* Posts by oiseau

852 posts • joined 1 Feb 2013

Page:

Amazon delivery staff 'denied bonus' pay by AI cameras misjudging their driving

oiseau Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Too soon

I'm struggling with this whole 'safety monitor' concept.

Hmm ...

I'm struggling to understand just why federal regulatory bodies allow this.

Wait ...

Yes, now I get it.

Maybe it's really not regulatory body stuff ...

Bozos now not only has to recover the cost of his divorce.

He also has to recover (and make a profit) from his New Shepard joyride, which must have also cost him a bundle.

How can he do that without gouging his employees just a bit more than usual?

ie: first employing them via contractors to avoid unionisation and then screwing them over for good measure.

Malignant asshole.

O.

More than three years after last release, X.Org Server 21.1.0 RC1 appears

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: @Steve

... as if the Microsoft way of developing, deploying and managing systems had managed to poison the Linux space ...

Hmm ...

... as if?

No.

It has poisoned the Linux ecosystem.

And what is worse, it has done it with a lot of help from within the Linux ecosystem.

Systemd, Pulse audio and Wayland are the exact opposite to the KISS model.

I keep them off my boxes.

From my point of view, after far too many years of work with M$ OSs, the one thing I can say is that systemd behaves just like M$'s infamous registry and that is no coincidence.

To quote another comentard here at ElReg:

---

" ... takes root in its host, eats massive quantities of resources as it grows, spreads unchecked into areas unrelated to the initial infection, and refuses to die unless physically removed from the system, all the while doing absolutely nothing of benefit to the host."

---

ie: just like a malignant tumour.

I too try to ignore as much of the things that wind me up.

But then, I also read ElReg. 8^D

Have a good weekend.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Not Really Off Topic!!!

Please get the point ...

... IT'S BETTER THAN MANY OF THE ALTERNATIVES!!

I get it, always have.

Which is why, much to my chagrin, I am still using Xfce4 on my main box.

But, quite convinced that Xfce is steadily going to the dogs, my next stop will probably be a customized Openbox type setup, like Philip Newborough's #! Linux.

BTW: there's really no need to shout, OP.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Thumb Up

Should I retire?

No.

By no means.

Someone with the necessary experience has to say it like it is.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Not Really Off Topic!!!

... still haven't fixed its issues with extending the desktop ...

Indeed ...

Not to mention Xfce4's infamous icon placement, power management and compositing issues that have been going on for many years now, with no fix in sight.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Not Really Off Topic!!!

... what more could an Old Guy want?

Hmm ...

Rather off topic, but only to answer your question:

That Xfce4 gets fixed and rid of all the bugs it has, once and for all.

Because there's absolutely no way I will be moving to the abomination the next versions of Xfce will become.

https://forum.xfce.org/viewtopic.php?pid=56144

https://forum.mxlinux.org/viewtopic.php?t=56087

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Thumb Up

Go X!

Kanapickas considered this separation "good practice" and therefore the new release candidate is X.Org-only.

+1 for Kanapickas.

For both this and taking up the slack.

I'm staying with X.Org.

O.

Microsoft does and doesn't require VMs to meet hardware requirements for Windows 11

oiseau Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: All major OSes suck

My pair of 9 year old Ivy Bridge i7-3770s are still very capable machines ...

There you go !!!! 8^D

My ca. 2007 Sun Ultra24 on a Q9550 + 8Gb RAM runs Linux Devuan Beowulf and a couple of VMs without issues.

O.

Yes, of course there's now malware for Windows Subsystem for Linux

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Doesn't seem very viable

No, with all of the Python stuff (libraries pulling in more libraries, command line options ...

Hmm ...

That is why admin priviliges exist.

And they are called priviliges for a reason.

If a user with admin priviliges and an academic degree screws up by uploading/installing from outside the repositories, it is on their plate to suffer the consequences.

I've been there more than once, became more aware of my lack of knowledge but also learned quite a bit in the process.

But no, WSL (not depending on anything here) is not good for the Linux ecosystem.

That much I know.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Doesn't seem very viable

How is that any worse than someone running an untrusted Windows binary?

Let me explain:

An untrusted Windows binary in Windows?

I don't give a rat's toss about that.

The Linux ecosystem has, by design, a thoroughly checked and validated software repositories system.

So it is highly unlikely or impossible that people using a dist like Ubuntu, Debian or Fedora Core (or any other for that matter) would be installing or running random binaries.

A bad .deb/.rpm, etc. would have to be both written and purposedly uploaded to a repository.

And to have any success, a great many safeguards would have to fail at the same time, safeguards that we know from experience MS does not have.

WSL is the unchecked entry point for untrusted Windows binaries into Linux.

And that is an unforgivable mistake.

Understand?

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: How this works

MS are many things but the MS of 25-30 years ago they’re not.

Really?

Don't be daft ...

O.

oiseau Silver badge
FAIL

Anyone surprised?

Four years later, WSL-based malware has arrived.

Ahh ...

Is ANYONE bloody $#%&= surprised?

Like I posted just five months ago:

---

Pirate Dave wrote: ... trusting Microsoft in anything Linux-related just seems like a Bad Idea.

It does not seem like a Bad Idea: it is a Bad Idea.

But it's not old-skool thinking or old anything for that matter.

After all the crap the IT world has seen from MS in the past 30+ years?

It is nothing but good old common sense.

The kind that comes from having learnt from experience plus the wisdom accrued from years of IT work.

And I'll quote myself:

"Anything 'Windows for Linux' is nothing but a cancer out to get at the Linux ecosystem from inside out.

But the writing has been on the wall for ages, only that the (intellectually) blind refuse to see it and find it all so convenient.

One day it will be too late."

---

And as you can gather, too late is slowly creeping upon us.

There's no way any of this MS rubbish is going near my Linux boxes.

O.

Bepanted shovel-toting farmer wins privacy payout from France TV

oiseau Silver badge

Re: Don't get it

Broadcasting such a video to the public is a breach of privacy.

Hmm ...

What was filmed and later broadcast by France Télévisions was not news?

So ...

In your rather narrow view of what happened (to which you are entitled), journalists at the scene of such an incident would need to get everyone at the site to sign the proper release forms before turning on their cameras?

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Don't get it

But footage of the scuffle shot by the journalists present went viral on the internet ...

Hmmm ...

Weren't the journalists filming a fracas between the bird enthusiasts and the farmers which resulted in a farmer being fined for violence with a weapon?

The footage of the incident, later broadcast by France Télévisions and others (?) undoubtedly ended up being the proof which got him nailed with a fine for assault.

So ...

How is it that said footage became breach of privacy?

Makes me wonder why France Télévisions has not appealed the ruling.

They were covering the news, were they not?

And if the famer decided to come out improperly dressed pour l'occasion ...

Whose fault is it?

O.

Not too bright, are you? Your laptop, I mean... Not you

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Windows 10 blank screen

... that meant "100% brightness" was interpreted as "100% darkness" when on battery ...

Surprised?

Well ...

It was Windows, no?

O.

Vaccine dreams: A trip to Oxford to see a biscuit tin, some bed pans and ChAdOx1 nCov-19

oiseau Silver badge
Pint

... giving it some responsibility for Britain's outstanding reputation for strategic brilliance, moral leadership and journalistic sarcasm.

Brilliant!

O.

Compromise reached as Linux kernel community protests about treating compiler warnings as errors

oiseau Silver badge
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No warnings = healthy code

... any maintainer who has code that causes warnings should expect that they will have to fix those warnings…

Once again, albeit after years of pain, Torvalds tells it as it is.

In my opinion as an end user, a very necessary statement.

We have already read about Torvalds complaining about incorrectly commented code and I see this as a follow up to that.

But as I have mentioned before, it is not only incorrectly commented code: how much unfixed code has been piling up for years ie: won't fix code because it produced a harmless warning, did not affect enough people or because the kernel version was soon to be EOL'd?

Of course, some may get snipped out by the next kernel version/s but most will probably not.

And that's just dirt/grime being piled up and festering in some dark corner, much of it originated in the type of code that the strict implementation of -Werror will eventually eliminate.

In time, kernel code without warnings will be a matter of course. ie: clean, healthy code with no useless crud left behind.

Today, these warnings (the pain LT refers to) compose part of that dirt/grime which may eventually raise it's ugly head and end up breaking something further down the line and probably take a lot of time and manpower to fix.

So whatever the cost the implementation of -Werror, it is better to assume it as early as possible.

I see it as an unavoidable, essential part of healthy professional coding.

----

The only way forward is lean and clean code.

---

It is a concept that would seem to have been lost and Linux Torvalds is only reminding us all that he has not lost sight of it.

Kudos to him.

O.

GitHub merges 'useless garbage' says Linus Torvalds as new NTFS support added to Linux kernel 5.15

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

... feels like the kind of thing that'll have an 'accidental' *uid = 0 buried somewhere in it.

Finally. 8^/

I've been thinking that is what will eventually happen (sooner than later) ever since it was announced.

I really see no need for it, none whatsoever.

Not in or within the Linux ecosystem.

I've been using Linux for over well 10 years now and I can't recall the last time I had to look into a NTFS format drive.

Go over it with a fine tooth comb, linus ...

Indeed ...

Better yet: how about rolling back all this BS and leaving things as they were?

It's disaster just waiting to happen.

O.

NHS England's release of 'details' on access to Palantir COVID-19 data store: Good enough? We're in a 'dialogue' says national data watchdog

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Sad state of affairs

... detail on data flows from a patient medical information project that put US spy-tech firm Palantir at the heart of the government's response ...

Hmm ...

UK patient's medical information handled by a US spy-tech firm in cahoots with the government*?

What's there to worry about?

O.

*UK's PM and his band of chummies

Microsoft does and doesn't want you to know it won't stop you manually installing Windows 11 on older PCs

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Explain to me why I should upgrade

... might be an old curmudgeon who's happy with ...

There you go !!!! 8^D

I am an old(ish) curmudgeon who is quite happy with both my Sun Ultra24 on a Q9550/8Gb RAM and my Asus 1000HE on an Atom N280/2Gb which I use when I have to leave home.

Both run Linux Devuan Beowulf and I'm quite happy with them.

O.

When everyone else is on vacation, it's time to whip out the tiny screwdrivers

oiseau Silver badge
Pint

Thank you

So the kitchen table it is – my go-to workbench for spending quality time with my lockdown besties ...

Thank you Mr. Dabbs.

I now feel fuly vindicated/justified.

What little space my kitchen counter has has also been my workbench for years now.

Now that I think of it, seems it's been as many as have passed since my last split-up.

Have a good week-end.

And one on me. --->

O.

Razer ponders how to fix installer that grants admin powers if you plug in a mouse

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: WTF?

You can write bad rpms or debs if you're not understanding what you're doing ...

Yes, you certainly can.

But it is highly unlikely (not to say impossible).

People who don't know what they are doing just do not get to write a bad Linux package (rpm, deb, etc.) which will actually get into a distribution's repository and then be downloaded and installed.

In 10+ years running Linux distributions I have never seen such a thing happen.

It would have to be done on purpose and then a great many safeguards would have to fail at the same time.

Safeguards that MS evidently does not have in place.

Like I said: highly unlikely or impossible.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: WTF?

Device driver installation, which by its nature is modifying part of the OS that is shared between users, should not be runnable by a user at all if they do not have the required permissions to do so.

Indeed ...

You know that.

I know that.

MS developers know that, they just don't give a monkey's toss.

But 99.9% of Windows users don't know that.

Because if they did, they would most probably use a systemd-free Linux distribution.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

WTF?

... if you plug into a Windows 10 or 11 machine a device identified as a Razer mouse or keyboard, Microsoft's OS will automatically download and run Razer's installer.

Right ...

What could possibly go wrong with such an interesting scheme?

Never mind ...

We wonder how many Windows installers have these same weaknesses.

Er ...

More than one?

O.

UK's National Data Guardian warned about GP data grab being perceived as going 'under the radar'

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

For an official to ignore this should be a sackable offence.

Of course.

But to what effect?

You do know how revolving doors work, don't you?

Sacking is not nearly enough.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
WTF?

Listen?

National Data Guardian (NDG) warned the government could be "perceived as trying to introduce changes 'under the radar'".

Of course those in charge of the NHS did not listen.

Whatever for?

Dame Caldicott was only puting sticks in what could be perceived to be will end up being a very profitable wheel run by the usual chummy suspects and their overseas partners.

To the expense of the usual victims: the NHS and the taxpayers.

And we cannot have any of that, can we old boy?

O.

Debian 11 formally debuts and hits the Bullseye

oiseau Silver badge
Stop

Re: Support for init

... day is now in sight when Devuan will have made its point and be merged back into Debian.

No.

I . don't . think . so.

You see, trust is like a unique and thus irreplaceable crystal decanter: it must be handled very carefully.

But if you are careless and break it, even if in just two or three pieces, it will be irreparably lost.

Never to be the same thing again.

Yes, you may eventually be able to put the pieces back together.

But it will never be the same crystal decanter as it has been broken.

Such is what happened with Debian and the systemd debacle.

So ...

Devuan merged back to Debian?

As far as I am concerned, not unless hell freezes over.

Twice.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

... how does it affect you as a user?

How?

I'll just quote comments from other comentards here at ElReg:

"Systemd also has its dirty fingers into other parts of the system. As a replacement for sysvinit is is supposed to be an init system, but because its scope goes far beyond the initialization phase (and it doesn't let you take the good without the bad) it has become a dependency for many userspace programs that should never have any reason to interact with the init system at all, making it harder to use those programs on a non-systemd system."

---

" ... takes root in its host, eats massive quantities of resources as it grows, spreads unchecked into areas unrelated to the initial infection, and refuses to die unless physically removed from the system, all the while doing absolutely nothing of benefit to the host."

---

That's how.

In a nutshell: systemd is nothing but a developer endorsed registry-class virus set up inside Linux distributions, just like the registry in MS OSs from W95 onwards.

O.

Apple's iPhone computer vision has the potential to preserve privacy but also break it completely

oiseau Silver badge
WTF?

It's Apple treating its customers with contempt.

So what's new?

It has been going on for decades.

And (besides Apple's) just who's fault is it?

Surely not the legions of dickheads with more money than common sense who actually think this is all so cool and convenient.

Eh?

Too much for a monday ...

O.

£3m for 8 weeks of consultancy work: McKinsey given contract to advise UK.gov on tech project business cases

oiseau Silver badge
WTF?

You don't say !

The Cabinet Office would not confirm whether any SMEs bid for the contract ...

No need to confirm anything much.

It's just business as usual.

And on it goes ..

O.

Firefox 91 introduces cookie clearing, clutter-free printing, Microsoft single sign-on... so where are all the users?

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

... the lovely Firefox developers, who are undoubtedly dedicated to their cause, could focus a little less on UI/UX trendiness and instead concentrate on privacy/security, they might be able to make this world a one heck of a better place.

Indeed ...

I left FF many iterations ago, probably was when I could no longer get rid of their newfound round corneriness ...

I finally got fed up with all the trendiness crappiness they subjected their quite useful UI to.

I have tried the last one, just to see: no, not going back.

Now I'm using Pale Moon.

O.

US proposes tracking digital cash and taxing it to pay for, you know, roads and stuff

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Any exchange worthy of handling your assets is already gathering and verifying all of this data ...

Of course.

The US probably does not want Delaware, Montana, South Dakota, Wyoming, New York, etc. to have any sort of competition in the already crowded* Hide Your Money from the Taxman game.

O.

* Bermuda, Cayman Islands, Netherlands, Switzerland, Singapore, Ireland, Luxemburg, Curaçao, Hong Kong, Cyprus, Bahamas, Jersey, Barbados, Mauritius, British Virgin Islands and a few other lesser actors.

Ch-ch-ch-Chia! HDD sales soar to record levels as latest crypto craze sweeps Europe

oiseau Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Quick buck

Don't bring the tin around when your house is on the market ...

The bang we will be subjected to when all this crypto-crap comes down will be heard at the other end of the universe.

All that will remain will be the dire consequences, which will be felt for decades.

O.

Following Torvalds' nudge, Paragon's NTFS driver for Linux is on track for kernel

oiseau Silver badge
WTF?

... what this driver brings to the table that we don't already have.

Beat me to it.

Quite so ...

Just why does the Linux kernel need to add ~27K lines of code to the kernel?

Is this really necessary?

To get exactly what in return?

From where I stand, I see absolutely nothing.

It's much too little, far too late and with excess caveats attached.

As far as I know, Linux currently has two NTFS drivers, a FUSE (Filesystem in Userspace) driver which is read/write, and a kernel driver which is read-only.

I've managed quite well with that when I have needed to look at/write to the odd HDD with a NTFS filesystem and in 10+ years using Linux, I really cannot remember the last time I accessed a NTFS partition.

Adding 27K lines of code is nothing short of a sure recipe for serious trouble further on.

---------------------------------------------------------------> Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes <---------------------------------------------------------------

O.

Tech spec experts seek allies to tear down ISO standards paywall

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: The Management.

... immediate effects on quite a lot of people that they feed and clothe.

Makes me wonder just how much feeding and clothing we're talking about here.

It would not be the first time we see an internationally financed body with far too many posts that have, through years of laissez-faire from those who they are supposed to work for, managed to secure succulent perks for themselves.

As a direct consequence, these naturally morphed from feeding and clothing into wining and dining, which have to be paid for.

And who checks on that aspect of the Central Secretariat* ?

O.

* Never mind, the name says it all ...

oiseau Silver badge
Thumb Up

Short, succint and to the point

It is very difficult to teach about ISO standards when the students can't access them.

Ian Graham / Senior Lecturer / University of Edinburgh

A case of ale for this chap ---- > 8^D

---

The ISO did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Of course they didn't.

What could the ISO Central Secretariat possibly say on their behalf?

They should all be fired and replaced with people who know what to do and how to do it.

O.

Hard drives at Autonomy offices were destroyed the same month CEO Lynch quit, extradition trial was told

oiseau Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Should It Not Be Buyer Beware?

Just a thought ...

Just a thought?

No.

Basic common sense which, from the looks of how things are going, is not at all that basic or common.

At this point in time the one thing I am convinced of is that Lynch is the chosen fall guy in this charade while absolutely everyone else involved (HP's board, the auditors, etc.) gets to go home without any pending issues.

eg:

I. It has been reported that a total of 15 firms advised HP on the Autonomy deal, among them heavyweights UBS, Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America, with Slaughter & May and Morgan Lewis serving as the company's legal advisers.

15 top level firms and no one saw any red lights?

Are all these firms staffed by dumb DHs?

II. The auditors involved assured HP that it could go ahead and pay 8.8 billion for Autonomy but shortly after the purchase, HP decided to write down over 75% of the price paid.

Then they were able to expressly deny any "wrongdoing or liability" in exchange for settling with HP for 45M, probably the amount of their evidently unearned and obviously unjustified consulting fees.

No liability?

A joke, albeit very expensive for HP.

And they are still laughing.

As an example from long ago: IBM paid Lotus $3.25bn for the Notes email client which, as everyone knows, went nowhere but to oblivion, very fast.

Now ...

Did IBM's Gerstner write off $2.6bn from that acquisition and then sue Lotus' Manzi for it?

III. HP flushed 8.8 billion down the toilet but somehow (magically?) managed to settle the matter with HP's shareholders for a measly 100M, which in the end came out of the shareholder's own pockets.

Basically, 100M more to be added add to the 8.8 billion write down.

Incredible but true.

IV. 8.8 billion dollars is certainly not a number any corporation can ignore, more so if it is a write off on the puchase of a company they paid 11.7 billion for.

You could write off (maybe) up to 10% on a deal because of ... whatever.

It happens all the time, there are many factors that come into play post facto that can justify a write off for such a percentage.

But what we are talking about here is over 75% of the price HP paid for Autonomy.

I don't know about M. Lynch, but I'm convinced that all the HPE executives involved in this monumentally absurd fuck-up are either crooks or dumber than a (used) Brillo pad.

My money is 10-1 on their being crooks.

And who knows what else has been brushed under the carpet.

But a question remains:

Just why did HP push and shove so much in order to get this deal through?

And then, just where has all the moolah gone?

I think there's much more to this than what has been revealed.

Just a thought.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Stop

Re: Lynched?

... don't go crying about your human rights after the fact, you gave them up when you decided to break the law.

No, you did not.

You broke the law.

Period.

In doing so you did not forfeit your human rights ie: the basic rights and freedoms that belong to every person in the world, from birth until death.

Dignity, fairness, equality, respect and independence.

All of them are defined and protected by law.

Please take into account that writing such idiocy makes you look like an asshole.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Lynched?

... a stupid buy by HP ...

... HP had more than enough people and advisors ...

... disgusting that they can extradite from UK to US because some idiots over payed ...

Indeed.

Al this is a scam to cover up what sums up misadministration on behalf of HPs board.

Over 8.0 billion in misadministration.

He wrote: "I am satisfied that the huge financial losses caused to HP in the USA, the losses suffered by American investors and the significant reputational damage caused to HP strongly favours extradition."

Seeing that Lynch was not prosecuted in the UK by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) for this HP mess, makes me wonder how much it took to convince judge Snow.

I'm' talking about evidence, of course.

O.

I've got a broken combine harvester – but the manufacturer won't give me the software key

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: This kind of mis-selling is rampant

Hmm ...

...expect Republicans, those champions of individual freedom PACs, corporation contributions and (of course) fat brown envelopes to be leading the effort.

There you go.

Adjusted to reality.

The McCain-Feingold Act (2002) was a protective shield for democracy in the US but it was gutted in 2010 when corporations acquired first amendment protection of free speech.

And the net result is there for all to see.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: I remember when…

Many years ago, when I purchased my first home box (486SX) I was not a fan of games so I was a tardy arrival to the soundcard market a couple of upgrades later.

I'm still using the same JP made Sony SRS-PC30 active speaker system I reluctantly purchased (whatever for?, thought I) along with a SB16 ISA card back in 1995. Works great and even have a service manual, complete with a schematic and compete parts list w/specs, in case it ever acts up.

Works great, as the first day I hooked it up.

Granted, Sony was a very different (and reliable) beast back then.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: two separate comments

... might be back on shore with a goosed engine.

Hmm ...

Possibly.

But alive and with your boat in one piece.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Only half the story of half the story

On recommendation of a colleague, I once purchased an 80lt. water heater made by a firm called Baxi.

Three years on, I decided it was time to purge it like I do once a year but this time, open up, inspect and replace the magnesium anode, something that is part of the usual maintainace schedule and (as an architect) I know how to do blindfolded.

The heater and element were in good state, with very little deposits and sediment but as the anode had done its job, it was up for replacement as expected.

Easy, or so I thought ...

Long story short: it is absolutely impossible to buy a replacement for any Baxi appliance where I live.

The local rep does not sell them to anyone, not even to their official dealers and if you call to ask about a part, they will not return your calls.

For most owners of a Baxi water heater, the fix is an absurdly expensive visit from a Baxi tech just to have a look and then another with an equally absurdly expensive bill for a replacement anode.

My fix was to purchase a same size anode for a different brand water heater and adapt it but this is not up to the average appartment owner.

Lesson learnt: no way I am ever getting a Baxi appliance again.

O.

NSO Group 'will no longer be responding to inquiries' about misuse of its software

oiseau Silver badge
WTF?

Re: This is a strawman.

According to Amnesty, NSO operated the servers.

And (of course, just what were you thinking?) AWS did not know or have any inkling as to what was going on.

Right?

O.

In a complete non-surprise, Mozilla hammers final nail in FTP's coffin by removing it from Firefox

oiseau Silver badge
Pint

... wonder what bozos started to make the Firefox design decisions at Mozilla.

Finally ...

Thank you for that. 8^D

I've been bitching about exactly the same thing for three or four years now.

They (them Bozos at Mozilla ...) have turned what once was a relatively decent browser with a lot of potential into a POS mess with an absurd UI.

I know, it's not friday yet, but still...

Have one three on me. ----->

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Thumb Up

... did you actually use FTP in a web browser?

Never.

Many (many) years ago, when I was on the Windows side of office/desktop users, I used WS_FTP by Ipswitch.

They had a freeware version for the likes of me, good software that worked beautifully well.

O.

AWS gave Parler a chance, won't say if it talked to NSO before axing spyware biz's backend systems

oiseau Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: A thought when I was reading thru the details from Amnesty

... avoid phones which have apps.

... avoiding popular phone platforms.

Quite so.

Been doing that for ages.

But been branded from backwards to idiot, etc. by many.

Because, you know, all those social media apps and assorted things are so convenient.

And yes, they're also free.

O.

oiseau Silver badge
Big Brother

Re: Is that good enough for mission-critical operations?

... why a company peddling stuff like this actually chose to use AWS ...

Indeed, the first thing that crossed my mind.

Makes me wonder ...

Could it possibly be that AWS has been caught red handed?

ie: in cahoots with NSO

O.

Iffy voltage: The plague of PC builders and Hubble space telescope controllers alike

oiseau Silver badge
Thumb Up

SUCCESS !!!!!

https://www.kktv.com/2021/07/16/hubble-space-telescope-fixed-after-month-no-science/

56 minutes ago - 14:06:00 -03:00 GMT

Engineers successfully switched to the backup equipment Thursday, and the crucial payload computer kicked in. NASA said Friday that science observations should resume quickly, if everything goes well.

Kudos for these guys at NASA.

8^D !!!

O.

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