* Posts by HildyJ

1907 posts • joined 2 Nov 2012

IBM pulls up the ladder behind some supercomputer customers

HildyJ Silver badge
Trollface

IBM vs. Google

IBM at least gives you a warning when they pull a ladder from their hardware offering.

Google gives you no warning when they pull the ladder out from under you with their software offerings.

Excuse me, what just happened? Resilience is tough when your failure is due to a 'sequence of events that was almost impossible to foresee'

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

Re: The

Systems need to be designed and configured to allow for manually triggering failover and failback.

Triggering it, running the failover system for a week (to include day/night and weekday/weekend) should be part of your monthly cycle. The same should hold true for any redundant ancillary equipment (e,g, ACs, UPSs).

Some things will never be anticipated but you can be better prepared for when they happen.

Seven-year-old make-me-root bug in Linux service polkit patched

HildyJ Silver badge
Angel

Kernelish?

Apple, it's OK. Seriously. You don't need to blind your iOS 15 engineers to prevent leaks

HildyJ Silver badge

Re: Staatssicherheitsdienst

Wait for the Worldwide Loyalty Team to decide that not only do employees have to work on campus, they have to live on campus.

Let's hope they don't get their hands on any Novichok from Putin's WLT FSB.

Prez Biden narrowly escapes cicada assassination attempt, hunkers down in Cornwall

HildyJ Silver badge
Angel

Zombie Cicada Fungus

Boffins have discovered a fungus whose spores turn them into, according to the normally staid Scientific American, "horror movie sex-bots".

I want some and I want it now.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-this-zombie-fungus-turns-cicadas-into-horror-movie-sex-bots/

An anti-drone system that sneezes targets to death? Would that be a DARPA project? You betcha

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

S'not bad

For a demonstration system it seems worthy of further development (although their anti-drone laser is cooler.

But I wonder if snot could be applied to anti space junk proposals?

NTT slashes top execs’ pay as punishment for paying more than their share of $500-a-head meals with government officials

HildyJ Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Good but extreme - No

It is certainly good but it is not extreme, it is appropriate

Jail would be very extreme. Firing would be extreme. Either would blot the employee's reputation.

This is ideal. It's an internal company matter which punishes the employee but can be rescinded once the employee has proven himself.

BTW, $500 is cheap. The best sushi restaurant in New York charges $650 per person, even at lunch, not including drinks.

Would-be AWS bomber pleads guilty, faces 5 to 20 years behind bars for plot to take out government servers

HildyJ Silver badge
Trollface

Re: The Internet is in that box over there

Obligatory reference: https://xkcd.com/908/

Fastly 'fesses up to breaking the internet with an 'an undiscovered software bug' triggered by a customer

HildyJ Silver badge
Pint

Re: 95% restoration in 49mins (plus uptime)

I agree and applaud Fastly for the speedy correction.

But lost in the other posts is the fact I can find nothing {searching ElReg) about Fastly being down since a 2016 DDoS attack that downed managed DNS provider Dyn which affected Fastly.

So we're talking 0.0001% downtime (1/(24*365) which is to say 99.9999% uptime. This reliability is why customers pay for the service.

Security researcher says attacks on Russian government have Chinese fingerprints – and typos, too

HildyJ Silver badge
Devil

Re: "too crude to have been the work of a Western nation"

They're assuming western malware developers can spell. Sub-millennials can't even spell Tick-Tock.

US Senate finds $52bn to keep chipmakers working, $195bn for tech R&D

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

We'll see

This is just the Senate bill - very pro big business and anti China. The House can pass it, pass a similar bill, or decide it's already part of the infrastructure bill that they already passed. Regardless, the final bill will have more constraints.

Still, most of the $52b subsides will go to big business because they're just not many small businesses doing chip design and fabrication.

It's completely unsupportable. Yes, we mean your brand new system

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Small steps

" take time to make/build and describe/document."

Aye, there's the rub. Time is money, and management wants things yesterday. To get it done as close to management demands as possible, IT drops the describe/document for a 'later' release.

There is also management's desire for more than a small step. And, as you mention, their 'input' as to what that bigger step should be.

There are people, in and out of IT, who know how to do things right. It's just that nobody's listening to them.

Door-opening insect mega-swarm emerges in Eastern US, descends on Washington DC

HildyJ Silver badge
Mushroom

In cicada country, no one can hear you scream

Because they drown the screams out with their constant, 24/7, screeching.

I live a few miles outside of Washington, DC on a lot with many trees and many, many, many, . . . many cicadas.

For your (but not my) enjoyment, here is CNN's Capitol Hill correspondent discovering that a cicada has crawled up his left lapel and onto his neck:

https://twitter.com/mkraju/status/1398031493717504001

This has happened to me but I don't have video so I guess it never happened.

Global Fastly outage takes down many on the wibbly web – but El Reg remains standing

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

One of the drivers for CDNs is the end user experience. If they are working, websites load more quickly and you've only got seconds before the user goes somewhere else.

The Beeb is big enough and considers itself important enough to spend extra for multiple CDNs and a CDN switcher. Most websites don't. They are content with their users seeing quick page loads for all but a few hours of the year.

It will be interesting to see if Fastly's transparency extends to letting us know what actually happened but whether or not they do I don't think it will affect their business much.

Photographer seeks $12m in copyright damages over claims Capcom ripped off her snaps in Resident Evil 4 art

HildyJ Silver badge
WTF?

Re: From reading elsewhere...

Searching inside on Google Books, neither the word "license" or "reuse" occur and the word "commercial" only occurs in reference to commercial terms for things like type of stone or wood.

I assume she will get something but I doubt it will be anything near to what she is asking.

I think therefore IAM: It's not cool, it's not sexy, but it's one of the most important and difficult areas in modern IT

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

Re: HR is the key

Inertia.

With IDs, it's not just HR, although they are a big part of the problem. It's also every group that writes contracts or hires consultants who will require IDs. And then you add on user permissions and all groups or people who can grant or revoke them.

Each of them was doing this before you showed up and none of them wants to change their process.

Chinese app binned by Beijing after asking what day it is on anniversary of Tiananmen Square massacre

HildyJ Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Isn't it ironic ?

Nobody's going to research why. The few who are told will accept what they are told and leave it at that.

People, East and West, are generally quite happy with not knowing.

Uncle Sam recovers 63.7 of 75 Bitcoins Colonial Pipeline paid to ransomware crew

HildyJ Silver badge
Devil

Re: FBI has been busy

Obviously, the Lizard People can break blockchain. How do you think they're financing their master plan .

Military infosec SNAFUs: What WhatsApp and bears in the woods can teach us

HildyJ Silver badge
IT Angle

Trust

It all boils down to trust and I don't trust users.

At every level you find users who will want to save the decrypted output "just in case." And the higher up the command (or management) chain you go, the more likely it is.

The reason you can't spell shit without IT is that IT is where the shit flows to.

Linux 5.13 hits rc5, isn’t yet calm, Linus Torvalds is only mildly perturbed

HildyJ Silver badge
Linux

Diatros

As has been pointed out, Linux is a kernel and not a full OS. This presents a problem for people like RyokuMas, the OP, since there are about 100 active distros.

For dabblers in Linux, the question of "what should I install to run Linux on me old PC if I want to run basic tasks like surfing the internet, emailing, texting, playing music, and watching videos?" is not an easy one to find the answer to.

If Wikipedia is any indication, the Linux community doesn't really care about the dabblers since its Comparison of Linux distributions hasn't been updated in two years.

Let me say that various communities can be very helpful with newbie questions after something goes wrong but they are less helpful with "how do I start?"

If we want to wash the unwashed we need to do a better job of handholding.

G7 nations aim for global 15 per cent tax on big tech and bin digital services taxes

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

"Tax havens that facilitated profit-shifting, and big tech’s lawyers and accountants, are already hard at work on new schemes that get around the G7 proposal."

Ya think?

According to Wikipedia, "The strongest consensus amongst academics regarding the world's largest tax havens is therefore: Ireland, Singapore, Switzerland and the Netherlands (the major Conduit OFCs), and the Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands, Luxembourg, Hong Kong and Bermuda (the major Sink OFCs), with the United Kingdom (a major Conduit OFC) still in transformation.

The UK can certainly decide to stop being a conduit (where revenues and profits are shifted) and could, perhaps, do something about the sinks (where profits are declared) of the Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands, and Bermuda. The EU could, perhaps, strong arm Ireland, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg. But that still leaves the rest of the world to bargain with tax lawyers. If El Salvador goes through with its plans to adopt Bitcoin as a legal currency, could their next step be to open a new tax haven?

Flying dildo poses a slap in the face for serious political debate

HildyJ Silver badge
Coat

It's getting harder and harder for politicians.

Maybe that's why it sounds like they just spew out whatever comes .

Report commissioned by Google says Google isn't to blame for the death of print news

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

Report commissioned by Journalism.org

Daily and Sunday newspaper subscriptions peaked in 1990, 8 years before Google was formed. While this was the year that Berners-Lee created the WorldWideWeb browser it's impact was still far in the future

What 1990 does coincide with is the Gulf War and CNN's rise to prominence. Major networks beefed up their news operations and, as the war concluded, started running more human interest segments along with the hard news. Eventually other types of news shows and channels developed. Newspapers found their readership transferring to TV watchership and advertisers followed.

SAP's RISE 'yet to prove its worth in practice...' Key German user group offers giant a progress 'reality check'

HildyJ Silver badge
Devil

"DSAG has issued a strongly worded statement"

SAP response: "We thank you for your input."

[background noise] Shredder running.

Microsoft subsidiary makes $314.73bn profit and pays no tax in Ireland – despite registering there

HildyJ Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Microsoft is good at abusing boundaries...

It's not just Microsoft, it's every single multinational corporation. They all have teams of tax lawyers whose job is to move their money around to legally avoid taxes. Non multinationals do it to but generally less blatantly.

Supreme Court narrows Computer Fraud and Abuse Act: Misusing access not quite the same as breaking in

HildyJ Silver badge
Thumb Up

Courtpocalypse?

It's a start but it's still up to Congress to fix the law.

Still, like the API ruling, it speaks to a Court that isn't flummoxed by technology and is willing to investigate the consequences of its decisions.

What I found interesting is that the Trump judges voted en masse with the Clinton and Obama judges. I'm still fearful of Trump's appointees, but a little less today than I was yesterday .

NASA doubles down on Venus missions, asking what made the planet uninhabitable

HildyJ Silver badge
Pint

Background music for the boffins

While they have their obligatory pints. Bon voyage.

Space Truckin

US slaps tariffs on countries that hit Big Tech with digital services taxes ... then pauses them immediately

HildyJ Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: About bl**dy time

I never said that small businesses need to pay the same rates as large ones.

The Guardian today reported that Microsoft's Irish subsidiary paid zero taxes on £220bn profit. I doubt that means that smaller Irish companies don't have to pay taxes either.

It's not just Microsoft, it's all multinationals and most big corporations. And it's not just Ireland, that's just who popped up on my newsfeed.

Tax lawyers are paid to game the system in every country that their corporation operates in and every country has its own tax code with its own definition of profit.

HildyJ Silver badge
WTF?

Re: About bl**dy time

The problem is "profit". Profit is a will-of-the-wisp concept. As Humpty Dumpty said "When I use a word, it means just what I choose it to mean."

We need to move to a tax on revenue, not just for digital services but for everything.

This AI could save a firefighter's life

HildyJ Silver badge
Holmes

Bad training yields bad results

To paraphrase Mike Tyson “Everyone has a simulation ’till they get punched in the mouth.”

Training an AI on simulated data enables it to predict the simulated world, not the real one. What is sad about this extremely worthwhile effort is that real data for training the AI was available. Fire departments train firefighters in specially constructed buildings with real fires involving real furnishings, appliances, etc. This real world data should have been used as input rather than just as verification.

Huawei names first tablets, phones to run its Android-in-disguise HarmonyOS 2

HildyJ Silver badge
Unhappy

"totally-not-but-really-is"

Is this how ElReg is going to describe forked software going forward. If so, it makes sense. If it's only Huawei then it makes ElReg sound like it's parroting the US government and it makes the rest of the interesting article less credible.

Antivirus that mines Ethereum sounds a bit wrong, right? Norton has started selling it

HildyJ Silver badge
Facepalm

FOMO + Easy + Name Brand = Sales

This is designed for average Joe (or Jane) who thinks that crypto mining sounds neat but are baffled by the mechanics. They are looking for an easy all-in-one solution from a brand they've heard of. Crypto wallets confuse them so they're fine with letting someone else handle it. Electricity consumption doesn't bother them any more than it does when they turn on their air conditioner.

I assume this will be successful (to Norton, not the customer).

The only surprising thing is that PayPal didn't think of it first.

China reveals plan to pump out positive news about itself. Let's see what happens when that lands with social media fact-checkers

HildyJ Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: It'll take more than that

The sad thing is that we don't. The masses judge by what the influencers they follow say.

Japan to dangle as many Yen as it takes to lure chipmakers to its shores, because everyone else is doing it too

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

Join the club

This seems to be the new normal. Countries are scrambling to bring chip production in house. We've recently seen South Korea and the United States initiate similar programs (and I probably missed some European announcements).

The big question, in my mind, is how this will be accomplished? If the goal is to do more than just bribe an existing player to build a foundry in your country you get into questions of who is going to fund it, build it, own it, operate it, and direct it; none of which are easily resolved in a democracy with competing political and economic interests.

It will be interesting to see how it sorts out.

South Korea's first fully indigenous rocket now on launch pad, ready for tests

HildyJ Silver badge
Pint

Re: From next to nothing - Corrections

They didn't start from a blank slate - they've been building shorter range rockets for years and have already launched a satellite with a Russian first stage and their own upper stages.

Comparing the development of a rocket to carry astronauts to a rocket to launch satellites and probes is an apples to oranges comparison.

I applaud them for what they've done. A pint of Hite maekju for the boffins.

OpenPGP library RNP updates after Thunderbird decrypt-no-recrypt bug squashed

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Note to author

The author does provide the version number, 0.15.1.

I'm not sure that the date of the patch is significant if you're relying on a distro package manager. As you point out, the packages are not always current and pulling a new package tomorrow is no guarantee that it includes the new RNP version.

VC's paper claims cost of cloud is twice as much as running on-premises. Let's have a look at that

HildyJ Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: There is a reason ...

I think the study sums it up nicely: "you’re crazy if you don’t start in the cloud; you're crazy if you stay on it." The use case depends upon the age and size of the company in most cases.

At least until you get to be a large corporation and the beancounters take over.

Surviving eclipse season and resurrecting 25-year-old software with Windows for Workgroups 3.11: One year with Mars Express

HildyJ Silver badge
Angel

Re: some are working remotely.

Awaiting the On Call article.

South Korea rounds up chipmakers and hyperscalers to build AI and server processors

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

More competition for their foundry business (and AMD's and TSMC's businesses) eventually, maybe.

Right now it looks like this is set up to compete mainly with smaller Chinese foundries.

Bribery charges against Apple's global security boss dismissed in iPads-for-gun-permits case

HildyJ Silver badge
Angel

Re: Dirty Harry

He could give a whole new twist to the battle with Epic Games.

Firefox 89: Can this redesign stem browser's decline?

HildyJ Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: What does it take...

Already had the coffee. I need something stronger.

AWS ECS Anywhere goes live. Is it worth the Amazon fee?

HildyJ Silver badge
Devil

Spare a thought and a bit of coin for Jeff. Superyachts are expensive.

Check the TUPE: Facebook's hire of Bloomsbury AI founders wasn't 'traditional' acquisition - so sacked bod can't claim law was broken

HildyJ Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: "each cofounder had been hired individually – and therefore TUPE didn’t apply"

It doesn't say much about his AI chops if he can't distinguish between "we want to hire you" and "we want to buy your company."

I assume he knew the difference and chose the option that would give him more money, which is fine. But doing some due diligence about what that means if it doesn't work out is always necessary.

Space junk damages International Space Station's robot arm

HildyJ Silver badge
Facepalm

Junk

As far as first world humanity is concerned Junk in Spaaaaace makes headlines and Junk on Earth (not pollution or climate change, just junk) doesn't.

AMD teases '3D V-Cache' tech that stacks cores and SRAM, delivers 15% boost to today's Ryzen CPUs

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

Intel's Lakefield chips are the first to incorporate their 3D stacking technology (Foveros). It's currently available in the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Fold and the Samsung Galaxy Book S.

https://newsroom.intel.com/news/up-close-lakefield-intels-chip-award-winning-foveros-3d-tech/

Silicon foundries surge to new revenue records, but Texas cold snap sent Samsung backwards

HildyJ Silver badge
Devil

Re: Drought in Taiwan

Admittedly, I do tend to think of Texas as a third world country.

Congestion or a Christmas cock-up? A Register reader throws himself under the bus

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

In America OS/2 gained a following in finance, while it was available. It dominated ATMs and Point of Sale devices for a long time. Unfortunately IBM never learned how to market to the masses outside of their select client list.

TCP alternative QUIC reaches IETF's Standards Track after eight years of evolution

HildyJ Silver badge
Boffin

If it gets rid of . . .

If it gets rid of TCP, I will be pleased.

And if Microsoft's open source version, MsQuic, can supplant Google's version, I will applaud.

Giving kudos to Microsoft hurts my brain but lately they seem to be earning them. At least their naming committee is still stupid. I suppose we should be glad that they didn't name it Quicky.

US nuclear weapon bunker security secrets spill from online flashcards since 2013

HildyJ Silver badge
Devil

I predict the response

They will issue a new, enhanced, and at least an order of magnitude more expensive contract to one of their tried and true contractors to implement a flash card training system which can handle Sensitive Compartmented Information. They will shove it into the Black Budget with no oversight. We won't know anything about it until its data is left exposed to the public. And it will be.

Refurb your enthusiasm: Apple is selling an 8-year-old desktop for over £5k

HildyJ Silver badge
Facepalm

Not that anyone else here will care but your brand of nostalgia grinds my gears.

Let's start with they're faster. The best selling car in 1980 and 1981 was the Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, the best selling car (not a pickup or SUV) was a Toyota Camry. The base car Olds had a 6 cylinder 3.8 liter V-6 with 103 hp and a 3 speed automatic which would get it to 60 in around 15 seconds. The base Toyota has a 4 cylinder 2.5 liter I-4 with 203 hp and an 8 speed automatic which will get it to 60 in around 8 seconds.Given its bigger tires, better brakes, and better suspension, it would run rings around the Cutlass on a track.

That's before you talk about safety, ergonomics, and quality, plus all the electronics you don't like.

P.S. Buying the Trashcan Mac was and is stupid. Another Apple form over function.

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