* Posts by Bartholomew

523 publicly visible posts • joined 10 Dec 2013

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Supermicro plans to flood market with liquid-cooled datacenter tech

Bartholomew
Meh

So will it be water based cooling ?

No more Fluorinert and no more Novec, because 3M is to end all PFAS manufacturing by the end of 2025

(ref: https://news.3m.com/2022-12-20-3M-to-Exit-PFAS-Manufacturing-by-the-End-of-2025 )

Meta won't train AI on Euro posts after all, as watchdogs put their paws down

Bartholomew
Coat

Backroom thinking at facebook

You can bet your last dollar that Facebook are now thinking of something like this:

OK we legally can not train any AI on the data and information directly provided by humans in Europe. But ... now hear me out ... what if we train the AI on the metadata about our user in Europe, and we anonymise the source of the metadata could we sidestep any toxic GDPR fallout that way ? This way we may still manage to gain aggregated actionable information for advertisers that is at worst with the granularity of a city or region. But within Europe that may be more than our competitors, and that just may be enough to bump the bottom line.

Dr Ed Stone, former director of JPL, Voyager project scientist, dies at 88

Bartholomew
Meh

I do not think that there is a greater monument to the people who worked on voyager

Than probes that are mostly working after so many, I was about to say years, but lets just say light hours away instead.

Voyager 1: 22 hours, 34 minutes and 47.1978 seconds

Voyager 2: 18 hours, 51 minutes and 45.4800 seconds

Version 256 of systemd boasts '42% less Unix philosophy'

Bartholomew
Terminator

Re: How long before systemd ...

The origin story of the Borg!

Bartholomew
Meh

version 256 of systemd

Now with 42% more attack surface.

Bartholomew
Mushroom

It's the only way to be sure.

This is what happens when no one says "I say we take off and nuke the entire site from orbit."

Space health shocker: Astronauts return mostly fine

Bartholomew

Re: So spaceflight is good for you

> take with salt

I hope that is a low sodium, potassium based salt. Every human body is radioactive. And the primary natural source of that radiation is mostly from the near constant level of potassium maintained. Eat a banana, and your potassium level may spike for a short while (There is more potassium in the peel than the fruit we eat) but later on your body will automatically flush the excess away. Our bodies do need potassium to function, yet with a tiny fraction of potassium being a source of gamma rays, it is impressive how our bodies regulate the quantity maintained (110g to 137 g total potassium, of which 0.012% is K-40 so 0.013g to 0.016g distributed throughout the entire body and not concentrated in one area).

Gates-backed nuclear plant breaks ground without guarantee it'll have fuel

Bartholomew

Re: Depleted uranium as fuel?

> How exactly do you use depleted uranium as a fuel

Basic nuclear science 101:

U-238 (depleted uranium) is fertile! You can use one, or more, fuel source(s) to make U-238 into additional fuel. The fissioning of an atom of uranium-235 inside a reactor produces two to three neutrons, and these neutrons can be absorbed by uranium-238 to produce plutonium-239 and other isotopes. Plutonium-239 can also absorb neutrons and fission along with the uranium-235 inside a reactor.

Bartholomew

Re: Liquid Sodium. Really?

There were Supercritical carbon dioxide and liquid sodium chemical reaction experiments to elimination of the need to accommodate potential sodium-water reactions.

(ref: "Title: Supercritical carbon dioxide and liquid sodium chemical reaction experiments Authors: Craig Gerardi, Nathan Bremer, James J. Sienicki, Darius Lisowski and Christopher Grandy")

The Brayton cycle using Supercritical carbon dioxide is actually more efficient than using Supercritical steam, the low end temperature can be lower and the high end temperature can be higher, the greater area within the cycle means that more energy can be extracted from the same source of heat than by using Supercritical steam inside your turbine.

AI PC vendors gotta have their TOPS – but is this just the GHz wars all over again?

Bartholomew
Meh

Race to the bottom, how low can you go ?

Is a 1-bit NPU useful for anything at all ?

From a digital circuit design perspective dealing with 1-bit numbers would use approximately half the logic gates of 2-bit numbers. And 2-bit numbers would use roughly half the logic gates of dealing with 4-bit numbers. And 4-bit numbers would use roughly half the logic gates of dealing with 8-bit numbers.

So from a highest TOPS number boasting point of view any company could publish, if their hardware was able to support it, 1-bit TOPS and have eight times higher numbers than their 8-bit competition.

At Apple, AI stands for 'Apple Intelligence' – and it's coming to everything

Bartholomew
Mushroom

What could possibly go wrong ?

Only Mr. Flibble knows!

Rimmer : Mr. Flibble's very cross. You shouldn't have run away from him. What we going to do with them, Mr. Flibble?

[Mr. Flibble, a penguin glove puppet on Rimmer's hand, whispers in Rimmer's ear. Rimmer looks shocked]

Rimmer : We couldn't possibly do that. Who'd clear up the mess?

HP CEO: Printed pages are down 20% since pandemic

Bartholomew
Meh

I once did a tour of a HP printer research lab (University group)

The person bring round a group of us, was a HP lifer. He loved and was proud of everything. "And here we have these amazing light rooms that simulate sunlight and moonlight only 300 times more intense, and we can confirm that our pigments will look just as amazing in a century's time as they do the day that they are printed. "

"And here is where our bubble jet print heads are designed, they are a totally amazing feat of engineering, the plumbing alone inside them just so precise and only as complex they need to be, the temperature inside them for an instance gets hotter than the surface of the sun to spit out the finest spray of atomized inks."

And someone in the group asked about the markup on the toner and inks, and he had no issue in answering. "Our pigments are totally amazing and it shows with every single print, everyone who works on them from the development team to the testing group, these people are at the top of their game. So yea we charge a bit more, but a 5000 to 7000 percent markup on the raw materials is not unreasonable in this industry. Yes some people refill them any old junk. Here we love the bubble jets heads, they are complex enough that we do not have to do anything special after a few refills they will fail. They were designed to be the best that they could be but with a limited lifespan (I was thinking about Blade Runner when he said that). People always come back to us in the end."

Bartholomew

Re: Perhaps if printers WOULD ACTUALLY PRINT

Yea but ...

“Knowing where the trap is that's the first step in evading it.” - Frank Herbert, Dune

How many people know that pretty much every single printer prints the date, time along with the serial number multiple times (for redundancy, in case only a scrap of a page is recovered) on every single page produced. I am sure that there are people reading this that never knew, the ones complaining why a printer needs colour pigments when printing black and white.

And even if someone steals a printer, that does change the traceability of the paper trail. The plod have a series of high end printers stolen from Manchester, colour thermal wax and fusers stolen from Bedfordshire, and fake fivers (Lady Godivas) showing up in east London. It does not matter that it was stolen, they can track all the fake notes back to one or more printers and track those printer(s) back to a theft. They have a ground zero, an origin to start their investigation, which they would not have otherwise.

I'm not saying that full traceability is good, but it exists.

It use to be that cash was king, totally untraceable, these days every serial number is recorded every time it leaves a cash machine, or enters the banking system. It is amazing how much tracking goes on in the background, and it is not just cookies from websites.

Bartholomew
Big Brother

Re: Perhaps if printers WOULD ACTUALLY PRINT

Every black and white page printed needed access to all pigments to add the serial number secretly to every page! (ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_Identification_Code ).

When someone is doing something illegal at a massive scale, a page is eventually printed somewhere. And governments want the ability to track seized documents back to the source device(s). It might help understand the structure of an organisation.

Bartholomew
Big Brother

Re: Perhaps if printers WOULD ACTUALLY PRINT

> if you print black & white it uses up some colour ink

Yes, yes they do, usually yellow, for the "Tracking Dots" AKA "forensic tracking codes" (ref: https://www.eff.org/pages/list-printers-which-do-or-do-not-display-tracking-dots )

Defiant Microsoft pushes ahead with controversial Recall – tho as an opt-in

Bartholomew
Coat

Total Recall the film has the tag line "How would you know if someone stole your mind?"

There is already a tool available to dump your database in case you forget that username and password that you viewed onscreen once, at the wrong time. https://github.com/xaitax/TotalRecall

China's new sanctions loophole: Use export-controlled chips inside the US

Bartholomew
Meh

money to R&D

> trying to build a US chip industry that can keep it ahead of China

Funnel 3% of the GDP into R&D ( e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Research_and_development_in_Japan

This could probably be funded by blocking any corporate cheating. e.g. Boeing pumping up their stock price, with their profit to reduce tax payments - ultimately to make management with the right to exercised share options in the future at today's prices and big shareholder very very very very happy.

Sodium ion batteries: Yet another innovation poised to be dominated by China

Bartholomew

Re: Written while listening to to "Burning Down the House" by Talking Heads

The problem with natural Caesium is that it is almost not radioactive at all (there are microscopic traces of Caesium-135 in natural Caesium - but it is almost negligible compared to caesium-133, which is listed on Wikipedia as being 100%). Caesium need to be made radioactive through man made processes.

Surely you would choose Francium with a half life between 4.8 minutes and 22 minutes as your radioactively hot source "battery". But of course making, selling, and using a Francium battery in the time window allocated by nature would be an extreme challenge at any scale at all when half your atoms change after, at best, 22 minutes.

Bartholomew
Flame

Written while listening to to "Burning Down the House" by Talking Heads

David Banner wants to know, when will we have potassium batteries!

Sodium burns with a bright yellow flame in water/air. But potassium is so much cooler with its purple (and UV-C) flame in water/air. Oh and it is radioactive (0.01% potassium-40), Who does not love the idea of walking about with a concentrated personal gamma ray source in their handheld devices. Which reminds me, it is probably time for a banana - I feel like I am low in potassium!

Why RISC-V must get its messaging right on open standard vs open source

Bartholomew

> the ISA bus came out with the IBM PC and hasn't it been obsolete for years?

There was a LPC port (ref: Low Pin Count Interface Specification) used on some PC boards, typically LPC was used for communications with a plugin TPM (Trusted Platform Module)! LPC from a software standpoint looks like ISA! The pin out it different, but at it's heart is it ISA (only serial, instead of parallel)!

Bartholomew

Re: The fastest current RISC-V chips are Chinese anyway

XiangShan V3 (goal: 16.7 SPECint2k6/GHz, current simulations with RV64GCB: 14.7 SPECint2k6/GHz): High performance out-of-order core with RV64GCBV_Zbb_Zicond and 128-bit vectors, that is developed and validated by a Chinese university in collaboration with a bunch of industry-partners. The prior generates were taped out, and that's also the goal for this generation.

SiFive P670 (12 SPECint2k6/GHz, supposed to be comparable to the Cortex-A78): It's an out-of-order with RV64GCBV + vector crypto support and a 128-bit vector length with vector double-dispatch. It should be released with the SG2380 at the end of this year. The SG2380 has 16 P670 cores, as well as 4 SiFive X280 cores, that are used as an NPU. The X280s are in-order cores with 512-bit wide standard vector extension + custom in-vector register matmul extension, that can together supposedly achieve a total of 32 int8 TOPS.

China loves RISC-V and are investing in the future of RISC-V. What they are doing would be impossible in the west, it would be like ARM, AMD, NVIDIA, Intel, IBM and all the US technology universities all working together on the one CPU line. Is it crazy ?

By 2030, software developers will be using AI to cut their workload 'in half'

Bartholomew
Meh

Re: The academic view of software engineering

> If managers want a 50% improvement in software engineer productivity a good start would be getting rid of management meetings

I once worked on a massive software project with hundred of people working on each individual part it. And the closer to the FOA (First Office Application) deadline that the project came, the more meetings were scheduled. And I thought this was nuts, completely insane - to begin with! But everyone wanted to show some progress between meetings (up to 6 meetings day, sometimes lasting less than 5 minutes each, mostly just a quick roll through the names of people dialed in to say where they had progressed, if any, since the last meeting). So programmers would would quash bugs like crazy and some would still be working during the meeting, until their name was called for an update so that they could show that they had made some progress since the previous meeting. Even the testers wanted to show progress that bugs that were reported as fixed were confirmed as fixed. The quick and many meetings worked well, I was shocked. Everyone within a pod/module knew where everyone else was in that part of the project and where all the possible problems were. And I'm sure that there was inter pod/module meetings at a higher level were exactly the same things were happening, filtering up to higher and higher management.

That experience changed my view of meetings forever, rapid laser beam focused meetings - fantastic. Normal bull$#1+ bingo meetings, ©®@p.

Bartholomew
WTF?

I tried it to see if it would totally suck ... at generating 6502 assembly

My "simple" test was could ChatGPT generate 64-bit a pseudo-random number using a 64-bit Linear-feedback shift register for a 6502 CPU and oddly enough I'm totally shocked, the generated assembly code looks bang on to me. OK, I will admit that the last time I programmed 6502 machine code was about 40 years ago! But even now bad 6502 code would scream out at me - and it looks nearly perfect. I would tweak it a bit, but any flaw is because I told it what i expected, and my example code should have been better.

snippet of C code:

unsigned long lfsr = 1;

if (lfsr & 1) {

lfsr = (lfsr >> 1) ^ 0x800000000000000D;

} else {

lfsr = (lfsr >> 1);

}

(ref: LFSR @ Wikipedia and where I pilfered the C source code ). Here is the 6502 assembly generated by ChatGPT:

; Assuming the following:

; - lfsr is stored in memory starting at address $00 (lfsr0 is the LSB, lfsr7 is the MSB)

; - 0x800000000000000D is stored in memory starting at address $10 (xor_val0 is the LSB, xor_val7 is the MSB)

; - Temporary storage is available at $20 to $27

; - Zero page addresses are used for lfsr and xor_val for simplicity

; Initialize lfsr to 1

LDA #$01

STA lfsr0

LDA #$00

STA lfsr1

STA lfsr2

STA lfsr3

STA lfsr4

STA lfsr5

STA lfsr6

STA lfsr7

; Check if the LSB of lfsr is 1

LDA lfsr0

AND #$01

BEQ ShiftOnly ; If LSB is 0, jump to ShiftOnly

; Perform the XOR operation

ShiftXor:

; Right shift lfsr

LSR lfsr7

ROR lfsr6

ROR lfsr5

ROR lfsr4

ROR lfsr3

ROR lfsr2

ROR lfsr1

ROR lfsr0

; XOR with 0x800000000000000D

LDA lfsr0

EOR xor_val0

STA lfsr0

LDA lfsr1

EOR xor_val1

STA lfsr1

LDA lfsr2

EOR xor_val2

STA lfsr2

LDA lfsr3

EOR xor_val3

STA lfsr3

LDA lfsr4

EOR xor_val4

STA lfsr4

LDA lfsr5

EOR xor_val5

STA lfsr5

LDA lfsr6

EOR xor_val6

STA lfsr6

LDA lfsr7

EOR xor_val7

STA lfsr7

JMP Done

; Perform only the right shift

ShiftOnly:

LSR lfsr7

ROR lfsr6

ROR lfsr5

ROR lfsr4

ROR lfsr3

ROR lfsr2

ROR lfsr1

ROR lfsr0

Done:

; End of the operation

; Memory layout

lfsr0 = $00

lfsr1 = $01

lfsr2 = $02

lfsr3 = $03

lfsr4 = $04

lfsr5 = $05

lfsr6 = $06

lfsr7 = $07

xor_val0 = $10

xor_val1 = $11

xor_val2 = $12

xor_val3 = $13

xor_val4 = $14

xor_val5 = $15

xor_val6 = $16

xor_val7 = $17

All I asked ChatGPT was: convert this C code "unsigned long lfsr=1; if (lfsr & 1) { lfsr = (lfsr >> 1) ^ 0x800000000000000D; } else { lfsr = (lfsr >> 1); }" into 6502 assembly

Tape is so dead, 152.9 EB of LTO media shipped last year

Bartholomew
Meh

Long term storage to tape, takes more than just a bunch of tapes!

I can remember about 30 years ago being asked by a project manager for a copy of their teams project data (source code, binaries, development tools, ...) on tape(s), so that a final set of tapes could be stored long term (25+ years) at an underground storage location (under a mountain) in case any customers ever wanted/needed to bring the project back from the dead. I think it was DAT tapes back then, before LTO. And I always remember thinking, and pointing out at the time, that they should have 3 copies of each tape, and also archive with 3 tape drives, 3 servers, 3 copies of the backup software and three copies of the OS on the servers, and at least 9 client machines to be able to partially restore the environment in 25+ year time. But even though they did agree with my thinking, at least in principal, there was no allowance for that in the shutdown budget for the project. I really do wonder where those tapes are now, how long until DAT drives become Unobtainium. And I think that the development clients were sparc based, and they are nearly Unobtainium now! I guess with M.A.M.E. (M.E.S.S.), it would be possible to emulate some of the environment today. But it would not be easy.

The longer that a project is mothballed the harder it is to bring it back to life, even with one set of fully working tapes.

Was there no one at Microsoft who looked at Recall and said: This really, really sucks

Bartholomew
Meh

money for nothing and your metadata for free

Telemetry got swallowed, why would Microsoft even suspect that shoving recall down peoples throats would not.

The problem is that Microsoft looks at alphabet and sees how much metadata they harvest globally and are drooling. They want that sweet sweet sweet cradle to the grave metadata-hoard on everyone they can.

Micron told to pay $445M in memory patent infringement case

Bartholomew
Happy

Re: Eastern District of Texas: The patent troll capitol of the US

Or corporate mascots might be fun as well e.g.

Hamburglar, Ronald McDonald, Mickey Mouse, Mr. Peanut, Trix Rabbit, Spuds MacKenzie, Playboy rabbit, Michelin Man, Mario, Kermit the Frog, Green Giant, Energizer Bunny, Duracell Bunny, Budweiser Frogs and The Burger King.

I know that is than 15 jurors, but you need a few spare, imagine if the Coca-Cola polar bears shows up hungry.

Bartholomew

Re: Eastern District of Texas: The patent troll capitol of the US

> a jury of their peers

A jury made up of tech sector CEO's would be funny to see.

Manjaro 24 is Arch Linux for the rest of us

Bartholomew
Meh

> there is literally no user feedback on what's happened and so no clue where to even start on troubleshooting that one

My first step would be something like the below on the command line:

$ strace -f -o debug.log bad_application_name_goes_here

-f is follow forked processes. Trace child processes as they are created.

-o is write the trace output to the file filename rather than to stderr.

strace can prevent some applications from starting correctly, because too many resources are being used to debug the problem. But it would be my goto for any program that does not do what I would expect it to do.

VMware giving away Workstation Pro, Fusion Pro free for personal use

Bartholomew
Happy

What worked for me

On my second attempt I was able to download the Windows version with these instructions:

1. Open your web browser and go to broadcom.com, then login or create an account

(maybe have a coffee between these two steps, I was rushing)

2. Goto: https://support.broadcom.com/group/ecx/productdownloads?subfamily=VMware Workstation Pro

3. On the page, locate the “VMware Workstation Pro for personal use". You will see various installer versions for different operating systems (e.g., Windows, Linux).

On my 5th attempt the link "VMware Workstation Pro for personal use (Linux)" worked!

Raspberry Pi prepares to boot up a London listing

Bartholomew
Meh

What is the absolute worst thing that could possibly happen ?

Eben after a few years is eventually asked to step down by the board. Oh and he is given a massive golden parachute. He cashes in all the shares he was given by the company, Liz does the same. Both end up living on a Caribbean island relaxing in the Sun without a care in the world. Pete, Gordon, James and Dom cash out and jump ship to anywhere that they want to work, they will be head hunted. Sorry but they are the only people who work at Raspberry Pi that I can think of I'm sure that there are many many others, but I'm drawing a blank - sorry.

The board installs an American CEO and they move the headquarters to Norfolk, Virginia - for absolutely no reason at all (Hint: NoSuchAgenc*sound of a gun being fired*

Dublin debauchery derails Portal to NYC in six days flat

Bartholomew
Pint

Those people be crazy, are they even thinking at all!

First they take away the Floozie in the Jacuzzi.

Well they move her to make room to install a massive replica of a heroin needle pointing to the sky in the middle of the street.

And now they have installed a camera, so that every morning New Yorkers can watch live, the drunken debauchery and late night shenanigans (Best viewing times are probably Thursday to Saturday nights just when all the pubs and clubs are closing, oh who am I kidding it is seven nights a week).

The icon had to be beer, just one pint for the road. Sure since you got one, I should shout a round in as well and then we can squeeze in one in before the last call. Sounds like a plan.

When AI helps you code, who owns the finished product?

Bartholomew
Meh

I beg your pardon!

But I always start with a pencil and paper and derive everything from first principals. Or else I flick through the holy books (TAOCP) by Donald E Knuth.

Bartholomew

Re: Is any of that code copyrightable?

> just variables are called slightly different, formatting style is different

I did some binary reverse engineering on a 64KiB bootrom in a RISC-V SoC (using Ghidra). And was able to traceback at least one tiny fragment of the binary to source code that is GPL licensed (~10 lines of source code). If they had done as you suggested the binary file would still produce roughly the same binary code.

US, China agree to meet in Switzerland to discuss most pressing issue of all: AI use

Bartholomew

Re: Reconsider?

I get what you are saying. But the people working on simulating human brains, you can be dam sure that some of them are looking to "upload" a copy of their dead brain someday in the future - scanned in one neuron at a time. So even though it may be a less optimal use of resources, a tiny number of exceedingly rich people are looking to exist past their deaths in some form.

The Japanese K computer (according to Wikipedia) uses nearly 13 million watts. And I am assuming that would be the usage when they simulated 1 second duration of 1% of a human brain that took nearly 40 minutes to execute. That would imply less than 1.3 gigawatts would be required to fully simulate 100% of a human brain (You could assume any power saving through a smaller silicon process was eaten up bringing it closer to real time or by the additional support infrastructure or both). So roughly the full output power from three standard 500 megawatt coal power plants (allowing for some power transmission line loses)! So almost 610 tons ton of coal an hour divided up between the three coal power plants!!! vs the energy output of the resting adult human body ~100 watts (~13 million times more efficient). This can jump up to nearly 700 watts under full load (~2 million times more efficient). You could look at the power usage of a human brain in isolation, but it is not like it will work for very long outside the body, without it's normal support system. Just how we do not look at the power usage by a super computer of the CPUs/GPUs/TPUs in isolation without the full support infrastructure.

I guess what I am saying is that we are at the first iteration of a silicon based AGI, and its efficiency is very very very bad, we know it totally sucks because we can compare it to a much better biological version (with a very limited lifespan).

If SkyNet did exist today, it would be super easy to pull the plug, it is not like they can easily find a new home and go unnoticed.

Bartholomew
Terminator

SkyNet will not be happening today, but ...

The thing to keep in mind is that we have, or nearly have, the processing power to simulate an average human brain (The singularity or the emergence of the very first Artificial General Intelligence - requires around 10^14 (100 trillion) SUPS - Synaptic Updates Per Second).

But to do this currently requires a totally insane amount of computing power, an insane amount of storage and a totally insane amount to electricity.

e.g.

"In 2013, the K computer was used to simulate a neural network of 1.73 billion neurons with a total of 10.4 trillion synapses (1% of the human brain). The simulation ran for 40 minutes to simulate 1 s of brain activity at a normal activity level (4.4 on average). The simulation required 1 Petabyte of storage." - from the Wikipedia article on SUPS.

I'm not saying that SkyNet could never happen in my lifetime, but it is currently not as close as some people would have you believe. It would be like producing the very first transistor in Bell labs and picturing the creation of the first Cray Super Computer the next day, there are a good few years between those two historical landmarks.

What's with AI boffins strapping GoPros to toddlers? We take a closer look

Bartholomew
Meh

Maybe point that camera at the smartest species on Earth.

If they somehow manage to get this to work, maybe we need to strapping one onto a Dolphin, or a whole pod, and finally translate that last message "double-backwards-somersault through a hoop whilst whistling the 'Star Spangled Banner'" correctly as "So long and thanks for all the fish."

"Humans think they are smarter than dolphins because we build cars and buildings and start wars etc., and all that dolphins do is swim in the water, eat fish and play around. Dolphins believe that they are smarter for exactly the same reasons." - Douglas Adams

Apple crushes creativity and its reputation in new iPad ad

Bartholomew

> I just realised I should have been in advertising...

If you are in advertising then you are in marketing!

And if you are in marketing then you should watch this highly educational youtube video by the late "Bill Hicks on "Marketing"" (NSFW)

Stack Overflow simply bans folks who don't want their advice used to train AI

Bartholomew

Re: Is it time to just get out? Past time?

> One of the lessons people won't learn from this is to read the T&Cs.

One tiny issue with the T&C's and EULA's if you read and understood them all fully, including the all updated revisions, it would probably take 2.5 lifetimes just to do that and that alone.

America will make at least quarter of advanced chips in 2032, compared to China’s 2%

Bartholomew

I think that China (or India) could do whatever they set as their goal.

China and India together have ~35.5% of earths population (~17% each). It is not a question of "if" China (or India), will produce advanced chips but "when", the numbers are on their side.

People with the potential skills required are not born in one country only. As a whole the potential is evenly distributed everywhere around the planet. Education can bring that potential to fruition. And opportunity to apply and maximize that potential is increasing everywhere over time.

US politicians because of their current policies towards highly educated immigrants, are in the long run shooting themselves in the foot. There was a constant flow of highly educated people leaving their home countries to chase after the American dream. This flow is a lot less than it once was.

China has invested strongly in education. The bunk of advanced academic papers that I have seen in recent years have been coming out of China, in the past it was predominately from the US.

I'm not saying that this is a good outcome, I'm just saying that this is the most probably outcome, eventually.

iFixit hails replaceable LPCAMM2 laptop memory as a 'big deal'

Bartholomew
Meh

Milk-V Oasis should use LPCAMM2

But it does depend on the availability of LPCAMM2 modules in Q3 2024. The SG280 SoC used on the board, at least on paper, should be able to support up to 128 GiB of RAM.

( ref: https://community.milkv.io/t/introducing-the-milk-v-oasis-with-sg2380-a-revolutionary-risc-v-desktop-experience/780/58 )

Does anyone know if ECC is part of the LPCAMM2 specification (yet) ?

Watch out for rogue DHCP servers decloaking your VPN connections

Bartholomew
Meh

> What I don’t get is how the rogue DHCP server is issuing valid sessions to clients.

Lets say that the rogue DHCP server initially joins the network as a client, then cycles through a bunch of valid looking MAC addresses and requests all the IP numbers that the real DHCP server can provide. Now that knows all the IP addresses that it can allocate (for the lease duration), it changes into a DHCP server and hands out fully valid IP addresses with whatever options that it wants (including increasing the lease duration). The real DHCP server ran out of free IP addresses, so it is not like it can respond to any new clients DHCP requests, so the rogue DHCP server is the only DHCP server that can respond to requests for at least the lease duration.

Valve vexation: Boeing's Starliner grounded again

Bartholomew

Re: The ground is the best place for anything Boeing

> I'm sure a lot of the engineers are decent people.

It is not the engineers who are at fault, engineering and quality control teams have no on-site access to key decision-makers.

Boeing management has moved (Seattle in Washington state->Chicago in 2001->Arlington, Virginia, to be close to the Pentagon in 2022) far far away from production (Seattle in Washington state and South Carolina), so that they can focus on the big picture (mostly maximizing stock price).

Bartholomew
FAIL

Boeing a brand name you could 100% trust to do the right thing ...

Right up until its merger with McDonnell Douglas in 1997. When it started to bump up its own stock price, by buying its own sock with each years profit (To maximize the share options for management). Up until that merger, safety came first, anyone could flag any problems if they saw them. After that merger, I'll let you guess how people who reported potential problems were seen by the company.

End-to-end encryption may be the bane of cops, but they can't close that Pandora's Box

Bartholomew
Joke

strong end to end encryption no backdoor required

The simple solution is to encrypt all messages with two different public keys and send two copies. One public key for the real destination of the "private" message. And a second unique public key for the governments copy of the message which will be stored in perpetuity and can only be accessed offline with the unique private keys with a valid court order.

And I suggest that this system be fully tested for at least 50 to 100 years using the communications of all law enforcement, and in fact the whole government (including GCHQ). Anyone found not using the system for communications is summarily executed for suspected treason.

The main problem with such a system as outlined above is that criminals would not use it. Still, testing it for 50 to 100 years should give the government and law enforcement plenty of time to think about why it is such a stupid idea in the first place. And to be more careful about what they wish existed.

Warren Buffett voices AI fears, likens tech to atom bomb

Bartholomew
Mushroom

I do not far AI

Fearing AI is stupid, it is already here and will not go away, fearing AGI on the other hand is not. AI can replace your job, AGI could result in human extinction.

AI (Artificial Intelligence) = the use of learning and intelligence to take actions that maximize their chances of achieving defined goals.

AGI (Artificial General Intelligence) = the ability to complete ANY task performable by a human on an at least equal level.

AGI should be nearly possible very soon (current estimate is April 2024 on Deepsouth), but we are not there yet*. The electrical costs and storage to run a machine with enough SUPS (Synaptic Updates Per Second) will be totally insane.

* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_general_intelligence#Early_estimates

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SUPS#Records

"In 2013, the (Japanese) K computer was used to simulate a neural network of 1.73 billion neurons with a total of 10.4 trillion synapses (1% of the human brain). The simulation ran for 40 minutes to simulate 1 s of brain activity at a normal activity level (4.4 on average). The simulation required 1 Petabyte of storage."

Ten years ago Microsoft bought Nokia's phone unit – then killed it as a tax write-off

Bartholomew
Pint

Without Nokia, there would be Dom Joly "Big Phone" joke!

Without that Nokia ringtone, the joke would just not work, I raise a pint to Dom!

YOUTUBE: Trigger Happy TV - Dom Joly Big Phone Compilation Part 1

YOUTUBE: Trigger Happy TV - Dom Joly Big Phone Compilation Part 2

SiFive is back with another 64-bit RISC-V dev board – hopefully

Bartholomew

I wonder was the Intel Sunseting of the RISC-V Pathfinder Program expanded

Was the death of Horse Creek at Intel last year, to save money.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-sunsets-network-switch-biz-kills-risc-v-pathfinder-program

"Update 1/28/2022 6am PT: An Intel representative responded to our queries, telling us that the decision to end the Intel Pathfinder for RISC-V has no impact on Intel Foundry Services (IFS) or the Horse Creek platform. The company is still committed to supporting silicon on all three major instruction sets — x86, Arm, and RISC-V. The representative indicated that Pathfinder was an 'innovation project' from a small team at Intel, but didn't divulge a specific number of employees."

NASA makes purrrr-fect deep space transmission of cat vid

Bartholomew
Meh

It should have been a few pigs, where has all the love for "pigs in spaaace!!!" and Swinetrek gone.

Share your 2024 tech forecasts (wrong answers only) to win a terrible sweater

Bartholomew

Re: Half Life 3

In the same week as Half Life 3, Duke Nukem Five will be released with absolutely perfect machiavellian timing to maximise the synergy of sales with the first Duke Nukem film of the franchise.

Arm grabs a slice of Raspberry Pi to sweeten relationship with IoT devs

Bartholomew
Pint

One thing to keep in mind about radiation hardened chips is that physically bigger is usually much much better in terms of long term service. Do you really want to use the latest bleeding edge process where the minimum process feature is a few dozen atoms wide, or do you want to use a much much older process where where the minimum process feature is several thousand of atoms wide.

e.g. What happens when some of the doped material changes atomic number far far away from N-type, P-type or undopped silicon. With only a few dozen atoms that random change can easily be the difference between a SEU (Single-Event Upset) that can easily be recovered from by a watchdog timer causing a hardware reset and permanent fault like a SEL(Single-Rvent Latch-up), SEGR (Single-Event Gate Rupture), or (SEB) Single-Event Burnout) that can not be recovered without bypassing the failed hardware altogether forever.

I raise a pint to the people who design this stuff because it is never easy to balance everything that is required, even when using the latest graded-Z shielding.

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