment on short term contract and no notice period

johnfbw

Don't declare ISA income

There is no need to declare income from ISA as it is not regarded as income

https://www.gov.uk/individual-savings-accounts/how-isas-work

"If you complete a tax return, you do not need to declare any ISA interest, income or capital gains on it."

Cloudflare dumps Google's reCAPTCHA, moves to hCaptcha as free ride ends (and something about privacy)

johnfbw

Re: Audio versions

"Pavement" is American for a road surface - whether it is paved or not

Ofcom waves DAB radio licences under local broadcasters' noses as FM switchoff debate smoulders again

johnfbw

Re: But........

That reset method seems to be the normal method for getting kids in the car.

We ready? Ignition on. Daddy I forgot something - ignition off - opens door -gets teddy bear - closes door - opens door cause he is a kid - ignition on (then repeat for each child/wife in the car)

Marriott Hotels hacked AGAIN: Two compromised employee logins abused to siphon off 5.2m guests' personal info

johnfbw

Re: 2FA FTW!

Geographic aware login probably wouldn't be sensible for a hotel app. It is literally for travelling - same with plane apps

2FA isn't a bad idea, until you remember that it is for travelling and you may not have service to allow you to unlock your door. (of course there are other ways)

Sunday: Australia is shocked UK would consider tracking mobile data to beat pandemic. Monday: Australia to deploy drone intimidation squads

johnfbw

The Rockefellers and Rothschild families are so old and rich some of the conspiracies surrounding them are probably true. Same goes for the Windsors, Kennedys and certainly the Trumps

johnfbw

Why would they need to secretly chip us? We voluntarily carry a phone around with us and a lot of countries require you to register your SIM card with the government

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