* Posts by silent_count

599 posts • joined 21 Nov 2011

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Switzerland 'first' country to roll out contact-tracing app using Apple-Google APIs to track coronavirus spread

silent_count

Re: Why do they keep repeating that ?

You are absolutely correct.

What you're missing is that governments have a massive hard-on for control. All of it. All of the time. The notion that you might not want to give them every conceivable bit of data is utterly foreign them. Whether they need it is not relevant.

Note that I didn't mention a particular party, or left or right or upside-down. That's because it does not matter. They're all the same.

Stripe is absolutely logging your mouse movements on websites' payment pages – for your own good, says CEO

silent_count

Long live NoScript

If anyone at El Reg fancies trying to get in touch with Mr Collison, ask him if he's comfortable with sending all of the data (the kind which Stripe collects from website users) from his and his staff's computers to me. I pinky promise it will only be for fraud prevention.

Tor Project loses a third of staff in coronavirus cuts: Unlucky 13 out as nonprofit hacks back to core ops

silent_count

Re: 13 staffers were 'let go'

The phrase always puts me in mind of the movies where the mobsters hang some poor guy off a balcony by his ankles. It's much the same in that it's not like the mobsters are graciously acquiesing to the guy's request to be 'let go'.

Microsoft boffin inadvertently highlights .NET image woes by running C# on Windows 3.11

silent_count

Re: "Visual Studio is a paid-for product"

@NerryTutkins

Microsoft is happy for you to spend your time and energy getting good at their environment/tools. And when you've made that investment, they want you to pay for the privilege of using their tools to produce software which helps Microsoft sell their OS. I can't speak for anyone else but that tastes a little bitter to me.

WebAssembly: Key to a high-performance web, or ideal for malware? Reg speaks to co-designer Andreas Rossberg

silent_count

Re: WaSm to you too

Thanks for the info but I don't trust either.

silent_count

WaSm to you too

Since the world finally buried Flash and it's weekly parade of vulnerabilities in an unmarked grave, I suspect team wASm will have an awfully hard time convincing the populous to adopt another, "hey let's download and execute arbitrary code off the interwebs so it can encrypt all my files till I send my year's pay in bitcoins to some complete bastard".

Apple tipped to go full wireless by 2021, and you're all still grumbling about a headphone jack

silent_count

Re: Waterproof?

That was my first thought too. No headphone jack or power cable plug would make a phone nearly waterproof by default. The catch would be the speaker and mic. To have decent sound in/out, you'd still need some holes in the shell. Unless, of course, apple displays some of their legendary, feature removing courage and starts selling phones which, not to put too fine a point on it, do not make phone calls.

WebAssembly gets nod from W3C and, most likely, an embrace from cryptojackers online

silent_count

Re: No! Do Not Want!

I think what's missing from this thread is the distinction between code running on your private machine and code on the internet which someone wants to run on other people's machines.

I don't care if the former kind is impenetrable but the later kind should, ideally be clear and legible. The caveat is that I do have some sympathy for those who want to minify JavaScript to lower their visitors' bandwidth usage.

In Rust We Trust: Stob gets behind the latest language craze

silent_count

Re: Do...While

Damn these kids who want to express the intent of the code by using different looping constructs. You will have JMP and you will like it! If you're really, really good Santa might bring you a JNZ for Christmas so you can do conditional branching without having to overwrite opcodes in memory.

Anyone who can not infer the intent of your code from what it does is clearly a lesser programmer, verging on subhuman, who does not deserve to bask in the splendour of your code.

Top American watchdog refuses to release infamous 2012 dossier into Google’s anti-competitive behavior

silent_count

Re: Meh

@doublelayer I would suggest that Google, Ford and Apple are identical in the sense that if you ask them for information, you will be told the answer that suits them, and which may not exactly align with your interests.

Speaking as someone who uses DuckDuckGo as my primary search engine and have at least tried Bing, I do not think Google has a search monopoly and Facebook will tell you that Google does not have an online advertising monopoly.

silent_count

Meh

Unless there's a realky good reason not to, the work of public officials should be available to the tax-payers. That said, I'm finding it hard to care. I have little doubt that Google did favour their own products and services. So what?

I also have little doubt that a Ford dealership would recommend using Ford parts and getting your car serviced by a Ford mechanic, regardless of what make or model you drive. I also suspect that your nearest iThingy store will tell you to only take your iThingy to an authorised iThingy repairer and only use them with other genuine iThingies.

Time to light torches and wave the pitchforks in a mildly threatening manner?

Q. Who's triumphantly slamming barn door shut after horse bolted at warp 9? A. NordVPN

silent_count

Re: Just out of curiousity....

Hi Marketing Hack,

If it's any help, I use AirVPN at work and NordVPN at home and haven't had issues with either.

I intend to stay with NordVPN for home use on the basis that they know they're one major screw-up away from not having a business. This gives them a great incentive to get their house in order, which it appears they're trying to do.

If you'd like a comparison list

https://torrentfreak.com/which-vpn-services-keep-you-anonymous-in-2019/

TalkTalk bollocked after fibre marketing emails found to be full of sh!t

silent_count

Re: ASA (After Stabledoor Ajar)

I think the best way to curb marketing bullshit is to make them actually walk the walk. This article mentions previous adds claiming that their routers signal "couldn't be beaten". Make them supply the best router on the market to their customers and upgrade it if someone makes a better version.

Yes, it would be prohibitively expensive. The word "prohibitively" is germane here. Being forced to make good on their claims will prohibit their marketing department from making nonsense claims in the future.

Facebook: Remember how we promised we weren’t tracking your location? Psych! Can't believe you fell for that

silent_count

Re: Samsung phones

Or course, Iglethal. You are absolutely right. But Ms Samsung PR rep can't say, "we choose to make awful design decisions which screw customers over because $$$". So I'm curious how they'd justify this particular strain of nonsense.

silent_count

Re: Samsung phones

I can understand why some software should not be removed. You don't want some user accidentally removing, for example, the phone dialer or the system settings software. Fine. I get that.

However, I'd dearly like someone from any of the major Android manufacturers to explain why Facebook, Twitter and similar nonsense should be "system" apps and thus not removable without rooting the phone.

Loss-making $15bn hipster chat biz Slack suddenly less appetising to investors as it predicts deeper losses

silent_count

Hookers and blow. The other $50 probably just gets wasted.

Trump attacks and appeals 'fundamentally misconceived' Twitter block decision

silent_count

Re: You can't have it both ways...

While I can't disagree with anything you've written, MJB7, I question the sanity of that line of reasoning. Theirs, by the way, not yours. Yours is clear and logical.

I imagine the same judges which want to be all gung-ho on the first amendment when it comes to people posting vitriol on the President's twitter feed would have strong objections to allowing those same people to exercise their free speech rights by wandering into a courtroom and spouting similar nonsense.

Maybe I'm wrong. I don't follow American politics that closely but what I suspect is that they've let their distaste for the President cloud their judgement, however well justified that distaste may be.

silent_count

Re: You can't have it both ways...

Joe W wrote: "It is not about twitter blocking people from their service, it is the account holder blocking people. Big distinction."

Just to be clear. Unless I'm misunderstanding, it's not that anyone is blocking people from posting on their own account, just from posting on President Trump's. Nor is it President Trump doing the blocking. It is Twitter. It's their platform. Being a private company, they can change their platform so other people can't be blocked from anyone's feed, rendering this whole argument moot.

silent_count

Re: You can't have it both ways...

ecofeco wrote: "The 1st Amendment expressly prohibits the suppression of free speech by the government.

Can you guess what the President of the United States is a part of? Go on! Take a wild guess!

There is no nuance here. It's as straightforward as it gets."

The first amendment you're referring to begins with, "Congress shall make no law..."

The president != congress and neither he nor Twitter are making a law about what people are allowed to say.

Let's say he gets his way and bans some people from posting on his twitter feed. Those same people are at their liberty to go out in the street and speak their mind, or post on facebook, or on TV, radio or even on their own twitter account.

silent_count

You can't have it both ways...

When the social media companies kick out nazis or commentators they don't like, they're not violating anyone's right to free speech because it's a privately owned platform.

When Twitter, on behalf of President Trump, wants to exclude people from a part of their platform, namely the comments on his account, it's a free speech problem because Twitter it's not a privately owned platform?

I realise it's a little more nuanced than I've stated it but there does seem like a contradiction at play.

Braking bad? Van with £112m worth of crystal meth in back hits cop car at police station

silent_count

It don't add up, guv

Is it possible that whoever came up with the $200 mil figure was, erm, 'testing' some of the product?

273kg being worth AU$200,000,000 works out to AU$733 per gram. That's roughly a week's wages for a low paid worker. For comparison, a cheap 24-pack of 375ml beer cans goes for $45 to $50. And gold is currently AU$65 per gram.

Was this meth laced with truffles? Each gram comes with a complimentary TV to watch while taking the meth? Is this stuff really that expensive?

Microsoft demos end-to-end voting verification system ElectionGuard, code will be on GitHub

silent_count
Mushroom

That could go very bad. There are already enough yanks who can't get their heads around the idea that Trump really got elected - it MUST have been the Russians who somehow brainwashed enough people to swing the election for him!

Could you imagine the spectacular hissy-fit they'd chuck if he got elected a second time? Evidence be damned! The voting app MUST have been hacked by the Russians. Or possibly the North Koreans. Or maybe both.

Your imminently sound suggestion for an easy-to-use voting app could well bring about WWIII.

Queen Elizabeth has a soggy bottom: No, the £3.1bn aircraft carrier, what the hell did you think we meant?

silent_count

Re: Aircraft?

I think I've spotted where you went wrong.

The only way those nice people would come to any harm is if the boat were an 'aircraft launcher', or possibly 'aircraft taker-offerer'. As the boat is an 'aircraft carrier' - see, it's right there in the name - there's no chance they'll come to any harm.

It's like people standing on the top of a car ferry. There's no danger they're going to get driven over by the cars.

Why are fervid Googlers making ad-blocker-breaking changes to Chrome? Because they created a monster – and are fighting to secure it

silent_count

Re: Ok, so it's useful and dangerous at the same time

No, it patiently does not solve the problem! Your suggestion would still allow the ungrateful peasants to circumvent the sole purpose of their existance. Namely, to sit passively and consume whatever messages their advertiser overlords deem appropriate after, of course, said overlords have paid their tithe to Google.

Oh. You were considering the problem from the perspective of the filthy peasants. Well done you! How forward-thinking. No, we don't give a damn about them and the so-called problems in their inconsequential lives.

Tech industry titans suddenly love internet privacy rules. Wanna know why? We'll tell you

silent_count

Re: re: Tech giants hate this...

@AC.

Of course Apple is in favour and it has nothing to do with altruism. It hurts the business model of their competitors.

Big Red's big pay gap: $13,000 gulf between male and female Oracle staffers – reports

silent_count

All else being equal...

If Jane and John have equal productivity but Jane's wage bill is $13k less, why would a company employ John? Whoever is bringing this lawsuit needs to explain why there are any male employees left who haven't been out-competed by their equally skilled but cheaper-to-employ sisters.

I have little love for Oracle but even less for nonsense lawsuits.

Guess who's back, back again? China's back, hacking your friends: Beijing targets American biz amid tech tariff tiff

silent_count

I wonder if the yank's zeal for protecting IP right extends to paying royalties to China every time they manufacture a bullet - which, funnily enough, contains gunpowder which was invented by...

Sure one could argue that the patient might have expired but guess which Disney-beholden national government keeps extending IP terms ever further towards the big bang.

Uncle Sam gives itself the right to shoot down any drone, anywhere, any time, any how

silent_count

Re: what exactly do they define as a "drone"?

I was wondering the same.

"You shot it down."

"Yeah. We're allowed to do that if the drone looks threatening."

"It was a 747 coming in to land."

"...in a THREATENING MANNER!"

"It had civilians aboard. We're only allowed to shoot down unmanned drones."

"I didn't see 'em."

The only good I can see coming of this is that Mr Travaglia is going to have a field day with this nonsense.

Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month

silent_count

Re: Java has been great as a teaching tool

I'll probably get laughed at but why not JavaScript?

- the syntax is C-ish.

- it's already installed on every device your students have.

- the browsers have some pretty decent dev tools built in.

- it's not dominated by one company (nobody is going to start demanding subscriptions or licenses to use JavaScript)

Facebook suspends account of Cambridge Analytica whistleblower

silent_count

Facebook will self-destruct in 3... 2.... 1...

“Protecting people’s information is at the heart of everything we do"

So when can we expect facebook to cease operating?

'Repeal hate crime laws for free speech' petition passes 14k signatures

silent_count

Re: My view

Hey AC, remember the yanks who said Obama shouldn't be president because he's not a US citizen? The problem was not in their ability to make the accusation but with their lack of evidence.

Incidentally a similar problem arises for you. Sure you can exercise your free speech to make the accusation against TimeMaster T but, in a world of free speech, there's nothing to stop me from asking what evidence you have to back your accusation.

Optus to refund NBN customers for slow connections

silent_count

Technology vs Advertising BS

This is not a technology problem or a NBN problem. This is a marketing bullshit problem.

Change the law so that if a telco advertises a given download/upload rate then they get fined $1 million for every single customer who does not get at least that rate 24/7. Bet'cha the day after that law passes we'll stop seeing advertisements for download speeds which are only ever seen by 0.00001% of the customers.

The Quantum of Firefox: Why is this one unlike any other Firefox?

silent_count

“Off topic, but I'm not sure why Firefox has lost so much ground to Chrome in recent years."

I am.

They spent a long time where every. damn. release. was another, "oh look! We've faffed around with the UI yet again for no apparent reason while completely ignoring the bugs & problems which have been with firefox forever". Just incidentally, every UI change was to make Firefox look more and more like Chrome. And quite a few people took the not unreasonable view that if they're going to use a browser which tries to be like Chrome, they might as well use Chrome.

Mozilla spent time and energy screwing around with a phone OS which was never going anywhere.

They found the time and energy to change the Mozilla logo. Did you care what their logo looks like? Did anyone?

The one time which they acted with any kind of decisiveness is when they got rid of Brenden Eich - they got rid of a guy with unquestionable technical competence to satisfy their political preferences. This was the final evidence, if any was needed, that making a good browser which people want to use is not something the people at Mozilla are interested in.

And I say this as a Firefox supporter. :/

Over a million Android users fooled by fake WhatsApp app in official Google Play Store

silent_count

Re: store fakes and junk

I commend to your attention 'Smart AudioBook Player'. The free version is good enough for my use but I bought the paid version to support the dev. (I have no interest in this software other than being a happy customer)

If you find anything good in the other categories you mentioned I'd be interested to see.

New SMB bug: How to crash Windows system with a 'link of death'

silent_count
Facepalm

If it compiles, ship it

"This mean that the new code base was simply not audited or fuzzed before shipping it on their latest operating systems."

Honestly now, is anyone surprised?

Clients say they'll take their money and run if service hacked – poll

silent_count

+1 Talk is cheap. A quick measure of the revealed preference would be to ask the same people when was the last time they changed providers in response to their previous provider's crap security.

#Censusfail Australia: Not an attack, data safe, no heads to roll

silent_count

Re: 260 forms per second?!?

"Note that Australia has a population of 24m."

We think the population is around 24mil but we don't know. Maybe there's been a population boom and all 2.4 billion Australians trying to connect to the ABS server at once is what caused it to fall over.

In any case, it should be a fairly easy problem to solve. We can count how many Australians there are by taking a cens.... oh.

Reverser laments crypto game protection, says wares dead after 2018

silent_count

Re: Will be interesting to see what happens...

Back when I had more time to play games, I used to make sure there was a working No-CD crack before I'd even consider buying a game (life's too short to spend it switching CDs for every damn program, just to pander to the publishers' paranoia).

So I'm not so sure, AC, that perfect DRM actually would increase sales, or whether there would be enough people like me who'd sooner find something else to spend their time on.

These days I buy off gog.com (all DRM free), or not at all.

The Register's entirely serious New Year's resolutions for 2016

silent_count

About bloody time!

Because I'm sick to death of these snooty science nerds banging on about how their 'evidence' stuff is more important than my opinion.

The Register's Australian technology headline predictions … for 2017!

silent_count

Initial DOCSIS 3.1 rollouts...

I read that as, "Inital DOS 3.1 rollouts". Now I'm left to ponder which of the two technologies would be more beneficial to the people of Oz.

Hollywood given two months to get real about the price of piracy

silent_count

Re: Reminds me of...

I actually agree with you, Danny 14, right up to your last line. I can't buy that the ICC acted in anything like good faith.

If the player called for chucking was in the third grade of the Zimbabwean domestic comp, the ICC would not have changed the rules.

silent_count

Reminds me of...

A cricket umpire named Darrell Hair. Mr Hair no-balled Muttiah Muralitharan for chucking. Rather than support Mr Hair, cricket's ruling body changed the rules so that Mr Muralitharan's bowling action was no-longer illegal.

Rather than applaud Justice Perram for being sensible, I'll bet the government will pass some law stating that the harm inflicted by every torrent download is equal to the GDP of the country where the movie was made.

Australia's smut-shocked senators seek net censorship (again)

silent_count

It seems a disturbing number of adults in Canberra spend their time thinking about children and pornography. Now those same deviates are brazenly trying to find an excuse to get paid to indulge in their favourite pass time - thinking about children and pornography.

Perhaps there should be some kind of national register so parents know who these people are, and some restrictions, maybe a 5km exclusion zone around every school, to keep those of their ilk away from our children.

Sued for using HTTPS: Big brands told to cough up in crypto patent fight

silent_count

How does the plaintiff know for sure what sort of encryption the defendant(s) use without decrypting traffic, which would be in violation of the DCMA?

VW's Audi suspends two engineers in air pollution cheatware probe

silent_count

So the follow-up question is whether those unspecified "senior managers" were work experience students or cleaning contractors.

£2.3m ZANO nano-drone crowdfunded project crashes and burns

silent_count

Re: KickShorter

Anti-failure insurance wouldn't be the worst idea.

KS could make it a requirement that everyone who wants a KS campaign has to pay $1k up front. That money would be used to pay someone to assess the viability of the campaign and determine how much it would cost for a potential backer to insure their pledge.

KS could make a modest fee from selling the insurance, and posting the price of the insurance on a campaign's page would give would-be backers a better feel for the likelihood of the campaign's success.

Most developers have never seen a successful project

silent_count

Re: Bollocks - Right stat wrong conclusion

"Bollocks"

From a guy described as 'an evangelist'. Nobody could have seen that coming.

FCC won't track Do Not Track

silent_count

Snowden said it best

"Let us speak no more of faith in man, but bind him down from mischief by the chains of cryptography."

Edward Snowden (paraphrasing Thomas Jefferson)

Disabuse yourselves of the notion that people who make money from tracking you are going to stop trying. Regardless of how many unenforceable laws or feel-good-but-useless protocols (hi there, DNT) are made, the only way they're going to stop is if you leave them no other option.

Block scripts and cookies (unless you absolutely need them for a given site) and browse through a VPN. Let's see how the, "We'll ignore DNT" crowd likes dem apples.

AMD sued: Number of Bulldozer cores in its chips is a lie, allegedly

silent_count

This guy could win.

So they're going to pull twelve regular people off the street and get them savvy enough about CPU architectures and designs to be able to make an informed ruling on this case. And then I'm going to flap my wings and fly to the moon.

This case does have a chance of being successful. Not because it has any merit but because the jury won't have a clue about who is telling the truth.

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