* Posts by vinyl1

16 posts • joined 25 Jul 2007

Mac ransomware author is giving away malicious code to script kiddies

vinyl1

How can they do this without the admin password?

I suppose they might be able to encrypt files the logged in user has R/W access to, but they couldn't encrypt any other files.

If you run your web browser on a 'nobody' account with no privileges, they couldn't even do that.

'I found the intern curled up on the data centre floor moaning'

vinyl1

Back in the 80s at a large US bank - well, Chase Manhattan - one of our application leads left, and she was replaced by another woman. They were both named Alla, although obviously they had different last names.

You can imagine what happened. The data center never updated the numbers of the call list, which listed only first names by systems supported. So when a job failed, they called the wrong Alla in the middle of the night, and she automatically debugged the job without even thinking about it, and went back to bed. If was only when operations talked to the right Alla the next morning that they realized their mistake. They were at least gents about it, and called the other Alla to apologize.

Guess who gets hit hard by IR35 tax clampdown? Yep, IT contractors

vinyl1

Parliament could simply pass a law legalizing individual contractors, and clearly stating what is allowed and not allowed, and what taxes must be paid. How hard is that?

It's not our fault we don't hire black people, says Facebook

vinyl1

Back in the 90s, I met a black guy who was an excellent C++ programmer.

He was quite happy being a contractor, and he had plenty of work. He told me he enjoyed being independent, and would never take a corporate job because of all the BS you have to put up with.

Which country has 2nd largest social welfare system in the world?

vinyl1

As I have pointed out in several comments, the bulk of the 'social welfare' spending is not actually received by the poor. It goes to social workers, teachers, and doctors who provide 'services' to the poor. The poor are not really in any position to complain about the low quality of these services, because they're not paying cash for them.

The actual money spend on food stamps, EITC, and section 8 housing is a small fraction of the social welfare spending. But even something like food stamps is immediately received by the grocery stores, and adds to their business and profits.

vinyl1

Re: More money !=more in return

But the teachers who make $90K a year in school districts were the graduates can't read and write, the doctors who make $300K a year treating the poor on Medicaid, the professors at big universities who teach one course for $200K....they all thank you for the money!

vinyl1

Re: Shirly the value for money, per cent spent, matters?

In many parts of the US, public transportation is wildly impractical. It there are 2000 people in your town, and the next town of 2000 people is 30 miles away, what would you expect?

vinyl1

Re: But the elephant in the room...

But these medical bankruptcies are not incurred by the bottom 10%. They are fully covered by Medicaid, and receive their medical care at no cost. They are much more like among the upper-middle classes, who are not eligible for social welfare

Expert chat: The end of Windows XP and IE6

vinyl1

This sort of upgrade can be very painful

It took my company 3 years to go from XP to Windows7. They had to test 40,000 applications, many of which had to be replaced because they could not be migrated. Some things still don't work.

Spotify spews 'unencrypted' FREE MP3s all over creation

vinyl1

MP3s are so low-quality that they are not even worth stealing.

I was recently able to hear double-DSD rips of studio master tapes - now that is music! I am not surprised the record companies won't release stuff like that. It has 128 times the bit density of CD.

Master Beats: Why doesn't audio quality matter these days?

vinyl1

It is ironic that audiophiles...

...have gone in the other direction. I was at the Chester Group audio show in New York a couple of weeks ago, and there were no systems on display under $100,000.

Of course, it's a show, they're going to show off their best stuff, but things have gotten out of hand. The sound was fabulous, but really.

Not only that, but the best music was private double-DSD rips of analogue studio master tapes, which of course are not available at all to consumers at any price. While 5.6 million bits a second can sound mighty good, there's no point to the equipment if no music is available.

Application management – how many apps do you have?

vinyl1

Persuading the end users is easy.

Just charge them what it costs!

We had a web system that tracked data quality issues. It had automated assignment, workflow, tickler emails, very nice. As long as it was free, the users really liked it.

But when we told them they would have to pay the actual cost of the system, $300,000 a year, then they said they'd rather keep track of their data quality problems on Excel spreadsheets.

Outsourcing suddenly less popular

vinyl1

Comanies are starting to ask...

.....whether is better to hire a competent employee here or 3 marginal ones in India for the same price.

They do have competent guys in India, but they are paid Western salaries by Google and Microsoft.

Birmingham drops the possessive apostrophe

vinyl1

Historically correct!

This is actually historically correct. You won't see any apostrophes in any ancient or medieval Germanic languages, or in Middle English. Why would you put an apostrophe between a noun and its case ending?

I believe the apostrophe was added by folk-etymologists in the 16th century.

American IT staffing will not tank in Q1

vinyl1

Some places are shuffling the deck

Good people are now available from companies that have closed down completely. Some of the surviving places are hiring from this pool, while at the same time getting rid of some of their less desirable employees.

So even if headcount stays constant, that doesn't mean no one is being let go.

Power outage knocks out major websites

vinyl1

Not surprising

Having spent 26 years in IT, I know that the one thing that is absolutely certain is that no matter what disaster recovery plans you have, they will not work when a real disaster occurs.

After 9/11, we discovered that all the copies of the disaster recovery procedures were kept in the building next to the World Trade Center, the one we had just fled.

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