* Posts by jake

26662 publicly visible posts • joined 7 Jun 2007

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OpenBSD 7.5 locks down with improved disk encryption support and syscall limitations

jake Silver badge

BSD started life at University of California Berkeley, as patches and additional tools for Bell Labs Research UNIX V6. Some of these changes found their way back to Bell Labs and were rolled into V7, and some of V7 went into later BSD. BSD and UNIX swapped code back and forth for several generations, until AT&T's lawyers noticed that UNIX was worth some money, at which point the BSD source was eventually sanitized, with all AT&T code rewritten from scratch by around the 4.3BSDs. This lead to the versions known as 4.3BSDTahoe... and Net/1. Then 4.3BSDReno and NET/2. NET/2 led led to the late, lamented 386BSD and then on to all the BSDs we have today, which at least to some degree continue the code swapping tradition.

By way of reference, the UNIX Wars occurred roughly between "lawyers" and "386BSD" in the above paragraph, with a small (probably ongoing) footnote from an upstart company with an assumed (purchased) name, known as SCO, happening later.

Also note that several other large companies (most notably Sun Microsystems, IBM and NeXT) and many Universities world-wide contributed to the early BSD work.

That's the tl;dr version, the details would fill a small book. It's a convoluted history.

So in a C shell, while BSD is no longer a genetic UNIX (as of the late '80s/early 90s), it is a spiritual UNIX, regardless of what the lawyers have to say.

jake Silver badge

Re: XKCD 538.

If you're using it as a club instead of as an actual wrench, head for Harbor Freight[0] for this 18+ inch beauty at a bank-busting $8.99:

https://www.harborfreight.com/hand-tools/wrenches/hitch-ball-wrench-95494.html

Or perhaps this one, which makes up in mass for its lack of length ... 8 inches of solid steel for only $3.99:

https://www.harborfreight.com/hand-tools/wrenches/pipe-wrenches/8-inch-steel-pipe-wrench-39641.html

Or perhaps you'd prefer its big brother, the 10 inch model at only $5.49:

https://www.harborfreight.com/hand-tools/wrenches/pipe-wrenches/10-inch-steel-pipe-wrench-39642.html

You're on your own for the lead pipe. Perhaps head to Florida? It'll probably come as no surprise to anyone reading here that Florida leads the nation in lead water pipes ...

[0] Note: That's the name of the place, and so there is no need for my usual "harbo(u)r".

jake Silver badge
Pint

Re: I love OpenBSD

To be fair, I too have some highly personal, quite idiosyncratic, some might say very eccentric, non-standard test boxen.

I would EXPECT to run into problems installing a fourth (fifth ... ) OS on any one of them.

That's why I always check out new OSes or distros on a fairly generic, freshly wiped, bare metal machine. Gives them a level playing field.

Nice review, as usual. It's Friday. Have a beer.

GCC 14 dropping IA64 support is final nail in the coffin for Itanium architecture

jake Silver badge

Re: "celebrated industry diplomat Linus Torvalds"

Frankly, I'm surprised that Linus has been as tolerant as he has all these years ... If it was my name attached to the project, I'd have really lit into a few of the fucking idiotic prima donna drama queens.

jake Silver badge

Credit where credit is due.

"Itanic, as The Reg dubbed it."

Seems it wasn't ElReg who came up with the nickname, it was ElReg reader Andrew N. See this article, from the days before paragraphs and commentards were invented:

https://www.theregister.com/1999/10/28/amd_vs_intel_our_readers/

Hint: It's in the final line.

Space Force boss warns 'the US will lose' without help from Musk and Bezos

jake Silver badge

I guess it's a plan. Kinda. Sorta. If you squint.

Bankrupt the Chinese with an unwinnable technology race, just like the West bankrupt the Russians starting in the 50s and running through the 70s and well into the 80s.

Note that the Russians still haven't fully recovered, and thus will not be a major player in the game this time around ... the only questions remaining are whether or not the Chinese are stupid enough to fall for it, and whether or not the US has the intestinal fortitude to spend the ungawdly amount of money it will cost.

What can be done to protect open source devs from next xz backdoor drama?

jake Silver badge

Re: PID 0 is owned by the kernel

You didn't ask me an original question. I simply pointed out that a point you made was incorrect, with a little background should anyone be interested in what is, to be fair, a rather esoteric subject. And then, instead of acknowledging that you made a mistake, as any sensible chimpanzee would do, you waffled along at random, trying to make yourself look intelligent.

You failed. Miserably.

Do you have any more words of wisdom with which to attempt to impress the crowd?

jake Silver badge

Re: PID 0 is owned by the kernel

"And what does “ps -fp0” tell you?"

That ps uses the proc filesystem, which doesn't have permission to display details about PID 0.

jake Silver badge

Re: PID 0 is owned by the kernel

I think you'll find that ps -eaf will show you that the PPID (Parent Process ID) of both init and kthreadd is 0.

jake Silver badge

Re: I was think about the assumption in earlier versions that computers start counting from 1.

"Linux PIDs, for example, start from 1, there being no PID 0."

PID 0 is owned by the kernel, specifically the process that keeps an eye on memory.

Traditionally, the init was the next process called during boot, so it defaulted to PID 1 .... later, as the kernel grew more complex and had to call a few other processes that required PIDs, technically the init might have received PID 2, 3 or 4 (or whatever), and indeed I worked on early systems that did this. Thankfully, in order to preserve sanity within the system, wise heads decided to reserve PID 1 for the init.

The Linux kernel has it's own initialization process, what we think of as "init" is just there to set the system up for humans. One can change the "init" called by the kernel as PID1 to whatever you like at the kernel command line, using init=/path/to/valid/program as a kernel boot parameter. Try using bash. The more adventurous among us might try EMACS or vi instead of bash.

Techie saved the day and was then criticized for the fix

jake Silver badge

Re: I have done the air-con shuffle in the past!

"Also known as 0.526mm."

The AC sociopath was discussing inches, so I replied in kind ... but that's 0.52595812836mm, if you want to go that route.

In more proper ElReg units that would be 0.0038 linguine.

jake Silver badge

Re: Locks.

"I wonder why?"

Gut feeling? Projection combined with the Peter Principal.

Individual Scouts and their local leaders are usually upstanding members of a local community, but the further up in the hierarchy you go the more detached from reality they become. As with any such organization, there are exceptions to the rule.

jake Silver badge

Re: I have done the air-con shuffle in the past!

"and 362/17482 inches is just sociopathic."

Hyperbole much? I'm fairly certain that in the whole of human history, the only sociopath who has suggested that 0.0207070129276 inches would be a useful measurement is yourself.

jake Silver badge

Re: If you have a secure server room

I've seen individually alarmed cabinets. After the first few false alarms they always seem to accidentally become disabled.

jake Silver badge

Re: Locks, only one way to do it right

Similarly equipped file cabinets also exist.

Both are extremely expensive, though.

jake Silver badge

Re: Locks.

Neither the Dremel nor the sledge hammer are lock picking tools. They are lock destroying tools.

Similar to the difference between hacking and cracking.

jake Silver badge

Re: Locks.

Probably an appropriate place for this comment ... Never use grease or oil to lubricate a lock. It picks up dust and turns into grinding compound and/or eventually jams the lock with accumulated crud. Instead, lubricate with a tiny bit of graphite, but only if absolutely necessary.

jake Silver badge

Re: Locks.

Presumably you are prepared to show us all at least several places where I've claimed to be anyone other than myself.

::crickets::

Even one? No? Not even one? What's that make your comment, Mr. Daglish?

jake Silver badge

Re: Sounds About Right

They make locks which are direct replacements that are difficult for neophyte pickers to bypass (proper fitting disc tumblers, for example (I think the LPL calls them disc detainers)). They usually cost a couple dollars more than the stock ones, though, and what manager will pay for that?

jake Silver badge

Re: Mess with locks = big nope

Of course. Always follow policy and procedure.

But if you know how, let the Boss know you can pick the lock(s) and minimize damage (costs). Make certain you get a wet signature authorizing it before making the attempt, though..

jake Silver badge

Re: Floor loading, what is that

Again, it depends on the style of floor.

Consider, for example, that I'm in earthquake country.

jake Silver badge

Re: Locks.

No badge for that here in the US. Several years ago, one of my nephews tried to convince the BSA to let him write a new locksmithing merit badge. They flat turned him down ,,, and threatened to throw him out if he let on to his buddies that he knew how. When I pointed out that their Automotive Maintenance merit badge would give a scout the ability to hotwire a car, I thought they'd have a collective coronary ... and I was asked to leave. The automotive badge requirements have since been dumbed down.

The world is filled with namby-pamby hand-wringers. Sad, that.

jake Silver badge

Re: Locks.

Actually, locks don't keep honest people out, either.

However, honest people don't do anything illegal with their knowledge and ability.

jake Silver badge

Re: Locks.

No, I'm not the LPL.

jake Silver badge

Re: Floor loading, what is that

Depends on the style of floor. I've driven an F250 onto a raised floor with over half the tiles lifted, loaded the truck with equipment, and driven it out again. Several times (we were moving the DC a couple blocks to the East).

I would not recommend doing this unless you know for a fact that it is safe, though ...

jake Silver badge

Locks.

1) Don't pry the silly little things open. Rather, learn to pick them. Equipment cabinet locks, desk drawer locks, file cabinet locks and the like are among the easiest locks to learn on. Making picks is easy, instructions can be found online. All you need is a few tines from a street sweeper and a Dremel. Or, if you live in an enlightened country you can buy kits of assorted picks and turning tools for very little money. Try Covert Instruments for a good selection of quality tools. Lock picking is a useful skill, and not all that difficult to learn. Recommended.

2) Those equipment cabinet locks are usually fairly generic, and OEM parts were probably available if you knew where to look. In fact, I'll bet a wooden nickle that they are still available. Call your nearest locksmith, or just look em up online. Both Grainger and McMaster-Carr sell a wide variety at reasonable prices. Also recommended.

German state ditches Windows, Microsoft Office for Linux and LibreOffice

jake Silver badge

Re: those wiith nimble brains and aptitude

Could you contemplate addressing the topic instead of embarrassing yourself by descending to argumentum ad hominem?

jake Silver badge

Re: Unix printing

Linux printing problems pretty much went away twenty+ years ago.

jake Silver badge

Re: making the use of libre office mandatory

It's not Excel that they will bitch about, it's Power Point.

My solution as a consultant is to fire anyone who claims to depend on Power Point. To date (for the last quarter century or so), this admittedly draconian solution has never failed to improve morale, increase profits and otherwise streamline the corporation.

jake Silver badge

Re: Maybe just give Linux and open-source apps to those wiith nimble brains and aptitude

This old codger has been contributing to Linux for over thirty years, and to BSD before it was called BSD.

Without us old codgers, you youngsters would be stuck with Redmond and Cupertino.

jake Silver badge

Re: It wont be technical issues which sink this

"in this case they would have to train millions of staff (many of whom have much more important things to be doing) in new systems.'

Just like they do every time Microsoft rolls a major rev? At least with Linux, the retraining only has to happen once for general use (applications are another kettle o'worms).

Tech titans assemble to decide which jobs AI should cut first

jake Silver badge

Which jobs go to AI first?

Obviously, the ones that AI would be good at. Today, that would be the ones that are filled with bullshitting, hallucinatory, congenital liars.

That's all of middle-management, and everybody who thinks power point is important.

Sounds good to me. When do we start?

Turns out AI chatbots are way more persuasive than humans

jake Silver badge

Re: Upshot of the TikTok generations

To be fair, I did specify "educated". Not everybody attending further education avails themselves of it.

jake Silver badge

Re: FT even more FY

User: ::blocks Chatbot's IP address::

Chatbot (changing IP address): Hi, it looks like you are interested in buying _widget_ today.

User: ::blocks Chatbot's IP address block::

Chatbot (changing IP address block): Hi, it looks like you are interested in buying _widget_ today.

User: ::blocks all of alphagoo and waits::

::crickets::

User: ::shares alphagoo's entire address range with friends and family and anybody else interested::

jake Silver badge

Re: There is an opportunity here for a competition

In 1972, "The Doctor", at BBN (tenex?) and PARRY (at SAIL) had a conversation during the first ICCC ... Well, they had a conversation that was followed over the ARPANET during the ICCC. It was immortalized in RFC 439. Both 'bots were instances of ELIZA. Read it for yourself here:

https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc439

It would seem that not much has really changed in the last half century (right, amfM?).

Of course back in 1972 we weren't stupid enough to take and act on a machine's advice ...

jake Silver badge

Re: Upshot of the TikTok generations

My grand daughter (13 years old) doesn't use so-called "social" media, because in her words, "It's stupid!".

Likewise her mom and dad, her grand parents (both sides), her great grandparents (three of them still living), and one surviving great great grandparent.

From my perspective it's not a generational thing.

Advertising at college educated people doesn't work. In general, it just pisses them off. They don't like being lied to, having their time wasted, and generally having their intelligence insulted.

jake Silver badge

Re: Meh

Word 2, hopefully. After that it became extremely unwieldy.

jake Silver badge

Re: Meh

It's EMACS vs. vi, as any fule kno.

jake Silver badge

Re: It will be sudden, but this Ai fad will pass

Actually, it'll be when the investors notice that the marketards have been crying WOLF! incessantly for a few years with nothing to show for it. Then, and only then, will another AI Winter be upon us. Personally, I think the process started a couple years ago, but what with everyone sitting at home playing with themselves (because Covid), nobody noticed.

Rust developers at Google are twice as productive as C++ teams

jake Silver badge

Re: Basics done right and geek's superiority syndrome

"I can tell you there are plenty of folks who presume to be able to program a computer without even knowing what a register is."

I have interviewed kids right out of Uni who don't understand what the heap and stack are, much less how to use them, much less how the compiler sees them, and why.

jake Silver badge

Re: Valgrind, Purify, BoundsChecker

"rumtime memory checkers"

4.) It's always 5 o'clock somewhere.

Why Microsoft's Copilot will only kinda run locally on AI PCs for now

jake Silver badge

Re: Now wait a minute

"But.. but.. I paid for the Pro version!"

As it's clearly unfit for the stated/advertised purpose, demand your money back.

"Alternatively, this is my games/dirty box"

If you need games, stick with the toy OS if you like. You can surf pR0n anonymously on any OS; a VPN can help with that.

::shrugs::

What do you mean "That's not what I meant by dirty!"?

jake Silver badge

Re: Now wait a minute

"You must update."

So update. I recommend formatting the drive and installing a professional OS instead of the toy that is Windows.

Easy-to-use make-me-root exploit lands for recent Linux kernels. Get patching

jake Silver badge

Re: If you are *already* in such a sad state ...

Not sure if you are bragging, in need of a decorator, or looking for an exterminator ... regardless, I'd recommend asking somebody else, it's obviously their problem.

There is a woman in Petaluma who breeds miniature horses. She thinks it's "fun" to bring them into the house. I suppose it might be ... if you think it's "fun" cleaning carpets and trying to get horse urine out of hardwood floors. Not recommended.

jake Silver badge

Re: Bleeping Computer

Jesus wasn't crucified,t he other guy was. Read your bible, it's all in there in black and white.

If you read the gospels for content, you'll discover that Pontius Pilate didn't want to crucify Jesus. You'll also discover that Jesus was imprisoned with a murderer that Pilate wanted to put to death. The murderer's name? Barabbas. What does Bar Abba mean in Aramaic? In English, it means "Son of The Father".

Now, nobody was allowed to speak the name of God (except the High Priest, on the Day Of Atonement) ... Instead, they called God "The Father" in day-to-day life. So when Pilate asked both men their names (Roughly, "Are you the Son of the Father?"), they would have replied in the affirmative. Throw into the mix the Essenes, well known for causing mini-riots, chanting "crucify him!" for the OTHER Barabbas, and you have a logical explanation for the "risen from the dead" myth.

This would also explain why the supposedly "dead" Jesus was seen walking BACK to the tomb by Mary of Magdala ... They had just switched out the real dead body, and Jesus hadn't managed to get back to the tomb fast enough to complete the illusion. Faking the nail & spear & thorn wounds on his hands, side & head would be trivial.

Some traditions later have Pilate and his wife martyred as xtians ...

The Register meets the voice of Siri Down Under

jake Silver badge

Re: It had to be "Karen"

"It's probable these days that women called Alexa may well decide to go by 'Alex' instead!"

Most of the gals I know with the name[0] allow either. One insists on Alexa "because that's my name!".

[0] Half a dozen-ish, aged between 10 and 85.

jake Silver badge

Re: It had to be "Karen"

Here in the US, Alexa was a fairly popular girls name for the quarter century starting in roughly 1980. I know several women with the name. The number of babies given the name dropped precipitously when Amazon appropriated it. None of the folks I know have changed names as a result ... in fact, a couple of them refer to the thing as "that Amazon bitch".

jake Silver badge

Re: Anyone remember how to READ a map?

I've been working with and on the bleeding-edge of the technical world for over half a century now.

I still much prefer a good paper map to the electronic equivalent.

Google will delete data collected from 'private' browsing

jake Silver badge

Re: AlphaGoo deleting data? Bullshit.

That's not "data", that's proprietary corporate intellectual property that must be permanently destroyed so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands.

jake Silver badge

AlphaGoo deleting data? Bullshit.

AlphaGoo has never deleted anything, because keeping data is what they do, and has been what they do for the quarter century of their existence. They aren't going to start deleting stuff now. Anybody who thinks otherwise is a fool. Even if they very publicly go out of their way to "prove" that the data is off their systems ... well, that's what backups are for. And you know they have backups. They may even "prove" they delete the backups. That's what off-site backups are for. And you know they have those, too. In duplicate.

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