* Posts by Camberley4PQ

2 publicly visible posts • joined 13 Jan 2015

How will Ofcom reduce our reliance on BT if it won't break them up?

Camberley4PQ

Separation / funding

How would separating Openreach help? I can absolutely understand how it's highly attractive to BT's rivals, purely to inflict gratuitous damage on a competitor, but I don't see how it actually helps with the challenges of improving connectivity.

Re. cost, haven't you answered your own question: historically, Government paid for universal electricity and gas connections, and/or the incumbent suppliers were permitted to charge whatever necessary to recoup the costs from other customers. There isn't, I suggest, the appetite for either nowadays: taxpayers and urban customers would howl if either were pillaged to fund rural connectivity. Even your examples aren't complete, provision wasn't universal: try getting mains gas in a remote village, and see how far your cries about 'entitlement' and 'unfairness' get you. There are three options for investment:

1. Government-funded through general taxation.

2. Customer-funded by imposing excess charges on urban customers to subsidise rural customers.

3. Industry-funded, with long payback times (decade+), and regulation to prevent communications providers from clawing the money back from existing customers (otherwise this would be Option 2).

No communications providers other than BT have shown any appetite for (2) or (3). What does this tell you about the technical and commercial credibility of those advocating an magical FTTP Nirvana?...

Google crashes supposedly secure Aviator browser

Camberley4PQ

Re: Doesn't exonerate Google though

>"...from the moment you start Chrome [you can] "sign on". Features like url auto correct (via Google), and predictive search (via Google) are also enabled."

These are useful functions for me, the user. I'm computer-literate (e.g. MSc, work in IT), and I'm completely happy with the trade-off between convenience and privacy. I respect the fact that other people have different views, and good luck to them, but Google quite rightly tailor their product to the majority of people, most of whom apparently have broadly similar views to me:

www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-switch/wp/2014/10/07/people-care-more-about-convenience-than-privacy-online

www.darkreading.com/risk-management/online-privacy-we-just-dont-care/d/d-id/1110535?

I'd respectfully suggest that much of the criticism of Google is unfair: they're a business, providing superb products for no up-front cost. I'm happy with that, as are many/most people.