* Posts by YetAnotherLocksmith

633 posts • joined 11 Oct 2012

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Report details how Airbus pilots saved the day when all three flight computers failed on landing

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Only on landing?

Easily avoided by whom? The AIs, which didn't avoid it correct it, and instead crashed? No, by the pilots, who up until the systems all crash won't know that it is about to do nothing, leaving them as a pair to "stand on the anchors" as verse thrust fails... with, according to this report, under 3 seconds notice, and a scant 10m before running out of runway. Which at landing speeds is ~0.03 seconds of delay. 0.06s slower and they'd have been 10m into a ditch!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: how long is each FCPC allowed to be failed for?

If the pilots haven't been told this, they might be quite surprised!

A huge issue with a lot of these automated systems is that they seem to work, but aren't really, and then they turn the job over to the pilot/driver/random bus "operators" so they take the blame for the crash 0.08 seconds later!

The crushed blind judoka at the Paralympics a few weeks ago is a great example - both "bus operators" said they thought the man crossing at the crossing would stop when he saw the AI bus wasn't stopping! Except he had right of way and was, you know, blind.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Automation Issue

Bit of a cock-up if you're doing a touch & go, or if there's a sudden reason to go around, eh! "computer says" isn't great in a world of moving parts and excitement.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: "I can stop a car much quicker without the interference of the ABS system."

But, being a dumb system, it has zero clue whether *this* is one of those times it is needed, or not. Or *now*, etc.

Anyone who can't slide a 4 wheel vehicle through a gap with the brakes locked solid or failed or on ice, shouldn't be on the road. The ABS can hammer all it likes, but we aren't stopping unless it lets some snow build up under the static wheels - which ABS won't allow.

Actual AI could stop the car faster, assuming it can switch the ABS, traction control, etc in real time. And that it hasn't crashed...

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: WTH?

That wasn't the problem though.

The computer got an input it didn't like. It threw a fault. That passed the input to the next computer, which also didn't like it, and threw a fault. And passed it to the third, and bingo! You've got the hat trick of fail.

The inputs were all correct. That's the big issue to me - legitimate, correct actions causing complete failure, because it's a bit of an edge case.

Please, no Moore: 'Law' that defined how chips have been made for decades has run itself into a cul-de-sac

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Yes but...

They already are opaque.

That isn't the biggest issue though. When driving a car along a road, you literally have skin in the game. The oncoming car driver does too. And so you know, and they know, that you're going to pass them, not ram them, and that works both ways.

An AI car has no such self preservation imperative. If it crashes, it lives on. You don't, though.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Yes but...

The day we model a human brain...

Can you imagine an intelligent human that has read the top 50% of the internet and most of the books, and hopefully wasn't completely insane?

Sadly, it's likely to be trapped in a basement by someone like Steve Baboon and used to keep the status quo.

US labor official suggests Amazon's Alabama workers rerun that unionization vote

YetAnotherLocksmith

I can see why you went anon for that post, matey. I wouldn't have put my name to something so stupid either!

84-year-old fined €250,000 for keeping Nazi war machines – including tank – in basement

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Ha!

To be fair, I don't think the 84yo was a dedicated terrorist either.

Malaysian Police crush crypto-mining kit to punish electricity thieves

YetAnotherLocksmith

They don't have anything that's much use for that though, they are dedicated ASIC rigs without even a graphics card output.

Selling them as export would've been far more sensible.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Ecological vandalism

This is exactly what I said!

Sell the lot to those licensed to have it, or stick it on ebay USA or whatever and export it.

Stupid publicity stunt.

This page has been deliberately left blank

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: "We are still very keen to donate some of the proceeds to the cause"

Except just like a game of D&D, the players are also the games master. And they take it in turns. See Boris giving the job of Corruption Manager to another one of the bods from his Etonian days photo!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Britney Spears is a good local girl

At least, after literally decades, she actually has a lawyer now! One that she has picked and that is working for her, not for <drum roll> the Trust!

The main issue is, there was no-one looking out for her, as even her lawyer was controlled by her trust, controlled by her dad. So the person meant to push back against everything her dad wanted, was working for her dad. How that was allowed, I can only assume it was large sums of money, really...

Google fined €500m for not paying French publishers after using their words on web

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Send in the bailiffs?

And France can get the EU to back it, which will affect Google Ireland. And Google won't want to pull out of the richest economic block in the world.

Google killed desktop Drive and replaced it with two apps. Now it’s killing those, and Drive for desktop is returning

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: how do you talk to google???

Just shout "Ok, google" in any of 3 bazillion households?

Whether the reply is any use, though, is another matter entirely.

Windows 11 still doesn't understand our complex lives – and it hurts

YetAnotherLocksmith

We dropped using Teams and switched to Discord. Ironic since we are now all able to see what we type and send files, etc far better, so actually less discord!

YetAnotherLocksmith

You might change your mind when you realise that it is just polite ransomware, and that you have no access to videos, bookmarks, music, work or even money unless you go as they demand. :-/

I have three Google accounts due to weird YouTube vs Google vs company thing. It's a pain, but I rarely use any of them, at least I rarely use any of them *on purpose* - they are always there, watching...

Radioactive hybrid terror pigs have made themselves a home in Fukushima's exclusion zone

YetAnotherLocksmith

Pretty sure the passenger pigeon would disagree. Except they're extinct.

And there was that Chinese famine caused after they killed all the birds which brought down the food chain causing overabundance of insects and then famine. Though considering millions of humans also died, maybe that should go down as a draw?

NTT slashes top execs’ pay as punishment for paying more than their share of $500-a-head meals with government officials

YetAnotherLocksmith

Gosh, a punishment that seems to fit the crime!

The UK could learn lessons.

Fastly 'fesses up to breaking the internet with an 'an undiscovered software bug' triggered by a customer

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Fastly 'fesses up'

That you don't realise what you say is impossible is worrying.

"rollout patches over months" can't work in a web environment where patches are reverse engineered to find the core vulnerability within hours, and the threat du jour is hammering a million firewalls and gateways within the hour via automated weakness scanners.

Oh, and there's a patch or update every single day on any complex system these days - Windows itself does it once a week on Tuesday, what day does every other service, daemon and driver get updated? And you want to wait a week?

The server is down, money is not being made, and you want me to fix what?

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Happy ending

I was at Warton, and wow, it wasn't half a job to input the hours across some of the schemes! Plus it was running on some antique VAX/VMS what you had to telnet into (iirc - it has been a while) and the screen updates could take 30 seconds per key press! It took some staff half a day on a Friday...

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: 'Delegation'

Tender about it, you say?

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Dark Monitor

That's pretty standard. It makes sure pesky hackers can't remote in and watch you "working". I don't trust it as much as the sliding cover I added though.

You want a reboot? I'll give you a reboot! Happy now?

YetAnotherLocksmith

Illegally renaming tables, by the sounds of it!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: "It's the database the police use" ...

The database *was* up to date when the driver left. And since it is illegal to use your computer while driving, and stopping on a motorway would cause bigger issues, the law, as ever, is an ass.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: A couple of decades ago

Returning "1" is safer!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Background

That's a very good solution.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Background

Even if they haven't! My parents have two very visually different versions of windows, depending if they're logged in as "pleb" or "admin". They need the admin password because Windows does stuff often enough that demands it, but the staff have access to the computer too, so passwords are needed.

To have one floppy failure is unlucky. To have 20 implies evil magic or a very silly user

YetAnotherLocksmith

Well, the student was there to learn, and so he did!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Square disks

The clue is definitely in the name! "Disc"

YetAnotherLocksmith

And now the deformed disc at the other end is definitely not going to work!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Rubber band

It completely stops any transfer of vibration from the motor to the drive, in case you're still wondering why they did that.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: ... a user will somehow always misunderstand

See, that's scary. How fast things move on...

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Labels

My first line manager, many years ago, did IT for a certain very large company that outsourced all their IT. Because he knew what he was doing, and I knew what a computer did, we got on well. Bill, his name was. Hopefully he's still retired and on his dream canal boat...

Anyway, point is, he stored the department floppy disc for transferring stuff between networks (as only he had permissions) on his computer case side, pinned in place with quite a powerful magnet. And the disc always seemed to work just fine!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: The worst journey in the World

That would be because once super-cold, the ice doesn't melt under the pressure from the runners, and so your sledge doesn't slide any more.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: The endless story

Making the other party have to do even a tiny level of work to get what they want often gives you months of time to play with!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: The endless story

Cook it until it burns, then take it off 3 minutes before that.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: if it works...

That is home automation, not IoT. The internet at large doesn't really need to know you just got home, or that you just went out for the day.

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: if it works...

I can see a great use case for it, but only if you're using it as a CNC DIY waterjet cutter. Which is obviously really common, and that's why they've added it.

Sarcasm existing in this response is left as an exercise for the reader.

Nominet ignores advice, rejects serious change despite losing CEO, chair, half its board in membership vote

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: "maybe around kilobyte of storage"

And that receptionist simply said, to every caller who was confused, "Sorry [Sir/Madam], you'll need to take that up with the people you are actually paying money to for your domain hosting, email and server hosting." You can parallel that up fairly well, fairly easily.

There's no need for much of the cruft of Nominet, and they are clearly not fit for purpose.

Name True, iCloud access false: Exceptional problem locks online storage account, stumps Apple customer service

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: What about her sons?

Underrated comment, that.

SpaceX wins UK regulator Ofcom's approval for its Starlink mobile broadband base stations

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: 42,000 satellites up there.

"Sorry sir, you'll have to wait 4.5 years to launch that probe to pluto."

"Orbital mechanics means we have to laugh in 2 years, otherwise it's impossible for another 450 years!"

"That can't be right! Some commentard on the Register said it would be fine!"

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: OneWeb

They sure can pay themselves though!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Dish...

It would only move occasionally, otherwise it would simply wear out. Plus, things moving under their own automatic control probably wouldn't be allowed without safety precautions, even on the ladder high side of a house (it could push you off the ladder)

We used to have a big dish, 30 years ago. It would move to switch satellites. Except we very rarely did. Imagine the surprise when it crushed a load of bushes and half the rotary drier one day!

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Too Late ?

They also promised that last Christmas, and the year before that, etc. Almost like they are serial liars, and the public forgets every time...

YetAnotherLocksmith

I think that's because they don't understand the concept, to be honest. Discussions I've had have been fruitless, despite line of sight to their main tower, "it is too far" at 7km.

YetAnotherLocksmith

With a VPN (to stop data harvesting by Starlink, obviously) who would ever know?

YetAnotherLocksmith

I think you're missing that there are TWELVE THOUSAND satellites, not 12. It more than triples the number. There are currently only 6000 in total, and that's including the 1200 Musk has already launched.

You can't "filter it out" when it's half a dozen superbright streaks across the image. Do you even astronomy, bro?

India dangles billion-dollar incentive scheme for server, PC makers willing to open up shop on the sub-continent

YetAnotherLocksmith

They should take that money and invest it in actually having a rule of law. No company in their right mind would go work in India currently. Tell a joke that even one person doesn't like, and that's jail for you. Worse, the culture of large groups of men with sticks beating men to death and raping women for alleged offence caused means that sending skilled (or any!) staff over is incredibly unwise.

See https://time.com/5938047/munawar-iqbal-faruqui-comedian-india/ for instance, from just a few days ago. Would you move there?

EncroChat hack case: RAM, bam... what? Data in transit is data at rest, rules UK Court of Appeal

YetAnotherLocksmith

Re: Wrong reasoning, right result.

To be fair, it is/was an international drug, torture and generally not-nice crime gang, and the French and Belgian and other EU police forces also had these criminals in their country. They gave us the info to be nice, not because they had to. They simply went in and grabbed everything they could. What we do with it is our business, as long as we don't upset anything for the nice gendarmes...

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