* Posts by jake

20022 posts • joined 7 Jun 2007

Page:

Updating in production, like a boss

jake Silver badge

Re: *wielded appropriately

Why would one pad perfectly good rebar with paper?

Besides, I maintain that a signed confession on a single post-it makes more impact than any number of clumsy clubs.

jake Silver badge

Re: *wielded appropriately

A non-Buddhist philosopher said to the Buddha, "I do not ask for words; I do not ask for non-words."

The Buddha just sat there.

The philosopher said admiringly, "The World-honored One, with his great mercy, has blown away the clouds of my illusion and enabled me to enter the Way."

And after making bows, he took his leave.

Then Ananda asked the Buddha, "What did he realize, to admire you so much?"

The World-honored One replied, "A horse runs even at the shadow of the whip."

jake Silver badge

Re: *wielded appropriately

Any buffoon can use a club.

It takes skill to know when and how to present a post-it for the most dramatic affect.

jake Silver badge

Re: Done it, learned from it

I suspect that's Reading, Kansas. US. Not E(CMWF).

jake Silver badge

As I tell people when I implement a belt & suspenders (belt & braces to you Brits) solution to avoid losing data during system migrations and the like, "I'm not quite paranoid yet .... but I'm getting there".

jake Silver badge

"Words are not enough. It has to be written."

Indeed. Back in my 9-5 career, I very much enjoyed thwacking manglement over their collective head with large piles of wet-ink paper-trail.

It's amazing how heavy a signed post-it can feel when wielded appropriately.

jake Silver badge

Re: I wish to write them in blood — your blood, to be precise.

Management has no blood.

jake Silver badge

But ...

... Excel is a perfectly good database! Why spend money on MS-SQL?

If you don't know what Poe's Law is, look it up before responding. Ta.

Do you want to become a vulture? Now's your chance to join The Register's news desk

jake Silver badge

Re: Nope...

Yeah, the Reg Hacks are lightweights, aren't they.

jake Silver badge

Re: Tempting

It's all RaNsoMe NoTe to me ...

jake Silver badge

Re: Not a vuture ...

A "vuture" is vapo(u)rware as sold by high-end VR goggle startups.

It'll work RealSoonNow[tm], honest!

jake Silver badge

Re: Tempting

I always thought it was

*emphasis*

/emphasis/

_emphasis_

with most authorities recommending not bothering for the most part.

When I was learning to set hot lead, my teacher recommended not using italics, bold or underline unless I had a damn good reason to do so[0]. English, when written properly, has no real need for such crutches (or so she claimed).

[0] Meaning unless somebody was paying me to produce it.

How hot is it right now? 'Water park catching fire and burning down' hot

jake Silver badge

The lowest flash point at a waterpark is at the bottom of the slide(s).

jake Silver badge

Re: Doubts

Faulty and/or corroded wiring would be my guess.

In some parts of the country it might be a homeless folks campfire that got out of control, but Vernon is in that "one hour drive from Manhatten" zone that only allows rich people to exist within it.

jake Silver badge

Re: Rebrand

Why make life miserable for the crocodiles? They didn't do anything to you ... NJ would only be comfy for crocs about 3-4 months out of the year.

"Garden State" my pasty white Californian butt ...

jake Silver badge

Re: Follow up?

The regulations and frequency of inspections depends on the jurisdiction. This kind of thing is not a Federal issue, rather it is handled at the State level. If you are worried about it happening while you are there, do your due diligence before spending vacation money in any given State.

Note that this one happened when the park was not open for business. I rather suspect a plastic (fiberglass) waterslide wouldn't be very easy to burn down if it was in operation, with water running through it.

jake Silver badge
jake Silver badge

"The Garden State was home to (Class) Action Park"

I think a little research will show that Action Water Park is the old name of Mountain Creek Water Park. Twice.

Deluded medics fail to show Ohio lawmakers that COVID vaccines magnetise patients

jake Silver badge

Re: Struck off?

"Except they weren't persecuted in England."

In fact, many of them returned to England from the colonies. It cracks me up every time you Brits claim the US was founded by the Puritans. In reality, the Puritans were a fairly unimportant sub-culture by 1776. If you look at facts, not a single one of our Founding Fathers was a Puritan. In fact, many of them spoke out against organized religion partially because of the Puritans ... If anything, the American Revolution happened in part to rid ourselves of such bullshit (sadly, we're not done yet).

On the other hand, and apropos of ElReg's science oriented crowd, seven of the ten initial core group that became The Royal Society were Puritans. The Puritans never ran the United States, but they DID run England for many years. The effects are still visible.

jake Silver badge

Worse.

They'll chew through soft tissue to get to each other. I've seen the results in a puppy, who apparently swallowed three of the things a few hours apart (how is anybody's guess). Fortunately the Vet was on the ball and figured it out quickly. The critter survived the peritonitis, and is happily running around three years later, sans several inches of intestine. If the owner had waited even 12 hours before bringing in the pup, the end result wouldn't have been quite as happy.

US Air Force announces plan to assassinate molluscs with hypersonic missile

jake Silver badge

That was a pearl of a comment.

I had to type that three times, the ol' fingers kept saying perl ...

jake Silver badge

One word:

Chowder.

What's that hurtling down the Bifröst? Node-based network fun with Yggdrasil 0.4

jake Silver badge

Re: One wonders ...

It's all in the context. The landsharks could claim that Adam was selling a networking solution under that name (which is true), and thus they are infringing on his trademark.

jake Silver badge

Re: What's with the Ös?

Sometimes called "röck döts". First used in the popular music world by the Krautrock band "Amon Düül II" in 1969 ... In 1970, at roughly the same time, Blue Öyster Cult named itself, and Black Sabbath released a single[1] variation of the song "Paranoid" renamed "Paranoïd", leading into what has become known today as "the Metal unlaut".

God, I'm getting old ...

[1] For the kiddies in the audience, a "single" was a form of analog RAM, a disc roughly 7" across, made of vinyl, (usually) spinning at 45 RPM, (usually) featuring one song per side. The music was recorded as a continuous spiral grove, called a track, which was followed by a needle that transformed bumps in the track into an electrical signal, which when amplified and sent to speaker(s) produced the sound that kids called "music" and parents called "noise".

jake Silver badge

One wonders ...

... what Adam Richter's lawyers have to say about using that name in this context.

Windows 11: Meet the new OS, same as the old OS (or close enough)

jake Silver badge

Re: What is an OS for?

"All these posts and nobody tries to answer the original question."

That's because the original poster answered his own question.

I suspect it was mostly rhetorical anyway ... I'm fairly certain that all but a very small handful of El Reg readers know what an OS is.

jake Silver badge

Re: What is an OS for?

The systemd-cancer is just one init of many. There are other options, as is well documented here and elsewhere. If you don't want the cancer inflicted on you, don't use it.. Simples.

Here's the same link in plain-text for those who prefer it:

https://distrowatch.com/search.php?ostype=All&category=All&origin=All&basedon=All&notbasedon=None&desktop=All&architecture=All&package=All&rolling=All&isosize=All&netinstall=All&language=All&defaultinit=Not+systemd&status=Active#simple

jake Silver badge

Re: What is an OS for?

Win2K was peak Microsoft. It has all been downhill from there.

Systemd 249 release candidate includes better support for immutable OSes and provisioning images

jake Silver badge
Pint

Re: Thinks I like about systemd

To be fair, surviving a reboot and surviving a reinstall are two completely different things.

Any system should survive even a random reboot with all user data intact (except stuff in RAM being worked on that hasn't been saved, of course). Systems that do not are b0rken, by definition.

Before doing a reinstall, save a copy of all important everything. In fact, it is best if one assumes that the installation routine will assume it has a blank disk to work with, and act accordingly. EVEN ESPECIALLY if the vendor claims otherwise.

On the other hand, we all have all our important data properly backed up, right?

In the gripping hand, beer. Sometimes it's a useful portion of the answer.

jake Silver badge

"And they were totally pissed off by being able to develop and de-bug a start-up script in the shelll - including stepping through it if necessary - and then just drop it into /etc/init.d."

Because shell scripting is so very, very difficult. So we'll write an entirely new interface, and do away with all that nasty text stuff (except where we don't). In fact, text files are so very, very difficult that we'll even make the logs binary and invent more new tools to deal with them! Never mind that it's not compatible with anything else in the entire system, it is obviously much easier this way. So easy, in fact, that we'll re-write as many other things that we can think of, no matter how peripherally involved with an init, just to make the entire system as big as possible. What could possibly go wrong?

One wonders what the authors of the systemd-cancer are smoking.

jake Silver badge

Re: Thinks I like about systemd

"FYI per the spec, /tmp is specifically for stuff that might not survive a reboot and /var/tmp is for stuff that should survive a reboot."

It's not a specification, it's a recommendation, and it goes on to further state that it is up to the cognizant systems administrator to make the choice system to system.

jake Silver badge

Re: Thinks I like about systemd

No.

jake Silver badge

Re: Thinks I like about systemd

"In Unix you understand the files and thier format rather than apis."

You are not even wrong.

jake Silver badge

Re: Thinks I like about systemd @Def

Sounds to me like you and your company are into self-flagelation.

Not that there's anything wrong with that, of course. Enjoy.

Just don't ask me to join in. I'm not fond of that kind of pain.

jake Silver badge

Re: Thinks I like about systemd

"I write real software, not text parsers."

Interesting. A so-called developer who doesn't think compilers are "real software".

Presumably it also doesn't think much of interpreted languages.

One wonders how efficient it is without scripting.

jake Silver badge

Re: Thinks I like about systemd

To a reasonable approximation, everything is a file parser.

Not all files are text.

All log files ought to be, though. Anything else is an abomination.

Except database logs, of course, but that's a whole 'nuther kettle of worms.

jake Silver badge

Re: Thinks I like about systemd

Or elvis. Or whichever version of vi floats your boat. I usually have several versions installed, "just in case".

jake Silver badge

Re: Thinks I like about systemd

"Systemd owns everything so obviously it can delete whatever it likes."

Only if you're stupid enough to allow it on your system.

What job title would YOU want carved on your gravestone? 'Beloved father, Slayer of Dragons, Register of Domains'

jake Silver badge

Re: Headphones

"after seeing the ad in some sci/tech publication"

Most likely a JS&A ad in OMNI Magazine.

I have a working Bone Fone. I recently rescued it from a box in my parent's attic (along with a pair of roller skates and a pile of Campagnolo bike parts I collected to modernize my early '70s PX-10E). It is OK for listening to baseball, the news or talk shows, but that's about it.

Stob treks back across the decades to review the greatest TV sci-fi in the light of recent experience

jake Silver badge

Re: Always worth waiting for

When a story gets derivative of itself, it's time to fire the writer(s).

jake Silver badge

Re: Always worth waiting for

That's because it is a good thing.

jake Silver badge

It doesn't know the words.

jake Silver badge

Dr. Dobbs Journal is the only early computer rag that I have kept a complete collection of in dead tree form.

jake Silver badge

Re: "always bearing hard left"

To be fair, SciFi isn't supposed to be a detailed survey of an existing society living on an existing planet. Rather, it's supposed to be entertainment. Escapism.

For example, take Star Trek IV ... while I've encountered a few whales when sailing on San Francisco Bay, and I've certainly encountered a lot of very snotty weather ("If you learn to sail on San Francisco Bay, you can sail anywhere."[0]), I've never in my entire life seen that kind of huge ocean waves on the Bay. It just doesn't happen that way.

To say nothing of "the Cetacean Institute" being filmed at Monterey Bay Aquarium, a well-known landmark that is nowhere near Marin County. Watching them cross the Golden Gate Bridge to get to Monterey from SF was somewhat jarring to us locals.

We won't discuss using the non-nuclear USS Ranger as a stand-in for the nuclear powered USS Enterprise.

Etc.

Most suspended disbelief and enjoyed The Voyage Home anyway.

[0] "If you learn Ubuntu, you'll understand Ubuntu. If you learn Slackware, you'll understand *nix."

Racist malware blocks The Pirate Bay by tampering with victims' Windows hosts file

jake Silver badge

Re: Eh?

Ok, Mr. Pedantic ...

We are not blocking anything because a third party has asked us to block it, under duress or otherwise. The ONLY things we block are either asked for by our users, or places that allow abuse of the network.

My own ISP, est. 1982[0], has been asked by a couple of state and local agencies (and a couple of Universities) to block specific things over the years. I told 'em to fuck off each time. They stopped asking about 20 years ago. I have never been approached by an agency of the US Government, nor any foreign agency.

All ISPs are in the San Francisco Bay Area, since you mentioned jurisdiction.

[0] A tick over 10,000 active users at the moment, about 7,000 use the system daily, the rest check their email and/or monitor some world and local Usenet groups at least once per week or thereabouts. I provide DNS to those who want it. Around 25,000 inactive users. Users live word-wide. My services are free to them ... the system is a test-bed that is mostly a tax write-off.

jake Silver badge

Eh?

I have a hand in running several ISPs (including three that still sell shell accounts).

We are not being paid to block anything.

jake Silver badge

Re: Misfiled article

Of course it's science ... Anthropology, to be specific.

jake Silver badge

Re: Hard as it may be to believe ...

I'm not defending anything.

Re-read what I said, not what you want me to have said.

jake Silver badge

Where did anyone say there is no such thing?

Methinks your parser is b0rken.

jake Silver badge

Hard as it may be to believe ...

... intent to shock and offend is not necessarily racist, regardless of the language used.

Page:

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY TECH NEWSLETTER

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2021