* Posts by Jaybus

401 posts • joined 21 Jan 2011

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'Robbery, economic plunder, victim of larcenous cronyism and a heist'

Jaybus

Re: Heads you win, tails I lose - perhaps landing on its edge is best then?

Do you really believe that the Chinese government, given access to all of the metadata gathered by TikTok, will choose to look only at inside leg measurements? What will they do with the rest of the data, sell it to GCHQ?

Jaybus

His idiot predecessor failed to act.

The Battle of Britain couldn't have been won without UK's homegrown tech innovations

Jaybus

Re: The war is over, the empire is gone

...you mean without having to fight SOME of them.

I can 'proceed without you', judge tells Julian Assange after courtroom outburst

Jaybus

Re: Blackmailed

You must be joking. Monsegur is taking the plea bargain, thus admitting his own guilt in the identity thefts. So you are of the opinion that the child is better off with the criminal father. Some might argue that the child would be better off if the criminal father were locked up, but you are entitled to your opinion.

Also, the FBI doesn't do the bargaining, the prosecution does.

Jaybus

Re: Blackmailed

And everyone has the right to legal representation, free legal representation if they haven't any money. A plea bargain must be reviewed and approved by a judge. So, no, I don't buy that so many defense attorneys fall for that on a daily basis.

Jaybus

Re: Blackmailed

"But if the Americans did do that, then plea bargains are legal in America and so information produced as a result of one wouldn't be inadmissible in evidence."

Yes. Plea bargains are legal in America. Keep in mind that plea bargains have to be reviewed and accepted by a judge. This is because it is actually a plea of guilty, the difference being that the judge is agreeing to the reduced sentencing proposed by the prosecutor in exchange for testimony. He cannot be compelled to testify against himself, but he can agree to do so. Does this make hist testimony less believable or more believable? That question is left up to the jurors.

Jaybus

Re: Blackmailed

And yet Manning's own defense claimed it to be a "gender identity disorder that may have affected Manning's judgement".

Be very afraid! British Army might scrap battle tanks for keyboard warriors – report

Jaybus

Re: Soldiers versus gunships

" Cyber weapons fall into this category, as less lethal ways of "blowing stuff up". "

I think you should add "Currently, " to the beginning of that sentence. Military leaders around the world would love to have robotic troops, and the industry will gladly produce them for the money. Very little reason to believe it won't happen as soon as technology permits.

Chinese State media uses new release of local Linux to troll Trump

Jaybus

Re: For whenever Source for the Goose is Sauce from the Gander

There are millions of Chinese Americans, so of course there are. Major newspapers in the US are World Journal, Sing Tao Jih Pao, Ming Pao, and The China Press. Also some politically slanted papers, International Daily News (pro-mainland), The Epoch Times (Falun Gong religious movement), and many more.

Linux kernel maintainers tear Paragon a new one after firm submits read-write NTFS driver in 27,000 lines of code

Jaybus

Re: Bit harsh

Well, there is already ntfs-3g, which is FUSE based. Why should they work on yet another? The problem with that is the huge performance hit, especially with lots of small writes, that is directly related to it using FUSE. A kernel driver for NTFS is not a ridiculous concept.

Oh, and btw, ntfs-3g has > 29k lines of code, so the existing FUSE-based FS is actually slightly larger than the proposed kernel driver. For comparison, ext4 has 29k and xfs has 65k. So wtf?

Bratty Uber throws tantrum, threatens to cut off California unless judge does what it says in driver labor rights row

Jaybus

Re: I am conflicted on this

Of course there are differences in legal obligation. For example, in the US an employer does not have to offer a retirement plan. But there is a caveat. If they DO offer a retirement plan, then they are legally obliged to offer it to all employees, not just those in the ivory tower. This is the same for the other things, health insurance, disability insurance, etc.

As a contractor, the driver is operating a business, independent from Uber. As you have pointed out, US law favors business. For example, tax deductions available to businesses are available to the drivers. I can certainly see why drivers would want to remain contractors. They make more money, or better to say they pay less taxes and so keep more of what they make. It's a fundamental difference in philosophy. The contractor is choosing to be self-reliant and manage his or her own money and affairs. The employee takes home less cash, offering up the remainder to the company and big brother with the expectation that they will manage it for his or her benefit.

Jaybus

Re: I’ll scweam and scweam and scweam until I’m sick!!

With one glaring exception. The sharecropper was bound to one landlord. In this case, the drivers can drive for both Uber, Lyft or with whichever digital landlord they so choose on a given day.

Jaybus

Re: I’ll scweam and scweam and scweam until I’m sick!!

That is also true in USA. A commercial driver license is required to drive anything for pay, the only exception being agricultural equipment. Also, the commercial insurance is required. I don't know if Uber informed their drivers or not, but I am sure the California magistrates know this. But they don't want to ban Uber, they want to tax them more. Most of the drivers, I am sure, want to remain contractors, because of the tax laws. They buy their own cars, fuel, and insurance, etc. As a business, these expenses are all deductible. As employees, the deductions for employee expenses are much more limited. So California will collect more taxes, from both Uber and the drivers, if the drivers are deemed employees.

This isn't about protecting workers. It is about collecting more tax revenue. Thankfully, it will be decided by the people and not left up to the government that stands to gain from making drivers employees against their will. If the people want to force Uber out, then so be it.

Super Cali COVID count is somewhat out of focus, server crash and expired cert makes numbers quite atrocious

Jaybus

Re: Certificates are becoming the new DNS?

" * Yes, there are people proposing that California secede from the United States. "

And many of those people live in other states.

NASA delays James Webb Space Telescope launch date by at least seven months

Jaybus

And they were able to fix Hubble in low Earth orbit with a space shuttle mission. Webb is going to L2. Granted, that is the best location for deep space observation, but is some 1.5 million km from Earth. Is a manned mission to L2 even feasible in the near future if something does go wrong post launch?

Privacy Shield binned after EU court rules transatlantic data protection arrangements 'inadequate'

Jaybus

Re: What is the "double standard"?

I believe the "double standard" that Eline Chivot was referring to is that Trans-Atlantic data transfers are being held to a different standard that Trans-Pacific data transfers, given that China's CSL specifically gives actual ownership of the data to the Chinese government.

If the Solar System's 'Planet Nine' is actually a small black hole, here's how we could detect it... wait, what?

Jaybus

Re: Five to ten EARTH masses

Yes we see the supernova, but that is also true for stars that become neutron stars. Btw, we have never imaged a neutron star either, just nearby gas clouds glowing from the x-ray emissions it produces. So seeing a supernova is not definitive evidence of the formation of an event horizon. We can only estimate that it will become a black hole based on the star's original mass. Had we a powerful enough telescope, looking into the center of the supernova remnant we should be able to see a neutron star (in x-ray). But for a black hole, we should see the remnant of the star collapsing at a slower and slower rate and getting more and more red shifted. From our observation point, (according to general relativity), time literally stops at the event horizon, meaning we can never see its formation from here.

Jaybus

Re: Five to ten EARTH masses

Wait. If watching from a distance, it seems we should never be able to see a star collapse into a black hole. Rather, we would see a star shrinking slower and slower toward its inevitable collapse, but never quite getting to the Schwarzschild radius due to relativistic time dilation. So how is it that we can see x-ray radiation from matter falling into the black hole when it still looks like a collapsing star that isn't quite yet a black hole from our point of observation?

After huffing and puffing for years, US senators unveil law to blow the encryption house down with police backdoors

Jaybus

Re: So once the Government gets its way....

While the red and blue do seem to be static in recent elections, they are not always a shoe in for one party or another. Stalwart red states Alabama and Tennessee voted for Democrats Johnson, Carter, and Clinton in my lifetime. New York voted for Reagan. California has only been blue since the 1992 Clinton election. These "exceptions" can be found for most all states. It is not nearly as cut and dried as you make it out to be.

Jaybus

Re: So once the Government gets its way....

The electoral college is not so strange. Each state has the same number of electors as they do members of Congress, 2 for their members of the Senate and one for each member of the House, which is based on population. Each state decides for itself how those electors are divided, although in all but two states it is a winner-takes-all. The purpose is to give all states a say in the election. In the beginning, it was to prevent Philadelphia, and so Pennsylvania, from choosing every president. Now it gives the so-called fly-over states a say in the election that they would not otherwise have. Bottom line, Clinton won the most individual votes, whereas Trump won the most voting districts. More individuals voted for Clinton. More communities voted for Trump. The president chosen notwithstanding, it is not such a bad system.

Jaybus

Re: RE; When strong crypto is outlawed

Actually, anyone could still have strong crypto, even in the unlikely event that it did become law. It's not like we can unlearn the maths, and existing open-source crypto is plenty strong enough for the near future. Just another bill that is doomed from the start because it is trying to legislate the impossible.

Splunk to junk masters and slaves once a committee figures out replacements

Jaybus

Re: When STONITH falls

Worse, how do they deal with the word f__k?

Jaybus

Re: @AC - When STONITH falls

"I was born an lived the half of my life in a country were statues were demolished hoping to erase the past. Twice."

As George Santayana pointed out, "Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it."

The incumbent President of the United States of America ran now-banned Facebook ads loaded with Nazi references

Jaybus

Re: Spoken like a true FOX news viewer

Please! the 88 thing is ridiculous conspiracy theory bs.

Facebook's cool with sharing the President's nonsense on its mega-platform – but don't you dare mention 'unionize' in its Workplace app

Jaybus

Such as the Parliament Square statue of Winston Churchill? Or do you mean for that to include churches, mosques, synagogues, sex toy shops, most women's clothing shops, and etc.? It's very complex. Perhaps we should just appoint you Minister of Propaganda to decide for us, similar to Joseph Goebbels' role in the 1930's. Wait! Churchill was instrumental in bringing down people like Goebbels, wasn't he?

Developers renew push to get rid of objectionable code terms to make 'the world a tiny bit more welcoming'

Jaybus

Re: BTW: How did that work out?

By contrast, had you a Neo-Nazi colleague who actively promoted racism, still he or she would not likely consider the master branch in git to be a racist term.

You know Facebook has an image problem when major nonprofits start turning down donations over political lies

Jaybus

"As for freedom of speech, a private company. They can choose who they host. They can choose to host the KKK but decide not to host a Martin Luther King Jr. Tribute page."

They do NOT have free reign to refuse hosting to whomever they choose. The Civil Rights Act prohibits discrimination by privately owned places of public accommodation on the basis of race, sex, religion, or national origin. Places of "public accommodation" include restaurants, hotels, banks, health clubs, and basically any service. It was enacted long before there was an Internet, but I'm fairly certain most judges would deem Facebook a place of public accommodation. In fact, FB deems itself an internet service and not a media company so that they don't fall under the media rules.

Made-up murder claims, threats to kill Twitter, rants about NSA spying – anything but mention 100,000 US virus deaths, right, Mr President?

Jaybus

Re: You supported a system...

I would say it is not the result of a district based system, but rather district-based combined with a first-past-the-poll voting system. It does favor a two-party system. For example, the USA is not a two-party system, otherwise. In fact, there were 13 minor parties that ran Presidential candidates in 2016. Most are either extreme left, extreme right, or totally special interest, but at least two, Libertarian Party and Green Party, ran candidates who received over a million votes each. The last to receive any substantial vote was the Reform Party candidate Ross Perot in the 1996 election (>8 million votes).

The barriers for a third party are high in a district-based first-past-the-poll voting system, but which two parties become dominant has indeed changed in the past in the UK and USA, so it is not completely impossible. The Labour Party came to power mainly due to the Liberal Party self-destructing, and something like that is certainly possible in the USA as well. Look at the factions that already exist in the major US parties.

Jaybus

Re: You supported a system...

Well, she barely won the popular vote, but OK. As for the "retarted" voting system, have a look at the 2016 US election results by voting district at https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/upshot/election-2016-voting-precinct-maps.html#3.46/39.71/-89.28. Clinton won the districts colored blue and Trump the red. There is far more red territory than blue, but because the blue is primarily the metro areas and the red everything else, Clinton won the popular vote. In other words, the electoral college system worked exactly as designed. It is a big country. Think of it this way; Clinton won the most people, while Trump won the most communities. The US is a democratic republic, not a democracy. And there is no monarch to just appoint a head of state with no vote at all. based on the predominant party.

Far-right leader walks free from court after conviction for refusing to hand his phone passcode over to police

Jaybus

Re: @elaar

"Often about as stupid and thought deficient as extreme right."

I have to disagree. That should be ALWAYS as stupid and thought deficient as extreme right, since there is no discernible difference in their actions, only in which group is targeted as the enemy.

Jaybus

Re: Would never have happened in my day

Yes, but the grounds for dismissal must be due to individual action, not due to association with one or another group. Dismissal due to association is, well.....1950's style McCarthyism in the US comes to mind.

That string of supercomputer hacks last week? Of course it was a crypto-coin-mining get-rich-quick scheme

Jaybus

Physicist Dr. Robert Helling at LMU Munich, one of the sites similarly attacked, published a preliminary analysis of the malware at https://atdotde.blogspot.com/2020/05/high-performance-hackers.html. He discovered altered files in /etc/fonts. In particular, the .fonts file was an executable with SUID root that simply gave a root shell (running bash). Another file in /etc/fonts named .low was larger and obfuscated by XORing. He was able to decode some of this and determine that it had lists of files in /var/log, presumably because it cleaned the logs. Also, they likely were able to steal additional SSH private keys from user directories, enabling them to login as many different legitimate users to further obscure the tracing.

Clearly, a sophisticated attack. Less clear is how they managed to implant the rootkit in /etc/fonts in the first place. Stealing a SSH private key from someone's personal device doesn't explain it. They could get a shell as a legitimate user, but still should not allow planting the rootkit in /etc/fonts. I wonder if their IPS only looks for remote password guessing attacks and not from sudo attempts.

In any case, it looks like they were able to delete logging and probably more, so the evidence of crypto mining, or anything else they did, is of course going to be limited. There is probably a gateway or router from which investigators could determine IP traffic, and that would reveal the extent of crypto mining.

Breaking virus lockdown rules, suing officials, threatening staff, raging on Twitter. Just Elon Musk things

Jaybus

Re: Same as the Nebraska meat packing plants

I can assure you that the people selling these horses at auction for meat production most certainly do not spend money on any drug. Any bute found in horse meat was from stolen horses. The real danger is in the failure to disclose the contents. I wonder what else is in there.

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Spacecraft with graphene sails powered by starlight and lasers

Jaybus

Re: Calling Isaac Newton...

Because if the perforations are smaller than 1/4 wavelength of the light striking it, the radiation pressure will be the same as if it were not perforated. This would reduce the mass needed to build a sail of the same dimensions, so would allow for a larger sail. Due to the divergence of the laser light, it would be important to make the sail as large as possible.

There's a black hole lurking within 1,000 light years of Earth – and you can see stars circling it with the naked eye

Jaybus

Re: No Planetary Nebula

I'm not sure that is possible. Due to time dilation, no object could ever be observed to cross the event horizon, so its age should not matter.

International space station connects 100Mbps symmetric space laser ethernet using Sony optical disc tech

Jaybus

Re: Nice technology

Difficult to jam laser comms. Typically, a CW laser diode is modulated by varying the current of its power supply. A modulation signal will be generated digitally and a DAC and amplifier will be used to drive the modulation of the current source. An optical notch filter allows a narrow range of wavelengths through to the detector. A high speed ADC directly converts the received signal to a digital signal, then a FPGA performs mixing and filtering mathematically. A QAM modulation scheme is typical. A sideband control channel would likely use a PSK modulation and could easily be used to switch carrier frequency at random.

A CW light source would show up as a DC offset, so a CW jamming signal would have to be intense enough to saturate the detector. Since the sun can't even do that, we can rule that one out. The jammer would need to know the precise wavelength and carrier frequency and would have to be able to decrypt the control signal to detect carrier frequency changes.

Facebook sort-of blocks anti-quarantine events – how many folks are actually behind these 'massive' protests online?

Jaybus

Re: Big rant, lots of capital letters...

There is also evidence that far more people have already been exposed than previously assumed. And all of the evidence is being questioned and debated in the scientific community with no definitive answers...yet. Bottom line: we don't really know yet which of the measures in place work better or if any of them even work at all. But we have many places on strict lockdown, some early, some late, as well as places like Sweden that took a very lax approach and now Georgia in the US that opted for a very short lockdown, and no doubt there will be all manner of different approaches before it is over. So there will be plenty of data on each approach and we will have a reasonable consensus in a year or two. For now, I will withhold judgement on Sweden and Georgia's more lax approach.

Also, we don't yet know how long previously infected people will maintain the SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, so we cannot know how long these people will remain immune. We don't even know what their level of immunity is. So, neither do we know if a vaccine can be effective. We do know that people infected with the similar SARS-CoV-1 virus maintained antibodies for years. Not proof that this will be true for SARS-CoV-2, but we can hope.

Star's rosette orbit around our supermassive black hole proves Einstein's Theory of General Relativity correct

Jaybus

Re: Wow

Well, if you consider that the heavy elements could only have been produced by supernovae explosions, then even the fissionable elements came from the energy of some star, albeit not the sun and the energy went in billions of years ago.

Jaybus

Re: Theory?

Since the incompleteness could very well be in the quantum theory, that is not very strong evidence that GR is either wrong or incomplete. On the other hand, it is known that QM does not predict that gold preferentially absorbs blue light due to the 5d-6s transition distance and so appears yellow, thus we have the field of relativistic quantum chemistry. And then there's gravity... No, I would think relativity has demonstrated more incompleteness in QM than vice versa.

Amazon assembles team of boffins, devs, project managers and more to figure out mass coronavirus testing

Jaybus

It is a complicated measure that seems more political than scientific. We can't be sure what he means by 'renewable energy'. You see, the state of California would consider very little of Norway's hydroelectric production to be 'renewable'. According to their self-designated Renewable Portfolio Standards, any plant with a capacity exceeding 30 MW is not considered a renewable source due to its impact on the ecology. Around 13% of California's electricity comes from hydroelectric plants that are not considered renewable.

Stop worrying – Larry Ellison and Prez Trump will have this whole coronavirus thing licked shortly with the power of data

Jaybus

Re: Salvation from Commentards

"If you get sick, go to the hospital, and eat a bag of M&Ms every day"

Not a very good comparison. Hydroxychloroquine has gone through rigorous clinical testing and has been approved for use in many places, just not for treating COVID-19. The M&M treatment could be compared with perhaps shark cartilage, but the asinine comment would be better if aspirin were used instead of M&Ms.

COBOL-coding volunteers sought as slammed mainframes slow New Jersey's coronavirus response

Jaybus

Also, it's not like the principles of what this code does have changed in the past few centuries. The old accounting and etc. COBOL code produces plain text output, albeit perhaps as EBCDIC text. Nevertheless it is very straight forward to create an app that calls upon the old code to do the heavy lifting and then translates the old EBCDIC text results to JSON and makes it available to the SaaS gobbling, web-based UI flavor du jour.

Recompile, move to a VM on modern hardware, install translator app, and voila! This old code is turned into "cloud" crap.

Australian digital-radio-for-railways Huawei project derailed by US trade sanctions against Chinese tech giant

Jaybus

Re: Uncle Sam's crackdown sparks....

Seems a bit melodramatic. Why scrap the new radio system altogether? I find it hard to believe Huawei is the only source of digital radio kit.

Remember that clinical trial, promoted by President Trump, of a possible COVID-19 cure? So, so, so many questions...

Jaybus

Re: Donald Jenius Trump

"The real problem starts when the idiot President announces....."

No. The real problem starts when researchers conspire with publishers for their own gain.

Soichi to join three-spaceship club, SpaceX is going to the Moon (no, really), and rocket boffins step up COVID-19 fight

Jaybus

If the lunar lander was not a spacecraft, then the Bell X-1, and all of the other drop launched vehicles, were not aircraft. They flew it from orbit, landed, then flew it back into orbit. Of course it was a spacecraft. As for the ISS, Mir, etc., they are not "flown" from point A to point B, so are space STATIONS for the same reason a floating dock is not a "seacraft". All just nomenclature, but the lunar lander was clearly a spacecraft.

White House turns to Big Tech to fix coronavirus blunders while classifying previous conversations

Jaybus

Re: Oh my goodness -- the US administration is thrashing?

By comparison, influenza related deaths range from 12,300 to 61,000 in the US (2010-2019), with known cases ranging from 9.3 to 45 million. But that is comparing real data (https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/burden/index.html) for influenza vs. total speculation for COVID-19. So apples - oranges.

Jaybus

Re: Oh my goodness -- the US administration is thrashing?

"There has been little testing, no isolation, and no tracing. "

That's just simply not true.

Alleged Vault 7 leaker trial finale: Want to know the CIA's password for its top-secret hacking tools? 123ABCdef

Jaybus

Re: "intensely embarrassed by the loss of some of its most valuable weapons"

Why, the flux capacitor, of course.

Jaybus

Re: Guilty? Possibly. Beyond a doubt? No Way!

"Has the CIA proved their case beyond a reasonable doubt? No."

I think I disagree with that assessment. Reasonable doubt is not about being 100% sure. There is no way to be 100% sure, which is why we have the concept of "reasonable doubt" in the first place.

Everyone seems to agree that he indeed used the KingJosh3000 ID, and there seems to be evidence that someone using that ID accessed the VM containing the code. Seems reasonable and even logical to accuse him. Is it possible that someone else who knew about the ID (whether they hated him or not) could have used it? Yes. Is there any evidence at all that someone else did so? No. Is there evidence that a co-worker hated him? Yes. Is there any evidence at all that one of those who hated him set him up? No.

The prosecution claims "We know that someone using the ID made an unauthorized access, and we have testimony that the defendant owned and used that ID." The defense rebuts with "Right, but everybody hated him. So, so, so, .... they framed him!" Seems beyond reasonable to me.

'I give fusion power a higher chance of succeeding than quantum computing' says the R in the RSA crypto-algorithm

Jaybus

Re: Glib rejoinder

"For absolute, unshakeable truth that cannot be pulled down, no matter the evidence, you need religion."

Not so. There are absolute truths in maths that cannot be refuted.

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