* Posts by richardcox13

390 posts • joined 19 May 2012

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Windows 10 Insider wondering where Notepad has gone? Fear not, Microsoft found it down the back of Dev Channel

richardcox13

> a programming language

Singular? It would be some time ago.

These days there's JS (and not just inside IE and Edge), VB Script, cmd, and PowerShell. .NET is included so both C# and VB.NET compilers are there.

Add WSL with a distribution and you've got bash etc. as well.

So a very long way from a programming language.

Microsoft emits a colourful Windows Terminal preview

richardcox13

Re: Open Cmd Here?

Because typing wt is harder?

richardcox13

Re: Open Cmd Here?

Would it interest you that this has existed in standard Windows 10 for ages?

In Explorer, navigate to a folder, and click on File: either cmd or PowerShell to open at the select folder (plus as administrator options).

Faxing hell: The cops say they would very much like us to stop calling them all the time

richardcox13

Re: I called the cops

As noted in a reply this should be 011 (memory gets worse in time, but is better than the alternative).

richardcox13

Re: I called the cops

In the North American calling zone 11 is the international prefix, the 44 would then follow.

AWS scoops Intel silicon and 8TB of storage into new Snowcone edge box

richardcox13

From a certain well none Ex-Amazon Employee

Time Bray about thisL

I’ve held one of these in my hands. One use-case is a video shooter taking it out in hostile conditions. Dunno if it’ll be popular, but it’s a super-cool piece of gear.

So at least one part of this is for those cases where, some a time, there is no expectation on connectivity.

An Internet of Trouble lies ahead as root certificates begin to expire en masse, warns security researcher

richardcox13

Re: Of course if they weren't so greedy ....

TV on and get it down an aerial and it is not encrypted, indeed everybody can snoop and see the traffic if they want.

Third parties cannot see what you are watching in that case. Or see traffic from you back to the source.

Both of which happen when using a streaming service.

RSS Feed Isn't Being Updated

richardcox13
Thumb Up

Re: RSS Feed Isn't Being Updated

Thanks

I had tried across multiple clients... so seems the CDN may have been the culprit.

richardcox13

RSS Feed Isn't Being Updated

https://www.theregister.com/headlines.rss hasn't been updated for a few days.

SpaceX Crew Dragon docks at International Space Station

richardcox13

SpaceX landed the Falcon 9 rocket used in this launch so it can be re-used.

I suspect it will be going to a museum rather than being reused.

In Rust, we lust: Security-focused super-C++ language still most loved among Stack Overflow denizens

richardcox13

Re: Basically tells you all you need to know about Stack Overflow users...

> I tend to believe TIOBE, i

Only if you want to see what employers think they want (which will largely be their legacy systems, combined with some bait and switch).

If you read the notes around the SO survey you'll find ~3% (IIRC) of respondents are using Rust. But a lot more of the respondents would like the opportunity to use Rust.

They've only gone and bloody done it! NASA, SpaceX send two fellas off to the International Space Station

richardcox13

Naming

The name is an homage to British science fiction author Iain M Banks' Culture series, in which he delighted in silly names for spaceships

Be careful, you might suggest a lack of gravitas!

Surprise! That £339 world's first 'anti-5G' protection device is just a £5 USB drive with a nice sticker on it

richardcox13
Holmes

As P. T. Barnum allegedly said: there are plenty being born.

The website is quite "fun", eg. this "testimonial":

I plugged the BioShield Key in at work and it seems to clear the energy of the place around my desk.

One minute and a half after I plugged it, I felt something wrong disappeared in the air.

The people I work with, seems to be more happy and they laugh more. The ambiance is more serene.

~Daniela

Well it always amusing when someone demonstrates how much of a muppet they are.

cmd.exe is dead, long live PowerShell: Microsoft leads aged command-line interpreter out into 'maintenance mode'

richardcox13

Re: Microsoft only have themselves to blame

On a one line script... not really,

On a script with a few hundred lines of code: yes.

richardcox13

Re: Microsoft only have themselves to blame

> The main question though is, why are Powershell commands so verbose?

Because PSH is optimised for maintainable scripts, rather than for doing everything as one offs from the command line or just playing code golf.

Code golf can be fun, but if you need to fix things at 2am written by a colleague who isn't available with a whole host of managers and their managers demanding a fix, being extra clear makes things less hard.

Turns out Elon can't control the weather – what a scrub: Rain, clouds delay historic manned SpaceX-NASA launch

richardcox13

Definitely the stream to watch, over the rather more scripted official streams.

Das reboot: That's the only thing to do when the screenshot, er, freezes

richardcox13

Re: Funny that

I just remove it

Windows Terminal hits the big 1.0: Fit for production?

richardcox13
WTF?

> Windows Terminal hits the big 1.0: Fit for production?

I know the answer to a question in a title should always be "no", in this case it is ready.

Not seen a crash for months while using every day with lots of interaction (esp. with git).

NUC NUC. Who's there? It's Intel, with a pint-sized 8-core Xeon workstation

richardcox13

Re: Have some Mint instead!

> US$2,499 + VAT...that is a lot of money for a desktop.

But not a huge amount for a workstation. Comparisons are with Dell Precision, Mac Pro and the like. (In this space a fully loaded up NUC Pro is low end.) Consider that price includes ~$1000 for a graphics card which will look pretty more if you want FPS for your FPS, but if you need maximum quality rendering then it is cheap.

Specialist machine for those with high end requirements.

Faster than reflection: Microsoft previews Source Generators for C#

richardcox13

Refection is not that slow (at least after the metadata is loaded for that type: the first time is slow). Unless you are measuring the performance you are just assuming.

ASP.NET MVC uses reflection heavily, and still manages to be massively faster than Web Forms (and as pages get more complex, even more so) and yet MVC uses reflection at its core.

As with anything performance beyond the simplest code it is far more subtle than you can predict.

Guess which cloud giant Zoom picked to handle millions more video calls? Bzzt, wrong answer: It's Oracle

richardcox13

Re: I hope they thought this through

> Zoom make you sign three year licensing deal

Not for personal usage they don't. And that is where much (if not almost all) of the growth has been. Families and friends keeping in contact.

Microsoft decrees that all high-school IT teachers were wrong: Double spaces now flagged as typos in Word

richardcox13

Re: spare disk space

Because the typefaces found on mechanical typewriters were typographic horrors.

Two spaces did help readability (as did double line spacing – which was required in many cases).

But with mechanical typewriters[1] being something for museums and hipsters, we should move on to better options.

Many people were taught two spaces, but that is because the teachers were taught that. This does not make it good.

[1] Outside parts of the Indian legal system IIRC.

richardcox13

Re: Isn't it just a historical anachronism?

> Double spacing, on old monospace typewriters, made it easier to tell where one sentence ends and the next begins.

More a case of when your only typeface is Courier, steps are needed to compensate,

I always liked TeX's approach: input is one space, but it detects end of sentences and puts in a slightly wider space (and then adjusts that for justification). These days with proportional typefaces a double space is too wide; this is helped by majuscule glyphs being bigger.

GCC 10 gets security bug trap. And look what just fell into it: OpenSSL and a prod-of-death flaw in servers and apps

richardcox13

Re: I believe OpenSSL was audited...

It was.

But neither an audit or extra compiler checks solve the halting problem.

Because it is insoluble.

Elevating cost-cutting to a whole new level with million-dollar bar bills

richardcox13

Re: Elevator interface

Reminds we of a story boardcast on (maybe RI Christmas Lecture when I was the right age... so a while ago!)

Some academic (so really a post-Grad or post-doc) had developed a really sensitive inclinometer in Aberdeen.And were confused by a not-quite 12 hour cycle in the readings when left sitting on a (very stable) surface.

Aberdeen.... built on lots of granite was moving with the tide.

Are you fixing that switch? Or setting it up as a Minecraft server?

richardcox13

Re: OK, so can run a game server on a switch

A typical home router contains:

- WAN modem (or multiple for ADSL and VDSL)

- Backup WAN connection

- Multiple Wi-Fi Access points (including a guest network)

- A LAN switch

- A router between LAN, multiple Wi-Fi and main and backup WAN connections.

- NAT, Firewall, DHS, DHCP, ... fuinctions

Guest Wi-Fi only routes to/from the WAN ports (no LAN access).

Yes, a lot more than a router, but most definitely a router making choices on which port to send a packet based on which subnet it came from in addition to its destination.

Considerable more capable than early IP routers...

UK's Cleveland Police: We want to fling our HR wares into the cloud. Oh, and IT can move back in

richardcox13

Re: £2.5m

But this is a lift and shift: not an ERP upgrade (or replacement) so none of that should be needed.

More a case of working through all dependencies and updating them to work with a different hosting solution, While definitely non-trivial this is a much more reasonable scope for a project.

A paper clip, a spool of phone wire and a recalcitrant RS-232 line: Going MacGyver in the wonderful world of hotel IT

richardcox13

Re: Remember serial breakout boxes?

Yes they were useful, but for real troubleshooting and testing a protocol analyser was even better.

A breakout box with an attached computer that would allow you to record and show you the data being sent. Along with changes to hardware signals. For when you wanted to push things programmable to emulate another device.

Like this.

Stack Overflow banishes belligerent blather with bespoke bot – but will it work?

richardcox13

> To be fair, there are a lot of facepalm questions, but I seldom encounter them.

Mostly because that 1% have already moderated them.

We lost another good one: Mathematician John Conway loses Game of Life, taken by coronavirus at 82

richardcox13

Apollo 13 set off into space 50 years ago today. An ignored change order ensured it did not make it to the Moon...

richardcox13

Re: Perrow

Looks like it now in primt... with a revised edition published in 1999. Also a Kindle edition is available.

NASA mulls restoring Saturn V to service as SLS delays and costs mount

richardcox13

Re: I actually believed it for a moment ...

> and they are BIG

"You may think it is a long way around to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to a Saturn V."

They are really really BIG! Until you want next to one you have no idea.

> The big problem

Also significant parts of the engineering drawings have been lost as well. So a re-start of the program would be a redesign pretty much from the ground up. The only advantage over the original program would be that it was known to work from the start.

But the biggest issue would be the kind of risks that were taken in the Apollo program are simply not accepted today.

Borky shark: A deserted airport and a Raspberry Pi feeling poorly at baggage claim. Welcome to 2020

richardcox13

"Merely an automatic system. Ancient computers ranged in the long caves deep ion the bowels of the planet tick away the dark millennia. I think they take the occasional pot shot to relieve the monotony."

('nuff said.)

UK's Ministry of Defence loads up £4.6m for one plucky IaaS and PaaS provider to host Oracle Primavera apps

richardcox13

Re: I remember the days ..

So do I.

But I also recall that was but a pale shadow of "real" project management systems that run on big systems. Perhaps consider the difference between notepad and a real text editor: if all you've ever seen is notepad then you don't know what you are missing.

Tech won't save you from lockdown disaster: How to manage family and free time while working from home

richardcox13

Re: Use fresh fruit and veg

This is why the "don't go out for shopping" in work day is a poor rule.

30-45min trip can be done while shops are quieter (and shelf fillers have a chance to get things there) with fewer people around. Add time on to the end (or start) of the day to compensate.

Thought you'd go online to buy better laptop for home working? Too bad, UK. So did everyone. Laptops, monitors and WLANs fly off shelves

richardcox13

Re: Loo Roll(ers)

My shopping run a few hours ago: there was some loo roll! It was going pretty much as quickly as it was brought out.to the shop floor.

Maybe the panic buyers have run out of space, and the rest of us can reach a normal level?

Captain Caveman rides to the rescue, solves a prickly PowerPoint problem with a magical solution

richardcox13

Re: Key workers

Government document

Says IT and telecommunications but with the caveat "their specific role is necessary for the continuation of this essential public service".

Microsoft Teams gets off to a wobbly start as the world and its cat starts working from home

richardcox13

Re: First I heard of it

Definitely a case of YMMV.

I could do everything except change notification settings...

Microsoft throws a bone to those unable to leave the past behind: .NET 5 support on the way for Visual Basic

richardcox13

Re: v5?

Answer is to avoid confusion with .NET Framework 4.x.

.NET 5 is the next update to .NET Core, but will drop the "Core" becoming the next version aimed to (eventually) fully replace .NET Framework.

(Framework does have the usual MS >10 years of support, so no rush to rewrite... yet.)

richardcox13
Boffin

F# FTW!

Amazon launches itself into retail IT with 'all the necessary technologies'. Not saying which, but you know...

richardcox13

Re: Under no circumstances

Big Brother Bezos is watching you and you will be assimilated.

FIFY.

How does Monzo keep 1,600 microservices spinning? Go, clean code, and a strong team

richardcox13

Re: You don't need to know how 1,600 services work

Exactly.

While each micro-service may be simple, all that has happened is the complexity has been pushed up to the interactions between those micro-services (to some form or orchestration layer).

Maybe that allows Monzo to, at least now, to more easily manage that complexity. Or maybe having a greenfield development has just avoided the legacy complexity because Moizo don't have that much IT history.

Only time will tell.

You've duked it out with OS/2 – but how to deal with these troublesome users? Nukem

richardcox13
Boffin

> Note: we'd recommend using something a little more... shreddy... if you want to completely wipe all data before passing on a hard disk.

While calling it NukeTheMBRIfYouAreReallyReallyReallySure.exe miight help avoid accidents this would have to be a DOS level program... and thus rather more limited file naming.

Let's Encrypt? Let's revoke 3 million HTTPS certificates on Wednesday, more like: Check code loop blunder strikes

richardcox13

Having read read some of the comment threads it seems revoking all potentially insecure certificates within 5 days of the discovery of the flaw is part of the Baseline Requirements agreed between CAs.

First MWC, then GDC, now Nvidia's GPU conference is online-only as coronavirus spreads in Silicon Valley

richardcox13

Re: "But we’ll do this all online"

Conferences are not really about the formal scheduled sessions. The real benefit is all the other communication and ad-hoc discussions.

That does not work online.

(However, in current circumstances, cancellations are a good idea.)

Google lives in an Orange submarine: Transatlantic cable will get by with a little help from some friends

richardcox13

Look: east-west privilege; other directions have just as much value!

You'll never select all and mark as read again after this tale of peril... Oh, who are we kidding? Of course you will

richardcox13

Re: NMR wiping.

> p.s., hydrochloric acid on your ATM card is also not very good for it.

One wonders what a HCl infected magnetic strip did to the readers...

Forgotten motherboard driver turns out to be perfect for slipping Windows ransomware past antivirus checks

richardcox13

Re: Driver Signing

> Can Microsoft not revoke the signature for the driver, or would that invalidate all Gigabyte drivers?

It would certainly block existing, otherwise working, drivers.

But there is another option with code signing, when the code was signed the timestamp itself should include a certificate that it is a valid timestamp for the then now. (This. in Windows, appears as a counter signature on the signature details.)

The code signing certificate can thus be invalidated from a given date by the issuing authority.

Code with a signed timestamp from before that point is still valid and passes its check. Code signed after that date, or without a signed timestamp does not.

NBD: A popular HTTP-fetching npm code library used by 48,000 other modules retires, no more updates coming

richardcox13

In the DOM, so on clients it is built in Fetch.

On server side (Node.js) not so much...

You want a Y2K crash? FINE! Here's a poorly computer

richardcox13

Re: Same as Audits

Yes.

MS Excel,... which copied Lotus 123

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