* Posts by JCitizen

740 posts • joined 16 Jul 2012

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REvil ransomware gang publishes 'Elexon staff's passports' after UK electrical middleman shrugs off attack

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Go

Re: Why is passport data in a company server

Here in the US, everyone has to have a copy of their birth certificate, and a Social Security card, and a driver's license, if they do drive. It has been that way for 20 or more years now. No passport needed. If no DL is available a state ID will suffice; just for the official picture. Everywhere I was employed they actually checked the documents to see if they looked legitimate and matched each other on data points. One change that happened recently is that Medicare cards no longer pass for SS ID; because they changed the number on the Medicare cards to protect the SS ID.

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Megaphone

Re: Log all the things

About 98% of ransomware attacks can be prevented by a complicated set of Microsoft Management Console configurations. I fount this out by testing such against the early types of ransomware by testing a product that does the setting by batch file, called CryptoPrevent; however they sold out to a new firm, and I don't know if I trust them yet. Hire a good Microsoft Certified Software Engineer and get the settings that way, and add heuristics on top of that. I think FooliSH-IT used Bit-defender for the heuristic control. That was the original company.

Remember when Republicans said Dems hacked voting systems to rig Georgia's election? There were no hacks

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Alert

Re: A dry run for trumps loss in 2020

@LucreLout - In a way that is exactly what the US electoral college does. It allows for victory by popular vote as long as all opposing votes are in lower number that the popular vote for one candidate. In other words, if the opposing party and all other party votes add up to more numbers, then the college kicks in. Since all votes count; the representatives of the college cover all parties involved and can throw in for whatever candidate they think can still win. Even Hillary could have garnered that vote, but she pulled a beginners stunt and assumed she was so popular that the college didn't matter; that doesn't go down well with those representatives, that plan can backfire on you, and it did. There are several instances in US history where the college tipped the balance. I say it is a good system - especially when you get too many parties involved in the national general election. It is the same disaster that happened to the Weimar Republic.

To test its security mid-pandemic, GitLab tried phishing its own work-from-home staff. 1 in 5 fell for it

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Coffee/keyboard

@doublelayer

Indeed! Back when PayPal used to put a lot of active graphic content in their emails. I received one that made it through Microsoft filters, because the miscreant copied the images correctly but they weren't active, so it made it to my inbox. Now of course, this email also had my full name on it (probably from the Equifax breach), and it fooled me thoroughly. However, after clicking on it, and noticing a totally legit looking login page, my password manager refused to fill the forms. SAVED BY MY PASSWORD MANAGER! *PHEW*!!!

I was never so embarrassed in my life! Needless to say, I reported it to PayPal's spoof address, and the technicians at PayPal were impressed with the caginess of this spoofer! I no longer get active image communications from PayPal, but I don't click on the one link they have either. I've also set my filter to exclusive, which is as high as I can go.

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Alert

Phish report..

@It's just me

When I get a phishing email on my Outlook.com web based email account; I never again see the same email, or even close to it, right after I report it. I also get a response from Microsoft thanking me for doing it. I only get a phishing email maybe once a month on average. Other suspicious spam I only get maybe twice a week(ordinary type mostly).

NASA's Human Spaceflight boss hits eject a week before SpaceX crew launch

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Go

Re: Going while the going's good

@Timbo

Have you been reading the Sally Ride report? She recommended the same thing, and even suggested it was the best method of hopping to Mars.

UK takes a step closer to domestic launches as Skyrora fires up Skylark-L

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Go

Good to see..

I'm surprised to see this launch test story so soon after the article about the abandoned Blue Streak (or was it Black Arrow?)UK launch test center! I wonder why they couldn't just us that old facility. It already had the proper flame containment and everything. Or is this a strictly nationalistic move? I don't know that much about UK rivalries, so forgive me for my ignorance.

Tech's Volkswagen moment? Trend Micro accused of cheating Microsoft driver QA by detecting test suite

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FAIL

Re: They have a credibility problem.

Well - they do now - with me at least. Up until about 2005, Trend Micro was THE antivirus to use, and every office I worked in had adopted to it, so I also bought it for my machines. However it went down hill fast, and I've not seen any evidence it deserves retesting yet. However, I must also admit that probably NO antivirus is very good at detecting the new malware out there, and you are probably better off simply clamping down on vulnerabilities on the OS and all applications on the machine.

I can see Trend's frustration with this, and can even understand why they may have thought using underhanded methods was fighting fire with fire - but it just doesn't work out to be a success for the future. I haven't and won't be recommending Trend Micro for a great while now - they'd have to build up trust all over again for me.

Remember when Securus was sued for recording 14,000 calls between prison inmates and lawyers? It just settled

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Devil

Re: A slightly different story but same Idea.

HA! HA! This is Kansas; we don't cotton to no damn Yankee's getting in our biniss here! LOL!

Magecart malware merrily sipped card details, evaded security scans on UK e-tailer Páramo for almost 8 months

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WTF?

PayPal??

Why would PayPal use a CVV code? Maybe they were directing PayPal to use a credit card on record at PayPal? Seems like using PayPal credit should have solved most of the problem - at least of getting any funds.

If they can attack a PayPal credit transaction like this without using a credit card, you would be better off using something like the browser app downloaded from Capitol One, that assigns payment to only the retail store you are doing business with. If the crook tries to use the same card data, even with the CVV code,l it will not work and the crook loses. I believe it is called Eno ®

There are several credit cards with similar features, and even a free well known web site that lets you create a single transaction credit file for doing the same thing. The URL escapes me at the moment, but any web search would easily turn it up.

India opens its space industry to private companies

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WTF?

Risk?

Guiana Space Centre - Isn't that controlled by the French? How risky is it for India to entrust their entire launch program to foreign soil locations?

You can't have it both ways: Anti-coronavirus masks may thwart our creepy face-recog cameras, London cops admit

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Meh

Re: Why bother?

It is a wonder armed robberies haven't gone up now that everyone is wearing a mask; nobody would notice if a bank robber walked into a bank wearing one!

Quick Q: Er, why is the Moon emitting carbon? And does this mean it wasn't formed from Theia hitting Earth?

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Pint

Re: It was the Apollo astronauts

I had a pellet cooker that made absolutely the best cook out quisine I'v ever consumed. It had a glow starter for the pellets, but was supposed to be a slow cooker, as that is what made the food so good. I just had to start a little earlier cooking, but a remote temperature gauge allowed me to go inside and prepare other items, so it didn't seem slow at all.

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Go

Re: And this is why it's always a bad idea...

I must say as a layman, and not a professional scientist, that it is easier to believe moons were simply separate bodies that formed apart from the host planet, when you are talking about gas giants. Such large planets could easily capture a moon and it could still be a stable orbit. But with Earth sized planets the moons of Mars are the most believable captured into orbit, because they are much smaller and less massive. To see our moon so large and so close to the Earth is a wonder of planetary evolution to someone like me.

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Unhappy

Re: And this is why it's always a bad idea...

Now you've done it! You have spoiled my opinion of the BBC,which I previously thought the most truthful and unbiased news agency in the world! Oh woe is me! Is Al Jazeera the only one left? ;-)

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WTF?

Especially..

since something has to explain why Venus and Mars lost their molten cores at approximately the same time, or there abouts, and Earth didn't? The collision theory is the only one the makes sense at all. And no, I don't believe that water can act as a billion year space blanket to keep the core molten. In fact, if anything it should have accelerated the cool down.

Fake crypto-wallet extensions appear in Chrome Web Store once again, siphoning off victims' passwords

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FAIL

Re: That's a good idea

Well at least the same amount of people who think Chrome's password vault is secure! They wouldn't actually need your manager if they used the built in "service". /s

Now there's nothing stopping the PATRIOT Act allowing the FBI to slurp web-browsing histories without a warrant

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FAIL

Re: 1st Amendement

Pretty much like yelling fire in a crowded theater - the 1st Amendment does have its limits.

20 years deep into a '2-year' mission: How ESA keeps Cluster flying

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Go

Re: "It's a very strong design,"

LOL!! That was what I was thinking; it gives me a warm fuzzy feeling to see such a good use of research money, and stretching it out so far, means science gets a BIG bang for the buck. I too would like to propose a toast to the boffins of this project. Here! Here!!

Hana-hana-hana: No it's not your dad trying to start a motorboat... It's Northern Gas, renewing its SAP software

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FAIL

Re: "a contract worth £5,985,385.60 over five years"

Northern?... Isn't that company the one that went under with Enron a while ago? With the price of natural gas being so cheap, I'm surprised they have any money at all!

Vietnam alleged to have hacked Chinese organisations in charge of COVID-19 response

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Megaphone

Re: So just why it needs to look at China's virus-fighters is unclear.

I say more power to them - China could end up a worse threat than Vietnam ever was to the US. We are already nearing the same numbers as what we lost in that war, just with a viral outbreak. There is enough evidence to show that this pandemic is a little suspicious, but no real proof yet. I love the Chinese and Vietnamese people, but I don't hold the same regard for PRC leadership.

India says 'Zoom is a not a safe platform' and bans government users

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Trollface

Well.. It's safer than COVID-19

That is the reason most people use it - I doubt the gubbamint has enough smarts to set up a "secure" service like that.

Google: We've blocked 126 million COVID-19 phishing scams in the past week

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Boffin

And how does one verify a url before clicking on a link to it?

Several ways, but the two methods I use are to hover my mouse over the link to see what is the actual address; IIRC all browsers have this service, I look in the lower left corner of the Chrome window to see what the actual URL is, and see if it matches. Another method I use if they do match, is copy the link to a web search engine that supports Web Of Trust (WOT); this way I can see their reputation if they have one. So many new dodgy sites come up every day, that most of them will be unknown, but it is better than nothing. McAfee's Site Advisor used to be better, but the company has become a Potentially Unwanted Program (PUP) lately, and I just couldn't stand it any longer.

CORRECTION: the name was changed to "WebAdvisor". {McAfee}

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Megaphone

Re: Pointless

That is exactly what I was thinking reading this article - if Google is so good at this game, how come they can't reduce the spam in my GMAIL account? In fact I quit using it, and just keep it as a junk email account now.

Windows gets a lot of flak, but their Outlook web based email at live(dot)com is the best I've ever used. I might get two to three junk mails every two weeks; but just lately I've received at least three PayPal phishing attempts in one week! I reported all of them to PayPal's spoof address, and marked them as such so Outlook would recognize them next time, and they have stopped for now.

NASA dons red and blue cardboard 3D glasses to drive Curiosity rover because its GPUs are stuck in the office

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Coat

LCD glasses back in the 80's

That beats what I was going to point out, that I had LCD shutter glasses for my monitor, which was a 61" LED DLP HDTV bought in 2008 - you would think all devices are 3D capable by now. The cost wouldn't even be a problem because of the rule of manufacture by scale. It all seems so old now - but quite funny with the even older moldy oldie dual color cardboards!!

It's official! Space travel increases the brain size of astronauts, even when they're back on Mother Earth

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Angel

Rotating stations..

I always liked the one in 2010 Space Odyssey called the Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov; it was voted by some group I don't remember, as being the most realistic space craft in sci-fi movies.

Astroboffins suspect twin-star smash may be the culprit for most biggest and brightest supernova yet spotted

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Devil

More?

More bigglier? =)

Consumer reviewer Which? finds CAN bus ports on Ford and VW, starts yelling 'Security! We have a problem...'

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FAIL

Just a reminder here...

that researchers have proven they can access a car's auto park system remotely without physical access or permission, and invoke anything the car is capable of. Just imagine if they could over rule safeties and tell the vehicle to auto park while you are going 70 mph?!! No one has proven they can't as of yet. The police would simply list the accident as "driver lost control" and that would be it - no one the wiser. And you know they aren't going to check either.

Academic showdown as boffins biff-baff over when Version 1.0 of Earth's magnetic core was released

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Pint

One question....er...maybe three?

Okay --- why have Venus and Mars obviously lost their magnetic fields long ago - probably longer ago than these recent guesses by geologists..? How old is the lunar soil? I thought this was already answered because of those three points. The Earth was completely reformed at the time period that is agreed on by geologists - however a giant collision reset the clock. The whole Earth Moon system was a giant blob of bubbling lava, the oceans just converted to steam like the atmosphere of Venus is now. If fact we would probably look just like Venus now, if some extraordinary realities were not present at that time.

If you change one factor just a little bit, it could be that water is the answer - maybe Earth had just that much more of it, and the collision was too slow to blow it all off, and so it enveloped the Earth Moon system in a black cloud until the lack of Sunlight froze the magma bubble into a sphere. Then by pure chaos, the water condensed from this frozen core and once again covered the earth - the moon however cooled too soon, even though it was every close to the Earth, and lost all its water by the Earth's gravitational pull, and the lack of a Van Allen belt. Its my theory and I'm sticking to it. The Bible arguments are so silly, when even a Christian knows they are just parables and nothing else - it wasn't necessary for God to explain himself, He is the Creator after all, He doesn't have to explain anything. I think I'll have a celebration tomorrow and have a pint to the Great One!

NASA reveals the new wavy Martian wheels it thinks can crush the red planet

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Black Helicopters

Re: Air traffic

Where's your black helicopter badge?

Antarctic science put on ice by coronavirus – next summer's expeditions restricted to essentials and robots

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Megaphone

Why is everyone concerned about TP,

when anyone with an ounce of intelligence knows a bidet is way cheaper? (and way cleaner - Doh!)

Atlassian issues advice on how to keep your IT service desk secure... after hundreds of portals found facing the internet amid virus lockdown

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Meh

Re: Rather inevitable wasn't it ?

Too bad Secunia PSI has been shut down - it was one of the best for years at finding the vulns in apps and OS for years! Now I have to rely on OPatch to hopefully provide some minimal security!

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FAIL

Re: Just because you cannot see someone, does not mean they are not there.

Another example of dumb companies(corporations) that never take security seriously; aggravated by the COVID-19 reality - Oh Well!

Good luck pitching a tent on exoplanet WASP-76b, the bloody raindrops here are made out of molten iron

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Thumb Up

Re: Puzzled!

Thanks to HelpfulJohn and Cuddles for those responses, I now have a better grasp on orbital planetary birth, and the exceptions there of.

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Devil

Re: Apologies to Burt Bacharach

I could hear the tune in my head while reading that! HA!

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IT Angle

Re: Puzzled!

Why couldn't it be rotating on its axis pointed to the star? I seem to remember one of the planets in our system does that. Boffins say they think it got hit by something big in the past to knock it off the usual axis.

Want to see through walls? Electroboffins build tiny chip in the lab that vibrates at just the right frequency to do it

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Black Helicopters

One negative consequence..

I can think of - is this could enhance the attacks nation state bad actors are using against diplomatic persons and their aids; like those we've seen in the news ; acquiring mysterious afflictions of bad health and resigning their positions stating they left because of these mysterious maladies caused by such attacks. The causes proposed by the news media included some kind of microwave radiation, or radar - Just a thought!

It's time to track people's smartphones to ensure they self-isolate during this global pandemic, says WHO boffin

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Megaphone

Re: Absolutely every mobile can be tracked

Even back woods police departments in the US have that same capability, so they can find accidents without GPS. Like you said, if it is mobile, they can find you if it is turned on - and maybe if it isn't, if you have blabby apps on board. Yes, some older dumb phones have apps.

Remember that blurry first-ever photo of a black hole? Turns out snaps like that can tell us a lot about these matter-gobbling voids

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Coat

Re: Nothing propagates across the event horizon.

I think I know just enough to make a short observation - I think we laypeople forget that gravity has a relatively short range - just looking at the equation shows that up - so this is why science has been in a quandary about dark matter, because the mass of the universe doesn't somehow track with what gravitational effects should be in that elusive "theory of everything" that physicists are endlessly chasing after. Or at least the movement of the galaxy doesn't track with gravity itself, it doesn't explain what is holding this whirlpool together.

Mine's the one with the .32 ACP pocket pistol please!

Broadcom sues Netflix for its success: You’re stopping us making a fortune from set-top boxes, moans chip designer

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FAIL

Re: Why not sue Youtube too?

For sure! What a load of bollocks! They might as well sue the cable companies too, because my cable went to streaming only, so now if you want "cable" TV, you just need an internet connection and either a PC, Smart TV, or one of those Fire TV stick type of wireless devices. I watch my cable on an "app" on my PC browser now. I like it MUCH better. No more renting DVRs or other boxes from the cable company.

Avast pulls plug on insecure JavaScript engine in its security software suite

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Pirate

ARRGGH!!

Avast ye matey - yer used ta be a fine warrior, ye wuz; but now ye must walk the plank!!

ExoMars team delays 2020 Red Planet road trip after failing to complete all necessary testing

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Stop

Better to test than...

end up with a drill that can't even drill into the Martian surface. That one was pretty silly!

Broken lab equipment led boffins to solve a 58-year-old physics problem by mistake

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Re: Curiosity is a wonderful thing

Good points, I like your comparisons - thanks for commenting! Spintronics never seemed to take off, and that is probably why. I was always wondering if it were possible to disturb the spin of the valence shells, then almost anything could knock that out of kilter and result in data loss. I think the early laser experiments made more sense, as they theoretically could have been more permanent. Obviously it did't work as it looks like they abandoned that scheme.

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Re: Serendipetydoodah!

I can see how it could be confusing for us unfamiliar with deeper nuclear physics. I'm sure you are right because of the discussions in the article about core nucleus perturbances under the valence shells. IIRC the first time I read about spintronics, they were experimenting with using lasers and silicone based storage mediums - so things have changed a lot with that research as well.

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Megaphone

Re: Curiosity is a wonderful thing

I disagree there is no application - can you imagine how shrunken the space data storage would use with each atom spinning in its own direction, using any degree of spin in 360 degrees? it would also possibly make binary computing obsolete. You would no longer need just zeros an ones; but a whole zoo of combinations as various as a master encryption method!!

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IT Angle

Re: Serendipetydoodah!

I'm sure this is an interesting method, for something that took so long, but I really wonder how this is different from an easier path discovered years ago through what is called "spintronics"? I would think industry would sooner use the easy way to play.

Russia-backed crew's latest malware has discerning taste – when screening visitors to poisoned watering holes

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Joke

Re: False flags

No the Americans who are Democrats would be convinced that even a real Iranian attack was the fault of the Russians. Everything is the fault of the Russians now, and their orange minion in the White House. Haven't you been reading the news?

US Congress: Spying law is flawed, open to abuse, and lacking in accountability – so let's reauthorize it

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Hate to admit it but...

my stupid fellow Americans are okay with unconstitutional acts like this as long as they seem to be successful, but not one object of these investigations was successful - in fact there was only one failure FISA led investigation, that didn't turn up any terrorists in the end. The ONLY reason the US has had some success is because the various agencies were finally allowed to share information. And THAT is all that was necessary - Homeland security was that sharing instrument, and the only part of that success - but the media seems complacent not to point that out. At least the majority of the media doesn't.

Boots on Moon? Well, the boot part is right: Audit of NASA's Space Launch System reveals more delays, cost overruns

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FAIL

Re: "somebody needs to officially tell Congress"

Yep, and just like the same companies have done to NASA since the old moon program, it is just one cost over run and another. Business as usual. If NASA wanted to get to the moon on time and on budget, it would be more likely to just let Space - X do it.

The Reg produces exhibit A1: A UK court IT system running Windows XP

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Meh

Re: Is this as ususal software related?

eBay

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