* Posts by cyberdemon

685 posts • joined 26 Jan 2010

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Cloudflare explains how it managed to break the internet

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: CDNs are evil!

The worst example of this problem, of course, being Google AMP. Pages auto-mangled by Google, and the original website doesn't even know that you looked at it.

To Room 101 with it

RSAC branded a 'super spreader event' as attendees share COVID-19 test results

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: The safer each individual is, the safer the whole population becomes

Taiwan and China are very similar economies in that their main economic driver is export goods, not services. The UK economy is mainly services and very little export. (yes I agree this needs to be fixed, but you are not being realistic if you think this can change on the scale of years - it takes decades, even if we could find something that we could export competitively ...)

But, surely you must realise, that our service-based economy is impacted much more by covid-fear than Taiwan's export-based economy. Taiwan mostly produce computer chips that already come out of clean-rooms and heavily automated factories ... Economically speaking at least, it is Much easier for them to weather the storm of covid.

cyberdemon Silver badge
WTF?

Re: The safer each individual is, the safer the whole population becomes

Ok, so are you saying that we should continue to ban public gatherings (China style), and damn the economic consequences for the hospitality, events, travel & other service sectors (which make up the bulk of the UK economy) in the face of a recession and spiralling inflation?

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: The safer each individual is, the safer the whole population becomes

Ok, so nothing makes you completely safe (not even the vaccine, that I remember being told would give 95% protection against serious illness) - but surely a balance has to be struck somewhere?

There is danger in all aspects of life, and it may well be that humanity is doomed anyway - if our population keeps growing then something will come and get us in the end, be it war, famine, other kinds of pestilence etc. Or just plain old Death: If I am covid-positive but have no symptoms, and I am hit by a bus, then I would still count as a covid death. I think that quirk of the reporting may be behind some of the recent claims that "omicron killed more people than delta" for example.

If 50% of the population have covid then (approximately) 50% of all deaths will be covid deaths, even if nobody died from covid. And this is especially true if (even non-deadly or vaccine-protected variants of) covid is present in places where people usually go to die, such as hospitals and care homes.

I think your arguments (that we should all be as safe as we possibly can be) are very similar to those around Nuclear Power. It is not possible to reduce the risk to zero, but if we double or treble the time and cost of each plant by mandating hyper-redundant safety systems, core-poisoning shutdown systems etc, (or by banning new builds altogether and/or closing existing ones) then we can marginally reduce the safety risk.

After all that, we find that other things have killed us, i.e. carbon emissions, particulates, and, ironically, airborne radioactivity, from burning coal and oil.

How safe is "safe enough" for you? When can we have our lives back? Or would you have us sat in our basements wearing masks on zoom calls for evermore?

cyberdemon Silver badge
Black Helicopters

Crossbreed or are crossbred?

Indian government issues confidential infosec guidance to staff – who leak it

cyberdemon Silver badge
Linux

Re: "check the popularity of the app and read the user reviews [...]"

A better approach might be to set up a repository of open source apps for their employees to use, and disable the Google/Apple app stores.

Unfortunately this approach is not very feasible because Google and Apple have done their very best to kill off any open source development on their platforms, and they have largely succeeded.

There are some holding out against this tyranny though, such as /e/os, but thanks to Android's horrendously complicated SDK, it is almost impossible for an end-user to build even /e/os from source.

SpaceX staff condemn Musk's behavior in open letter

cyberdemon Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: This is what late stage Elon looks like

If by 'laying the foundations', you mean 'digging its grave', then yes.

Not a GNOME fan, and like the look of Windows? Try KDE Plasma or Cinnamon

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: CDE

You have shown the grey of your beard!

Maybe you should try NsCDE: https://github.com/NsCDE/NsCDE

cyberdemon Silver badge
Linux

Re: I know it's the pettiest gripe ever...

Nothing wrong with the K-cog logo IMO, but the newer "three dots and a triangle" "Plasma" logo does annoy me a bit.

But you're right it is the pettiest gripe ever. KDE 5.x + is great. KDE 4 made me try Trinity and XFCE, but I switched back since KDE 5 - they have fixed all the issues IMO. KDE 5 in terms of power and reliability is now here KDE 3.5 was, but with all the modern bells and whistles. Printers just work, better than they do on windows (which isn't saying much I suppose) bluetooth (mouse, headset etc.) just works, most VPNs just work (many of which you would need third-party clients for on Windows), and KDE Connect is so good that they ported it to Windows.

Mine's the one with the border-less Konsole (no menu bar, tab bar or scroll bar. Of course I still have tabs, but I cycle through them with ctrl+arrowkey, spawn them with ctrl+shift+N, and close them with EOF i.e. ctrl+D)

UK Home Office signs order to extradite Julian Assange to US

cyberdemon Silver badge
Coffee/keyboard

Re: Appeal

Moral Authority? Priti Patel? <cough, choke>

Home Secretary is a position of Moral Authority. But Priti Patel is only Interested in Authority, not Morality.

In fact, she seems to relish in the suffering of others - especially the Syrians, Ukranians & Iraqi Kurds who have genuine claims of asylum

Making her home secretary was like asking Dr Mengele to run an immigration, detention & policing system.

Meta slammed with eight lawsuits claiming social media hurts kids

cyberdemon Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Re: True AI - nobody sees it for what it is

My question is, why would anyone trust this company with their credit card info over say, their web browser - and why did anyone think this useless company is worth 300 million?

No more fossil fuel or nukes? In the future we will generate power with magic dust

cyberdemon Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: re Fukushima

No, the cancer deaths from the coal station are significantly worse, due to inhaled nanoparticulates, as well as radioactive material contained in the millions of tonnes of coal burnt, which dwarfs any (normally functioning) nuclear plant emissions.

Yes of course there was a detectable increase in radiation after fukushima (the thing about radioactivity is, it is so easily detectable in the tiniest quantities, yet not at all harmful in those quantities) but the particulate emissions and chemical spills from more traditional industries are much more harmful, but not so easily detectable.

As AC said, the cancer rates are estimated to have increased by a factor of about 0.05 in 4000

There is a huge amount of fear around nuclear power - partly because people are so terrified of nuclear weapons and don't understand the difference between 1) a supercritical nuclear bomb blast, 2) a 'critical' controlled reactor, 3) 'subcritical' fissile material - the highest level of 'nuclear waste', and 4) radioactive but non-fissile material, as leaked from fukushima but also occurs naturally everywhere.

But partly also I think, due to vested interests (oil) who can make huge profit by spreading anti-nuclear FUD.

This FUD of course pushes up the cost of nuclear, which then adds to the anti-nuclear argument.

Microsoft accidentally turned off hardware requirements for Windows 11

cyberdemon Silver badge
Linux

Re: My only use for windows is gaming.

Technically speaking, many games run better on Linux than they do on Windows (better Vulkan support etc) even with non-native games. Proton is so f~~king good. Even my VR games work, thanks to Steam's amazing Linux support.

Note that the games don't have to "officially" support proton either - you can turn on "use Proton/SteamPlay for all titles" in Steam, and you will find that almost everything works out of the box. A lot has changed in the last few years in the world of Linux gaming thanks to Valve/Proton.

However, some games try to install windows rootkits under the guise of anti-cheat, and these games do not work well in Proton.

Makers of ad blockers and browser privacy extensions fear the end is near

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: Does anyone need more justification

Well, they can pry my whitelist javascript-blocker (scriptsafe) out of my cold, dead hands.

Also, I use Chromium, which is supposedly "open source", so they can't really prevent a fork.

Tough news for Apple as EU makes USB-C common charging port for most electronic devices

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: Micro USB

Apple could happily include both ports. They could even sell a short cable that has an inline female USB-C and a magsafe (which gets you an extra USB port by not using the builtin USB-C for charging, and make it "feel better" on your knee, apparently)

As long as you can still charge directly through the USB-C without any proprietary shit, it should be compliant.

But as it stands, they are devaluing other brands by making Apple-only chargers ubiquitous - which is an antitrust move.

Intel plans immersion lab to chill its power-hungry chips

cyberdemon Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: Rheenergise

Er, mineral oil is usually less dense than water. Even what sigma-aldrich describes as "heavy mineral oil" has a density of 0.88g/ml i.e. 12% lighter than water.

Bituminous tar might be slightly heavier (certainly not 2.5x), but its viscosity is somewhat problematic...

I have never heard of an oil which is 2x denser than water AND comparable in viscosity.

Mercury could be an option if it wasn't so rare and toxic..

Patents are not something to hide-behind. The idea is that when you patent something, you publish it to the world and use the patent system to protect the idea. But if there is no patent, then it is either "unprotected" against being pilfered, or more likely, it doesn't exist.

> And, not to put too fine a point on it, if this isn't a solution, what is? Burn oil and gas till it runs out? Pray that fusion can be made to work in anything other than H-Bomb format for more than a minute?

As I said: We have some extremely good fission designs that are capable of burning nuclear waste and even old weapons stockpiles with no need to mine or enrich any more uranium. That is literally free energy. CANDU is one example, but there are even better (intrinsically safer = cheaper) reactor designs that we were developing before the world (or at least the West) turned against nuclear.

NIMBYs be damned, nukes are what we need. But you are right, the public attitude, poorly-defined regulation (ALARA principle) and lack of expertise in the UK means that while the Chinese can build a nuke plant in China for less than £5 billion in 5 years, we (or even the Chinese) can't build one in the UK for £25 billion in 10 years.

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Rheenergise

Wow, that's amazing. Just one teeny-tiny snag: What is this magical R-19 fluid that they say is 2.5 times heavier than water and just as low viscosity? What is it made of (they don't say..) and how do you propose to manufacture billions of tonnes of the stuff? (the nice thing about water you see, is we literally have oceans of it and it rains from the heavens) Even if that were plausible, what is the pollution hazard?

That is the purest greenwash I have ever seen. It is amazing that people like yourself are daft enough to give it credit.

(I'm not surprised that it gets investment though - investors will put their money into anything that they think other people will invest in, so as long as they are in the cool kids club they can pull their money out before the stupid losers. see: Ponzi Scheme)

If they had one single chemist or chemical engineer on their team, or if they would give the formula for their (presumably patent-protected) R-19, then my eyebrows might not rise so high.

cyberdemon Silver badge
Mushroom

@AC Re: Cloudy climate change

> given the marginal fuel of choice in most countries is gas; any demand you add to the system that wasn't there before is by definition, gas powered. This includes electric cars!

Yep, and along with heat pumps, the distribution network is going to need a serious injection of Copper in order to support them.

Your electric meter doesn't show you how much energy is wasted in the "low"-voltage wiring that runs under (or over) your street, but it is significant, and it goes up with the square of current. If you've ever noticed your lights dimming slightly when you turn the electric cooker/shower/kettle on, then please DO NOT get an electric car. Your local distribution network is overloaded and an electric car would waste a huge chunk of the juice it consumes (and any DC load like an electric car will typically draw MORE current as the voltage drops). In the worst case, electric cars in Australia will cause overhead lines to catch fire, with all the consequences that entails.. The distribution network was never designed for them.

> "ahhhh, no, windmills don't work all the time" yada.

Well, sorry but they don't. And batteries will never fix that, not even if we poured all the world's resources into making more batteries.

What could actually save us would be to de-regulate nuclear power. Nuclear power is actually pretty simple and easy, and it would be extremely cheap if people weren't so bloody scared of it. Well what is more scary, slowly starving/freezing/burning to death, or ionising radiation that has been part of the background of this planet since it first became a planet?

As for nuclear weapons proliferation, there are modern reactor designs (Thorium, etc.) that can actually burn nuclear waste and ageing weapons stockpiles as fuel - no need to mine any more uranium, we have enough nuclear fuel to last us centuries. But there are big vested interests (oil companies) who are dead set against that, and they love to frighten and manipulate the hippie types.

Wind power is indeed not good for grid stability, and it benefits the oil and gas industry enormously because of that fact. As soon as the wind stops blowing, the gas power stations start printing money, because every country needs to keep the lights on, and since we shunned nuclear, gas is all we have to do that.

> WIth enough of them, backed up by storage; you cut gas demand entirely outside of chemical feedstock.

No, really you won't. A country the size of the UK needs about 30-40GW to power its grid. When the wind stops blowing, we need 20GW of gas, because we only have 5GW of nuclear (and don't even get me started on the folly of Biomass)

https://gridwatch.co.uk/

For the last week of April and the first week of May, the UK had almost no wind, and used a horrendous 6TWh of gas-fired electricity over those two weeks.

For scale, a factory that produces 1GWh/year of battery capacity is apparently called a Gigafactory. The entire world has around 1 TWh of batteries IN TOTAL, and that includes all cars and grid-storage banks. We would need the world's entire stock of batteries three times over just to replace gas in the UK for one week of calm weather.

And when you factor in the energy cost of producing those batteries in the first place, you can see it's a mug's game.

(I'm not saying that batteries don't help at all - they DO help in frequency regulation, providing a replacement for mechanical inertia, to stabilise the grid against sudden load changes so that you have the extra few minutes required to spin up a big GAS turbine - but they do NOT provide bulk energy storage on anywhere near the order of magnitude that we need, and they never will)

cyberdemon Silver badge
Holmes

@ Bombastic Bob

You are Piers Corbyn and I claim my five pounds!

Big Tech loves talking up privacy – while trying to kill privacy legislation

cyberdemon Silver badge
Terminator

Re: better then in china

Even better when it's both.

(If you are actively manipulated by facebook/Google/MS/Amazon et chums, how much freedom have you lost?)

Safari is crippling the mobile market, and we never even noticed

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: Meh

Interesting, I always blamed WebKit for the lack of Text Reflow on Android.

If they use the same renderer as on desktop, then WTF is the excuse for lack of text reflow on Android? There used to be an extension that sort-of provided it (but it could only handle one page of text at a time, so no scrolling) and since the Fenix update, it is no longer available.

Maybe it is so that they can enforce a "Consistent mobile experience" with iOS, where they -ARE- forced through WebKit ?

If so, then how can I compile my own version of the Firefox APK that supports Text Reflow?

(What do you mean "You can't, it's not That kind of Open Source")

(I really lament the dearth (or death?) of open source apps on Android)

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: Meh

Actually, on mobile, it IS based on Google's engine.

Everything (including Firefox) is forced through Google's WebView API, which is responsible for rendering a DOM, and this blocks things like Text Reflow.

Thus, if you want to zoom in on the text of a webpage, on mobile you have no choice but to pan left and right.

I'm sure that Google Analytics provides a handy breakdown of the bits of the webpage that you zoom and pan over though.

Beijing needs the ability to 'destroy' Starlink, say Chinese researchers

cyberdemon Silver badge
Mushroom

RE: EMP Them!

Capital Idea!

Now, where's my steerable EMP device

Ah, here it is! ---------------------------------------->

Much cheaper, more maneuverable, and more effective EMP than some fangled array of coils and capacitors. And it just-about fits the description of "a small reactor" (sans containment and control systems of course)

Start your engines: Windows 11 ready for broad deployment

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

@ OP

> Still stinging about my inability to "upgrade" because my HP 360 (£1500) has "only" an I7v7.

Count your blessings. You'd be stinging even more if your system actually supported it, and you suddenly woke up one morning with a slow, bloated, spyware-infested piece of shite where your OS used to be.

US fears China may have ten exascale systems by 2025

cyberdemon Silver badge
Coffee/keyboard

@ StargateSg7

Did you forget to take your pills again?

In one of your earlier posts, you say you are just a graphics programmer, so what qualifies you to make the above outrageous statements?

> We (Who?) obliterate Intel, AMD, Samsung, NEC, Micron, IBM, Global Foundries, TSMC, etc.

See icon.

Where are your academic publications? Your other post mentioned some GPL-licensed predictions of high temperature superconductors, so where is the public repo?

Ad-tech firms grab email addresses from forms before they're even submitted

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: GDPR?

Well, obviously "taking back control" meant giving the tories the power to dispense with any rules that stop them from: Giving billions of pounds of public money to their mates, cracking down on any form of opposition to their power, and screwing over the general public for the benefit of their corporate sponsors.

As one AC put it: The consumer is meant to consume, not complain.

Deepfake attacks can easily trick live facial recognition systems online

cyberdemon Silver badge
Alien

Re: Artificial Mimickry

I'm sure your 70% figure is hyperbole, and the argument still stands: If someone really cannot give a meaningful explanation of why they came to a particular conclusion, then they should not be included in important decisions (such as voting in a referendum or general election, forming part of a jury, or deciding whether a caller is genuine or a fraud), nor should they perhaps be included in the definition of "intelligent life"..

cyberdemon Silver badge
Pirate

Re: The Shaman was Right

Many banks already use "voice recognition" for authentication of their telephone banking system.

Does anyone remember the 2001 computer game "Uplink"?

All you had to do was call up the victim, record their voice saying "Hello?.. Hello?? Who is this?" and that was enough to generate a voice-print response to authenticate with their bank and rob them.

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: Artificial Mimickry

"AI" based authentication is also a great way to embed deniable backdoors in all kinds of software, as reported in an earlier reg article

cyberdemon Silver badge
Big Brother

Re: Artificial Mimickry

> and it is dead-easy to make a new deepfake that fools it.

And I will add: At that point it becomes just an endless arms race, where the only way to get ahead is to collect and analyse more and more data, from every human being on the planet, just to make better fakes and better fake-spotters, and better fakes...

Until the only way to prove that you are human is to authenticate with your cryptographically-secure Human ID issued to you at birth (which may be rescinded at any time for naughtiness, at which point you would be considered a fake by the machines).

And at that point we will have stepped into George Orwell's most famous dystopia.

Please authenticate as Human before you can watch your "Sky Glass" Telescreen. (It is still watching you and it already knows exactly who you are, but you must authenticate anyway, in case you have been replaced by a fake)

Oops, ID check failed. See you in Room 101

cyberdemon Silver badge
Holmes

Artificial Mimickry

Honestly I think the term "AI" should be banned. It misleads the public into thinking that there is some kind of intelligence in the machine.

But as anyone with a clue knows, these systems are nothing more than statistical regression. (multi-dimensional statistical regression yes, with lots of fancy optimisation over an enormous dataset to make it good)

But fundamentally, all they do is try to copy and extrapolate decisions made by actual intelligent beings (humans) based on a big pile of data that represents (what are assumed to be) correct decisions.

There is no logic behind them. So-called "AI" does not have the power to form IF/THEN/ELSE logical constructs, because it has no cognition. It is simply a guessing machine, and they should be called that: Guessing machines.

Sure, you could take ten thousand real humans and have them do a hundred thousand Turing Tests, 50% against each other, and 50% against deep-fakes, and try to make a turing tester machine.

It might (initially) perform very well. But it would still be a guessing machine. One of the humans might have said that she caught out the deep fake because it made some statement that wasn't logically consistent with her question. Even if she could input her insight into the analysis, how does an LSTM-RNN solve for that? All it can do is say that "this subject looks somewhat like some of the deepfakes" and it is dead-easy to make a new deepfake that fools it.

GPL legal battle: Vizio told by judge it will have to answer breach-of-contract claims

cyberdemon Silver badge
Big Brother

User Data

It's not just the data. Telescreen manufacturers (such as LG, Sammy, Apple, Amazon etc.) sell the users themselves.

Modern advertising is surveillance-feedback manipulation-as-a-service. It is a kind of state-feedback control system* around each individual user (with an individually adjustable control gain that is set just low enough for the victimsviewers not to notice that they are being actively manipulated) and the nice thing about a telescreen for this is that it is interactive, so makes for a nice low-latency system so the control gains could be turned up further if desired.

Some telescreens even include a camera that *could* be used for gaze tracking and facial sentiment estimation. (hopefully, this is illegal, but technically it is completely feasible and I'm sure it is par for the course in regimes such as the PRC)

Such a goldmine is the user data, that the telescreen itself can be sold at a loss. The manufacturers *definitely* don't want anyone installing their own firmware if they sell the hardware at a loss. Their customers want that even less, because it allows people who don't want to be surveilled to evade surveillance.

Is it wrong to pirate a Netflix show if you pay for a Netflix subscription? Of course it is. Because by doing so, you are depriving Netflix of their surveillance data. They don't make their money from the subscription fees, they make their money from being able to read and influence your thoughts. (and proving to their real customers that they are doing so)

* Applications of Feedback Control in Online Advertising

Arm CPU ran on electricity generated by algae for over six months

cyberdemon Silver badge
Terminator

Re: @Cyberdemon

We have a perfectly good technical solution - it's called nuclear fission.

Unfortunately, some twats in the 60s were terribly interested in using civil nuclear power plants to manufacture weapons, which caused the reputation of nuclear power to become irreperably tarnished. Then in the 80s, we narrowly averted nuclear war.

There ARE nuclear fission designs that are able to consume the world's stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium in a safe way, to produce enormous amounts of cheap energy. But because of the earlier crises, we are so scared of nuclear power that we regulate it into the ground so that it is unbelievably expensive when it should be cheap- and we end up with no new designs for the past 5 decades, and act all surprised when we find that all our nuclear power stations are crumbling, because they were built in the 60s.

If we fail to sustain ourselves with peaceful nuclear fission, then the only option is war (with nuclear weapons, and/or automated genocide machines), as we struggle for the last of the fossil fuel, and the last of the food.

cyberdemon Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: @Cyberdemon

The world population is currently overstretched beyond the planet's means to support it. As a species, we have reached the edge of the petri dish.

Any volunteers to be the first country to starve to death for lack of energy?

No? Didn't think so.. We'll have to draw straws then.

(see icon)

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: Depends...

Meanwhile the silicon PV powered adventure would be happily awaiting your next move. And it costs orders of magnitude less energy to manufacture.

This paper is not much more than a greenwash-machine, so that corporate social responsibility types can pretend that they are saving the planet by installing an algae-powered calculator in the finance office. (meanwhile the A/C is on with the windows open, thus wiping out the algae's efforts a billion times over)

If we want to save the actual planet, we need to drop all the FUD about nuclear power, immediately.

cyberdemon Silver badge
Facepalm

see icon :(

cyberdemon Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: More reason to relocate server farms

If the datacentres are hosting Twitter or Facebook then they are already both "sewerage farms" and server farms.

cyberdemon Silver badge
Holmes

Re: Or..?

Aluminum can also be fairly nasty? Especially in its large-scale production.

I think it would turn out to be fundamentally impossible for these things to provide the energy for their own manufacture, never mind anything else.

cyberdemon Silver badge
Unhappy

If your pond was the size of a lake, with a lake-sized aluminum anode just under its surface, then maybe.

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: Size matters

Er, is it?

The article says it is the size of an AA-battery. It has what look like four very small screws holding it together.

(at least it is for 1 microwatt)

Maybe they could make a 1-milliwatt version in the size of a car battery?

cyberdemon Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: I, for one, welcome our power spewing* algal overlords...

Algae are definitely much less tyrannical, I agree.. (Day of the Triffids scenarios excepted)

But sadly, this kind of technology is very unlikely to displace the wankers at Drax et al, because the power output is just too piffling.

The world needs something of the order of 1TW to satisfy its electricity demands. This cell produces about 1 or 2 microwatts.

For those who struggle with orders of magnitude, the difference between a microwatt and a terawatt is "One Billion Billions". So even if with further development, this experimental tech could become a million times more powerful (unlikely) so that you could get one whole Watt out of it (enough to keep a phone charged 24/7) then we'd still need a Trillion of them (almost a thousand per person) to "power the planet".

And when the Aluminium anode material degrades and dissolves, we'd have one hell of a pollution problem, not to mention the energy cost of mining and refining all that aluminium in the first place.

And then there's problem of the triffids.. who will have become our new tyrants.

* FTFY, see icon

Colocation consolidation: Analysts look at what's driving the feeding frenzy

cyberdemon Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Security?

The first issue that pops into my head is security..

What security measures are in place to stop some neer-do-wells jemmying open the container and running off with your (& your customers') data?

One would hope that the disks are encrypted as a matter of course, but where are the keys stored such that it can still boot unattended? On the TPM maybe?

Microsoft Azure developers targeted by 200-plus data-stealing npm packages

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Re: Aargh!

Interesting re. Black Duck. Not heard of them before.

But IMO, there is no excuse for package repositories like npm or pypi to be hosting binary-only packages in the first place.

If they must host binary packages, then it should be forbidden for the maintainer to upload them in that form - they should be compiled by the repository (after checking for Hex BLOBs in the source) and for any package, it should be possible for an end-user to download-and-compile sources instead of download-and-install binary packages. A bit like `apt-get --build source [package]...`

That of course means that packages must list their build dependencies as well as their runtime dependencies, and those build dependencies should themselves be open-source. That might be a bit much for Microsoft (who now owns npm along with GitHub) to swallow, but they can get bent, as far as I'm concerned.

Pictured: Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way

cyberdemon Silver badge
Paris Hilton

> if you assume light dissipates its energy as it travels, then you get a red-shift.

Er, then how do you explain blue-shift?

"Galaxies in the mirror are closer than they appear" ?

Open-source leaders' reputations as jerks is undeserved

cyberdemon Silver badge
Linux

Giving nvidia the finger

Giving nvidia the finger has obviously worked well as a strategy! They have just relented on their stubborn closed-source BLOB antics. That probably wouldn't have happened without Linus' ranting and raving.

https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=nvidia-open-kernel&num=1

(although, they haven't released it yet. I'm sure when they do, Mr Torvalds will find something inside to rant about)

OpenAI's DALL·E 2 generates AI images that are sometimes biased or NSFW

cyberdemon Silver badge
Terminator

Re: With Folded Hands..

It would probably come up with some article about how a bunch of statistics that were generated from actual reality, appear to reflect actual reality, and, shockingly, not the non-reality that exists inside the frothing bowl of soup that Guardian columnists call a brain, wherein women prefer to do dirty, manual labour intensive jobs, and men prefer to do social, empathy-intensive jobs.

Communication around Heroku security incident dubbed 'train wreck'

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

Salesforce also own Slack btw

Salesforce acquired Slack last year..

A communications "Train Wreck"? I could only imagine how much worse this could have been if Slack were compromised instead of (or as well as) Heroku.

THAT would have been a communications train wreck, not just for salesforce, but for their entire customer base who rely on Slack for their internal communications.

Airbnb will let staff work from anywhere without a pay cut

cyberdemon Silver badge
Mushroom

Where's Lex Luthor when we need him?

It's time to sink California into the Pacific.

Pop!_OS 22.04: New kid on the Ubuntu block starting to show real muscle

cyberdemon Silver badge
Devil

toxic

There are very good reasons to dislike snap and flatpack, and it's not just a case of "the user can turn it off", because the more popular these nasties become, the more software distributors will use them as the only supported means of install..

The way that they package up applications into their own sandboxes a bit like Android, means that the user has much less control and scrutiny over what the app is actually doing.. Apps have extremely limited interaction with the OS and eachother, meaning that the extensibility and flexibility aspect of using Linux is lost.. They pollute the OS's mountpoint list as each snap application makes its own loopback device.

Basically, it's great for proprietary software vendors, but terrible for users and even worse for third-party software developers who want to make extensions or forks to what is supposed to be open-source software.

We should be educating people on how to build software from source, not forcing them to install some containerised crapware and not ask questions about it.

Your ignorant dismissal of [people with strong opinions about software]? being all too common in the Linux world, is sadly all too common in the Windows world...

AWS's Log4j patches blew holes in its own security

cyberdemon Silver badge
Pirate

Java

Write Once, Exploit Everywhere

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