* Posts by Dog11

56 posts • joined 28 Aug 2010

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Das reboot: That's the only thing to do when the screenshot, er, freezes

Dog11
Boffin

Re: Funny that

Eh, I had one client who accidently switched the default language of Windows. To Hangul (Korean). Fortunately, all the windows system stuff works the same, and if you've done settings enough you can figure how to change it even if you can't read any of the options.

The Rise of The (Coffee) Machines: I need assistance. I think I'm running Windows. Send help

Dog11

Re: Not quite Windows

Personally, I always liked the error messages in haiku form:

Chaos reigns within.

Reflect, repent, and reboot.

Order shall return.

Ransomware scumbags leak Boeing, Lockheed Martin, SpaceX documents after contractor refuses to pay

Dog11

Re: Pity

make nuclear weapons obsolete, so that the United States can have something better, with which to effect regime change in Russia and China

We badly need to effect regime change in the United States and the UK, too.

The Wristwatch of the Long Now: When your MTBF is two centuries

Dog11
Go

Re: Beware survival bias

In my experience, 8" floppies were far more reliable than 5.25, and vastly more than 3.5. They would remain usable after physical damage that would kill a 3.5. I never had read problems even when the disk was 10 years old. (I really should dig the hardware and disks out of the attic and see how they've held up 25 years later, but probably the electrolytics and the rubber bits have gone bad.) I think the big difference is that 8" has much fatter (and thus more redundant) tracks.

Google product boss cuffed on suspicion of murder after his Microsoft manager wife goes missing, woman's body found, during Hawaii trip

Dog11
Holmes

Re: Well done The Register for not ignoring the question of feminicide in the world

Most people who are killed, are killed by people they know. Killers are far less likely to have a beef (real or imaginary) with strangers. I don't doubt that women come out on the wrong side of killings by intimate partners/family members, though.

A Notepad nightmare leaves sysadmin with something totally unprintable

Dog11

Re: Support ticket

Muscle memory. Your fingers know that you need to hit "save & exit" to avoid losing work. If your brain knows better, it will start screaming at you a nanosecond after you've clicked or depressed the key.

Dog11
WTF?

Re: That triggered a memory...

I had a neatnik client who tidied up his drive by deleting junk files, including "." (and maybe ".."). It had never occurred to me that was even possible. Fortunately, at that point he wasn't able to overwrite the erased files..

Where's our data, Google? Chrome 79 update 'a catastrophe' for Android devs with WebView apps

Dog11

You mean, store backup to a server when a connection becomes available, the same as the typical PC program (MSWord etc.) does?

Why is the printer spouting nonsense... and who on earth tried to wire this plug?

Dog11
Alert

Re: Knob and Tube

Eh, that's normal for old US houses. Mine was built before electricity (the walls had gas jets for light). Then came knob & tube. Then upgraded to individual wires (no cables) insulated with bitumen (or rubber, now it's just a brittle black material) and fabric, the stuff that when iit gets old all the insulation falls off if you disturb it, and a single neutral cleverly serving several circuits. Connections twisted together and (I think) soldered, wrapped with friction tape. Then Romex (2-wire cable). Only later was work done with plastic sheathed cable with a ground wire (and sometimes surface-mount conduit). Somebody added a ground wire to some of the fixtures, stapled to the woodwork and going who knows where. The K&T is gone now, and the gas pipes disconnected, but everything else I disturb as little as possible, so far so good. I'm banking on the fact that CFL/LED illumination has significantly reduced the load to save me.

Bad news: 'Unblockable' web trackers emerge. Good news: Firefox with uBlock Origin can stop it. Chrome, not so much

Dog11

Re: Come the revolution...

SpaceX has been designated as prime contractor for the B ark.

Can't you hear me knocking? But I installed a smart knocker

Dog11

Re: The joys of automation...

A physical lock with an old fashioned brass key that could get picked

You must have a higher class of burglar than we do. Here, the height of sophistication is to check to see if the doors or windows are unlocked, before just smashing things until they're in. They once smashed a window in my truck to break in, without noticing that the door wasn't locked. Stole a GPS that I'd paid $10 for at a rummage sale.

Judge shoots down Trump admin's efforts to allow folks to post shoddy 3D printer gun blueprints online

Dog11

Re: Why a 3D printed gun?

In the US, if you can't buy a gun legitimately...

You can buy an "80% lower" (the lower receiver is what is deemed to be "the gun", and 80% completed counts only as a chunk of metal) that will require a bit more do-it-yourself machining to complete. There is no restriction on purchasing that, or any of the rest of the parts. You might not be able to legally possess the finished product, but who's to know? Or, you can buy a black powder gun (think reproductions of 19th century revolvers), which doesn't count as a gun either. But in all honesty, it likely wouldn't be difficult to find a proper factory-made gun, perhaps purchased from a private party who doesn't ask too many questions.

In a lot of other countries those angles may not work, though..

The safest place to save your files is somewhere nobody will ever look

Dog11
Mushroom

Re: Been there. Done that.

Back in MSDOS days, I had a client who was a neatnik. He deleted all the junk files, including the ones named "." and "..". It had never occurred to me that would even be possible.

Dog11
Holmes

Re: Been there. Done that.

Functional grouping of icons. I do that myself. With 88 desktop icons, you need a system. Security, utilities, video editing, sound editing, graphics, communications all have their own cluster. No digging through layers to find them. Besides, if I don't have the icons in front of me, I forget I have the programs, some of which I might use only once a year. It's like desk drawers, anything that goes into a drawer leaves the known universe. And yes, I do have a program (I will NOT call it "an app") to restore the icons to their proper positions after Microsoft randomly rearranges them.

Google sounds the alarm over Android flaw being exploited in the wild, possibly by NSO

Dog11
Alien

The Pixel 1 that I bought (off eBay, used) is being updated (and has already been updated to Android 10). It's well neigh 3 years old at this point. The battery may eventually be an issue (it's ok so far), but much of the cause of glued batteries is the (silly) demand for thinner phones. Obviously none of the phone makers (or carriers selling "free" locked-in phones) give a crap, updates are just an annoying extra expense. Google does have a vested interest in their own brand, though.

Now that's integrity: Bloke sinks 7 beers, turns himself in. Cops weren't looking for him

Dog11

A baloney sandwich on white bread is a "decent cooked breakfast"? And as to the ride home, not a chance. Not in the USA.

Fairytale for 2019: GNOME to battle a patent troll in court

Dog11
Holmes

Re: Subsequent litigation.

Perhaps because that government bureaucracy makes much of its funding from fees charged to patent and trademark applicants, so it has an incentive to maximize the number of patents issued. The subsequent litigation is just collateral damage.

Consumer campaign to keep receiving printed till receipts looks like a good move – on paper

Dog11

Re: The security guard monitoring it wanted to see

You have far more faith in the likelihood of a smart police officer than I do. And, in the event of a not-smart one, the naive belief that their employer, or a court, will do anything about it.

One person's harmless japery can be another's night of LaserJet Lego

Dog11

Re: I know the series well...

A lot of places didn't run that much paper through them. I've got a 4000 (still a nice printer, though the plastic is a tad flimsy) bought at a computer salvage store a few years ago for $50, it only had about 6000 pages on the counter (less than one month's rated output). Added a $10 eBay JetDirect card. It replaced a 4 (purchased at a thrift store for $25) that had developed feed problems (the rubber roller probably got hard from age).

Enjoying that 25Mbps internet speed, America? Oh, it's just 6Mbps? And you're unhappy? Can't imagine why

Dog11
Boffin

Re: No @#$&

...and squaring the deck up nicely, and drawing a diagonal line across the edge with a marker, to provide a rough visual indicator of order.

Let's make laptops from radium. How's that for planned obsolescence?

Dog11
Big Brother

Re: Straws

Feh. I've got a beard that's maybe two decades old, and I don't have to drink through straws. Wiping your mouth (with the back of your hand, if you don't have a napkin) is usually enough, so long as you wash your face more than once a week.

Honey, hive had it with this drone: Couple lived for years with thousands of bees in bedroom wall

Dog11
Alien

Re: bees in the wall

It happens. When I was little, a hive took residence in my parents' bedroom wall. I don't know how long it was there, though I do recall watching (from the safety of a car with windows rolled up) as my dad climbed a ladder on the outside with a vacuum cleaner and put it to the hole the bees used as their vestibule. This annoyed the bees, who began boiling out around the nozzle of the vacuum, followed by my father dropping the vacuum, leaping off the ladder, and running. A professional eventually removed the bees, leaving us with enough honeycomb so my mom canned it and we ate it for years.

Long-distance dildo devotee deploys ding-dong over data deceit

Dog11

Re: re: why a manufacturer thought it would be fine to store details of the use of its products

Maybe that's all your post office logs. In the "land of the nominally free", they keep images of all the sides for both letters and parcels. Whether those images are OCR'd and the data sent to your permanent file is not specified.

Oracle AI's Eurovision horror show: How bad can it be? Yep. Badder

Dog11

Re: Bloody tears

Long ago, before Windows, I had a program that would accept two text file inputs and generate a new text in their style. Fed with Shakespeare and a geological tech report, it generated the immortal line "Wherefore art thou, Ridgeton Gravel Pit?" Surely such programs still exist, though a quick search failed to turn up anything similar ("text" seems now synonymous with "SMS"),

Giga-hurts radio: Terrorists build Wi-Fi bombs to dodge cops' cellphone jammers

Dog11
Black Helicopters

Re: Re:have a machine with a 4G module just poll a random Reddit page

terrorists (outside of Hollywood) are not exactly technical wizards - they go to terrorist school to learn how to make a bomb, they do not go for an engineering degree and then take that knowledge and build a bomb from scratch.

I dunno. In the Middle East, an engineering degree seems to have been a career enhancer in Al Quaida. Engineering and other tech backgrounds... one of the Gitmo prisoners claimed to have Microsoft certifications. And even if that's just the upper echlons, no reason why the grunt in the field has to be the one who designs or manufactures the hardware.

A day in the life of London seen through spam and weak Wi-Fi

Dog11

I don't see SEO spam by email (maybe it gets filtered out somewhere, though I have to filter the headhunter spam out myself, they seem to think I'm one of them). But the SEO spammers robocall me. When that happens I press "1" to speak to an agent, and put the call on hold playing bad jazz at them. Gives them something to do.

'I do not wish to surrender' Julian Assange tells court over US extradition bid

Dog11
Black Helicopters

Re: The USA wants Assange for what he did

>how they enjoy the ability to criticize veterans beneath the cover of freedom they so enjoy each day.

I still find it difficult to identify how the US attack on Iraq has enhanced the freedom of either Americans or Iraqis. Perhaps American companies have secured the oil, but that's "freedom" only in the sense of "freedom to loot". For Americans, the government spies on them more than they did before. For Iraqis, who had a dictatorial government but relative equality between the sexes, freedom from religious bigotry, and a decent educational system with a fairly high standard of living, that has been traded for a huge number of deaths, a poisoned landscape, a corrupt government, sectarian strife, little to no health care, crime, and a collapsed standard of living.

Dog11

Re: The USA wants Assange for what he did

>how they enjoy the ability to criticize veterans beneath the cover of freedom they so enjoy each day.

I still find it difficult to identify how the US attack on Iraq has enhanced the freedom of either Americans or Iraqis. Perhaps American companies have secured the oil, but that's "freedom" only in the sense of "freedom to loot". For Americans, the government spies on them more than they did before. For Iraqis, who had a dictatorial government but relative equality between the sexes, freedom from religious bigotry, and a decent educational system with a fairly high standard of living, that has been traded for a huge number of deaths, a corrupt government, sectarian strife, little to no health care, crime, and a collapsed standard of living.

Welcome. You're now in a timeline in which US presidential hopeful Beto was a member of a legendary hacker crew

Dog11

Re: This is awesome

He "STOLE PHONE TIME"? Eh, Steve Jobs SOLD BLUE BOXES. (See, my caps lock sticks, too!) It gives me hope that there may be a politician who's more conversant with technology than merely being able to make 4 AM tweets on his phone. He doesn't need to be current, but at least will know what a supermarket scanner is, and what the Internet is. Guess I need to find out more about him.

London Gatwick Airport reopens but drone chaos perps still not found

Dog11
Mushroom

Re: machine gun?

@RancidRodent I'd be more than surprised if a 9mm hollow point fired at a 70 degree angle from a sub machine gun/pistol could make it much further than a kilometre.

The accepted maximum range of a 9mm bullet fired from a handgun is 2300m. Fired from something with a longer barrel, it would be a bit more. Range does depend on bullet weight, but hollow points tend to be about the same weight (and aerodynamics) as solids to make the ballistics about the same as solid bullets. Range also depends on muzzle velocity, which for typical 9mm cartridges will peak at about a 16 inch barrel, yielding a velocity increase of about 30% over a handgun's 4 inch barrel. That would give a max range of around 2990m. So are there any unprotected people within 3km of Gatwick?

Dog11

Re: War time innovation

African or European swallow?

Apple forgot to lock Intel Management Engine in laptops, so get patching

Dog11

Obscurity

isn't all security based on some dependence on obscurity?

Nope. If I brick the doorway up, there's nothing obscure about it at all. But you won't walk through it.

Why are sat-nav walking directions always so hopeless?

Dog11

Re: never seems to taste the same?

if you're limited on volts , just top it up with amps to make a lovely batch of kilowatts

The thing is, how many amps you can pull without melting your wiring depends on how heavy the wire is. This limits US appliances to 1.8 kw. Google suggests that the UK has kettles running anywhere up to 3 kw (twice the voltage, twice the power, using the same thickness of wire).

It may be poor man's Photoshop, but GIMP casts a Long Shadow with latest update

Dog11

Re: once you put half a day or a day into it, it's actually easier

That really doesn't matter. You've lost most of the potential users in the first half day.

That must be why everybody uses Movie Maker instead of Adobe Premiere, eh?

Fingered: Pants-down 'poo jogger' alleged to be corp exec

Dog11

Perhaps he was aiming for a spot on the Privy Council?

Fixing a printer ended with a dozen fire engines in the car park

Dog11

Re: Don't wear high vis

army squaddies in their usual full cammo fatigues, plus each with a high-vis vest

Somewhere in my closet I have a (US Army) safety vest. The entire thing is dark olive drab, but if you shine a light on it red reflective bands will shine back. I liked the incongruity. I guess the idea was that the enemy would be silently creeping in the dark, not driving vehicles with headlights on.

LLVM contributor hits breakpoint, quits citing inclusivity intolerance

Dog11

Re: White Hysteria?

@WatAWorld

SJW is the label THEY GAVE THEMSELVES. We capitalized the term because they don't fight for social justice, they fight for identity politics and discrimination.

I'd never heard that. I've never heard anyone describe themself as a SJW. Can you give a cite for usage prior to (negative) use by... trying to avoid terms you don't like... your group of friends?

'I crashed AOL for 19 hours and messed up global email for a week'

Dog11
Childcatcher

Re: Sendmail hacking to the rescue

Considering floppy disks used to carry 1.44 megs meaning 40 megs held less than thirty disks, and even back then a single floppy held basically not a whole lot of anything, that sounds a tad bit optimistic

You had 1.44M floppies? You kids didn't know when you had it good. We had 180K floppies, and were grateful for it, didn't have to hump cartons of punchcatds around anymore.

Batteries are so heavy, said user. If I take it out, will this thing work?

Dog11

Oh, you mean the hard drive?

Uber: Ah yeah, we pay women drivers less than men. We can explain!

Dog11

poor, hesitant, slow and drivers lacking in confidence are WAY more annoying for other participants in traffic. Those are overwhelmingly women.

While this may be statistically true for women in general (I don't know), it is likely linked to driving experience (hours put in behind the wheel). I suspect women get less (ever notice how when a couple goes somewhere, it's almost always the male who drives?).

But I also suspect that's not going to be true of the women who choose to drive for Uber. Those women aren't likely to be the ones who are nervous behind the wheel.

Fridge killed my baby? Mag-field radiation from household stuff 'boosts miscarriage risk'

Dog11

Re: So who is Kaiser Permanente and what is "Scientific Reports" ?

Does anyone recall the studies about increased miscarriage rates of VDU operators in the 80's and 90's?...

...it turns out the key stroke recording systems were timing the operators and if you weren't fast, couldn't stay fast or were fast but inaccurate you could be fired, which (surprise surprise) the operators found quite stressful.

I dunno, but in the early 90s I troubleshot an office with a number of IBM Displaywriters (1 MHz 8086 with a CRT). One secretary complained hers made her break out in a rash on her arms. My theory was that it was maybe the electrostatic field on the CRT faceplate (if you held your arm near it, you could feel the hairs stand up) or maybe the dust that it attracted. A screen filter (glass with a metalized coating that was grounded) solved her problem. Psychosomatic? No way to know, and since she stopped complaining we didn't care.

Heating is not the only possible effect.

Red panic: Best Buy yanks Kaspersky antivirus from shelves

Dog11

Re: What a turn round

Amusing to see the hard left Dems taking up McCarthyism and checking for reds under the bed.

There are no "hard left Dems" in Congress. The Dems are a center-right party, by world standards. So Congress has only "center-right" and "extreme right" wings. The US has been drifting right since the 1980s (it never has been left).

Dog11

Re: What a turn round

Amusing to see the hard left Dems taking up McCarthyism and checking for reds under the bed.

There are no "hard left Dems" in Congress. The Dems are a center-right party, by world standards. So Congress has only "center-right" and "extreme right" wings.

UK not as keen on mobile wallets as mainland Europe and US

Dog11

I live in the US, and while I'm aware of the existence of phone payment, I have never seen anyone actually do it. As far as that goes, I don't think I've ever seen anyone do a contactless payment, either. And PIN is rare for credit cards (more common with debit cards). Not everywhere even has working chip readers, though they are becoming more common (and disliked, because the chip is slower than a swipe). Typically over some floor limit (~$50) you'll need a signature, chip or no. Even if there is a signature, it's rare for a clerk to look at it, though occasionally a clerk will notice a card that hasn't been signed yet, and get the customer to sign it (in that case, of course, the signature always matches the credit slip).

Shadow Brokers crack open NSA hacking tool cache for world+dog

Dog11

Re: "Assad is a doctor"

@who really doubts that the USA had good intel on aircraft movements that matched the attack?

Oh, nobody has doubts about that. Where the doubt comes in is that we don't know whether the USA lied about it.

Dishwasher has directory traversal bug

Dog11

Re: Bewildered. (That's grown-up speak for "wtf")

@AC "prosumer"

Wankiest word of the day.

It's been in use for quite a while. E.g. a video cam that costs $4K (which was what a Panasonic DVX-100B went for new, though today it's called "obsolete"). That's way less than a real pro cam, but almost as good and way more than Uncle Bob will spend to make pictures of the kids.

Two words, Mozilla: SPEED! NOW! Quit fiddling and get serious

Dog11

Re: Thunderbird

"In Thunderbird, F3 isn't used for anything at all. Why not attach it to the search function? Another couple of common keystrokes for search are CTRL-F and CTRL-S. Guess what they do in Thunderbird? Yep. Nothing. Morons."

Ctrl+F opens a "Find in Page" toolbar at the bottom of the Message Pane in my Thunderbird v45.7.0 on Linux Mint. F3 then does "Find Again in Current Message".

And 45.7.1 does the same in Win10.

Trump's FBI boss, Attorney General picks reckon your encryption's getting backdoored

Dog11

Re: Back to MD5, et. al.

it will be like the restrictive gun ownership laws in most European countries. Bad guys and bad governments will have boat loads of them, working people will have to be nice like sheep, hoping nothing bad happens to them.

Yeah. Like US gun owners stopped the "Patriot" act from being passed and enforced. Like they prevented Shrub from attacking Iraq. Like they prevented Ruby Ridge and Waco. Like they stopped government torturers. Like they blocked the path to the White House for TV stars with fascist tendencies.

Hopefully, it was just a bad analogy.

Sysadmin figures out dating agency worker lied in his profile

Dog11
Holmes

Re: Bless....

Sure you can still get Letraset, though it's a bit harder to find these days. How else to make a front panel with lettering that looks silkscreened? A little polyurethane varnish on top will make it just about indestructible.

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