* Posts by tfb

1010 posts • joined 11 Jan 2010

Page:

UK government shakes magic money tree, finds $500m to buy a stake in struggling satellite firm OneWeb

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: Hmm.

I'm sure it will be possible (at least in what passes for their minds) to mandate that only VPNs which have suitably backdoored encryption will be allowed. And when the keys leak and someone compromises all the banks and takes down the financial system, why, that won't be anything to do with them, it will be the filthy criminals fault.

Dominic CummingsThe UK government: not even the smartest people in an empty room.

tfb Silver badge
Big Brother

Re: Hmm.

Have they not yet made VPNs illegal? Because, you know, criminal bad criminal foreign people, use them, right?

UK space firms forced to adjust their models of how the universe works as they lose out on Copernicus contracts

tfb Silver badge
Pirate

I did check the times because I'm not an idiot. It took them 8 hours to write the story (by the way, you can't spell 'story'). As you wrote your comment they were in the process of writing the story, thus entirely invalidating your stupid 'they won't cover it because it has no anti-brexit slant' point: they did, in fact, cover it, because it's an IT story and they're journalists who cover IT stories.

You may not have noticed, but The Register is not a huge 24-hour news organisation employing hundreds of people – they don't (or almost never, I have not checked) publish anything at all at the weekend for instance. It sometimes takes them a while to write things.

I'm sorry that your brain is only small, but I can't help that it is.

tfb Silver badge
Mushroom

Hmm, I wonder what this article is? It seems to be by something called 'The Register'. In fact it's the main story on their front page.

Do you feel like an idiot now? because you are an idiot.

tfb Silver badge

Re: This project is, though

There's a country that does pretty much that: North Korea.

Germany is helping the UK develop its COVID-19 contact-tracing app, says ambassador

tfb Silver badge

I'm talking about after the war, not during it, when America threw huge amounts of money at Germany.

tfb Silver badge
Pirate

Re: The strapline...

I'd like to know what a native speaker gets from it, but the reading I get is 'Germany: all about allies'. If so it's quite clever. (Although I think the word order would better be 'Deutschland, alle über allies', I think the reading is the same either way.)

tfb Silver badge

Re: In the interim, the British government has been forced to adopt human-powered contact tracing

But pensioner who is posting comments on the Register. This makes you, I would guess, untypical.

(I'm not disagreeing with what you say – certainly it is true here that most of the non-socially-distanced groups I have seen were not pensioners by a long way, and I also have no idea who is shopping in supermarkets as we've not been since March – just saying that it's probably wrong to generalise from your situation...)

tfb Silver badge
Terminator

I haven't looked at the code, but all the commit messages and all the README / CHANGELOG &c files are in English. These are people who thought that non-German-speakers might want to inspect the code and contribute. Competent people, in other words. I'd be really surprised if translating the text in the code is hard.

In fact based on this the localisation for English is at least partly done (there appears to be Turkish as well).

Of course we won't use it because GERMAN NOT BRITISH and NOT BRITISH BAD. BETTER TO DIE THAN BE NOT BRITISH. JOLLY GOOD. I have it on direct telepathic evidence that these are the thoughts of our great and noble leader.

tfb Silver badge
Big Brother

Although I'm sure there are other episodes in their history that they're not really facing up to, my experience of living in Germany was that they really were trying hard at facing up to nazi bit and what it meant. It probably helped that by then (early 1990s) most of the people who would have to answer awkward questions were very old, and almost all of them are dead now of course. But they really were trying: there was none of the obfuscatory bullshit that you get in the UK about our history (and no, I'm not saying what we did equates to what the Nazis did, but we also were not always the good guys). So I agree about that.

But I think it's at least arguable that America won the peace, in the sense that they saw what had happened after the first war and where that lead, and decided it definitely was not going to happen this time, throwing resources into Germany to stop it. Whether they did that because they were enlightened or whether they did it because they wanted to keep the pesky commies out I don't know. Probably both.

(And now some troll is going to berate me for being rude about the wonderful EnglishBritish and suggest that if I hate them so much I should leave. And, if I was 28 again, I would, but now I have old relatives, pets, houses, etc.)

Boffins baffled as supergiant star just vanishes – either it partially blew itself apart or quietly turned into a black hole

tfb Silver badge

It would certainly be interesting if it was visible by lensing. It certainly should be in theory and we know where it is so we should be able to look. That's a clever idea I think.

tfb Silver badge

Re: Open a window

Then you see it again.

Unless ... the window is on the other side. Perhaps they know about us and are hiding!

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Pretty sure that thermodynamics says you'll still see it. On the other hand if you're making a Kugelblitz you have to deal with the thermodynamics of that, I suppose. I'd have to think about that: I suspect the only way to do it is to make the sphere be completely reflective inside and then handle the light somehow.

But in the real world you'd see it.

tfb Silver badge

That has the same problem that conservatories have: you fry!

tfb Silver badge
Terminator

Re: Have to love the ESO's naming conventions...

There was a plan, which I think was abandoned in favour of the ELT, for something called OWL: the Overwhelmingly Large Telescope. So yes, the FET is possible ('fiercely enormous telescope' will be the official name perhaps).

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

That's the same as the 'dust' scenario. If it's happened, you still see it, just in IR, so they're planning to look in IR I think. If it's done the direct-collapse thing then there won't be IR as the resulting object is not luminous, unless it starts accreting crud, when it would be very luminous, but not in IR.

I bet everyone is hoping they've seen a direct collapse!

(I think I am using 'direct collapse' wrong here: that's collapse to BH without a star, but I haven't time to edit it.)

Remember that black hole just 1,000 light years from Earth? Scientists queue up to say it may not exist after all

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: It's called rigour

Yes, this is a really good example of that. In particular it's a great counterexample to the kind of all-the-scientists-are-conspiring-to-suppress-x things you hear too often. Here's a claim that would be hugely, hugely cool it it were true and would not show any theories to be false, and a couple of other groups have gone 'OK, let's look really hard at the data ... no, looks to be wrong after all, oh well'.

One does not simply repurpose an entire internet constellation for sat-nav, but UK might have a go anyway

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: "quantum compass technology"

I don't think it's about city-killer nukes or flat-out nuclear war. It's about fighting an enemy who can't kill your satellites (or, if they can, knows that you will then flatten them regardless) and being able to put some tactical weapon on a hardened target with extreme accuracy, or hitting an individual with a missile from far away. The sort of wars that the US has fought quite a lot of, in fact, and the sort of attacks they've done lots of.

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: "quantum compass technology"

It's the high-accuracy stuff in fact I think. That may or may not be available to everyone normally, but in the event of bad things it becomes available only to people with the keys.

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

If the desired use-case is a positioning system and if it doesn't need to be very accurate then, um, we have those already. The whole fucking point of us needing our own system was that we might get locked out of the super-accurate mode of the existing ones.

tfb Silver badge

Not at all: government stupid because government stupid. A Corbyn government would likely have been just as stupid.

tfb Silver badge
Black Helicopters

Re: Full-blown kakistocracy

The UK government: people so stupid they think Dominic Cummings is smart.

After 84 years, Japan's Olympus shutters its camera biz, flogs it to private equity – smartphones are just too good

tfb Silver badge

Re: Sadness...

35mm film was seriously shitty compared to large, or even to medium format. It got better later on but it was never really good, and it's not really good today. (And, again, in case it's not obvious, the last 35mm neg I printed was early March this year: and that's only because of CV19 as I can't get to the darkroom currently). My fairly old phone has significantly better technical image quality than any practical 35mm film (Kodachrome 25 might be better, and some very slow B/W films still might be).

If you've used a pre-M Leica (I have, in fact I own one) you would probably not be saying that LF cameras have worse ergonomics, because the Barnack Leicas are, well, what they are. I use mine with a really lovely 50mm 1:1 finder (made by Voigtländer, aka Cosina, not Leica), as a scale-focus camera: if I had to use its terrible viewfinder and even worse rangefinder I probably would never use it at all. It took them until the M3 to make a camera which was even faintly pleasant to use. I much prefer using my 5x4 to it (but I much prefer using the Minolta CLE to either – although it doesn't compare to the 5x4 really, it's the nicest camera I have ever used).

Anyway my point is: the Leica was this horrid thing with crappy technical image quality ... which, in 1925, no-one even noticed you were using (while today everyone notices if you use a Leica). And people like HCB exploited that to great effect. Today, the equivalent to what the Leica once was ... is a phone.

tfb Silver badge
Terminator

Re: Sadness...

And I quote from a bit of paper I found, dated 1925:

I suspect that my main objection to the Leica after the ridiculous ergonomics of the thing, is the tiny film and lens - mandated by the thickness of the camera, of course - and the addition of auxillary lenses and [...] guesswork bokeh, guesswork depth of field, and the like.

All these things were just as true then as they are now. It didn't matter then, it doesn't matter now.

(And before someone gets all up in arms: I own and regularly use a camera made substantially of wood which is a modern descendent of the cameras that the Leica displaced in many markets.)

tfb Silver badge

Re: Nah

I think you're right. Canon & Sony both make extremely good cameras but also a lot of other things & so can weather the market: Canon will survive because there will continue to be a market for pro DSLRs, Nikon won't survive because we don't need two makers of the things. Sony, well perhaps they won't survive as a camera maker, as I can't think of a compelling reason why they should, but I think they will.

I'd bet at least one micro-4/3 maker will survive as well, but I might be wrong.

Leica also, because there's a market for expensive gadgets for rich people.

CERN puts two new atom-smashers on its shopping list. One to make Higgs Bosons, then a next-gen model six times more energetic than the LHC

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: Ridiculous

I don't know why you think we can't detect antimatter: we can detect it extremely effectively. All you do is press it against some matter and you get a really dramatic amount of energy out. Indeed the wet dream of people who think about rockets is what's called an 'antimatter drive', where you collect a bunch of antimatter and a bunch of matter and use it to drive a rocket. These drives can potentially have specific impulses which are half the speed of light or something like that (the highest possible specific impulse is the speed of light).

If there were significant amounts of antimatter out there we would see it because whenever it came into contact with matter, including the matter that is in the most empty parts of space, there would be really dramatic releases of energy. A universe with any significant quantity antimatter in it would be really bright.

Unfortunately when we look up we see that the universe is not that bright. So we know there is almost no antimatter. And even then we can look for the signature of matter/antimatter annihilations even if they are very rare, and we don't see them. This means that there just isn't much there.

And in fact, you probably are just confused: do you think antimatter is the same as dark matter? Because it's not. Dark matter, if it exists, really is hard to directly detect: if it wasn't we'd have detected it and it's whole point is that it is hard to directly detect or it, you know, wouldn't be dark. Antimatter, which does exist, is very, very easy to detect: we know this because we make the stuff and detect it.

Of course, none of this will dissuade you from your idiot conspiracy theory. Yes, of course it's all being hushed up by, well, by who is it being hushed up by this week? The Masons? The society of golf-club owners? I lose track. Of course it is.

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Ridiculous

Experiments have tentatively shown that antimatter has anti-gravity - it runs away from matter.

They have not. Experiments are being done, but no one has been able to do experiments which give answers to any useful level of precision, or at least they have not published the results yet if they have (here is one fairly recent result).

However it would be absolutely astonishing if antimatter repelled matter gravitationally for two reasons.

Firstly if this were true then general relativity is a dead theory: not just wrong in some limit but completely and utterly wrong in every way. This is because GR describes gravitation in terms of curvature of spacetime: objects moving under gravity follow 'straight lines' – geodesics – in spacetime. Those geodesics are a property of spacetime, which means that antimatter sees the same geodesics that matter does, and moves in the same way, if GR is true. And there are now really a large number of experimental tests of GR, all of which it has passed, slightly depressingly: it would be completely astonishing if it was wrong in this trivial way.

Secondly there are particles which are their own antiparticles, and those particles are deflected by gravity in the way GR predicts them to be: they follow geodesics as GR predicts they should. So that simply makes no sense at all if antimatter feels gravity differently than matter. Those particles, of course, are photons (and the particular geodesics they follow are null geodesics).

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

You may not have noticed but people have in fact spent a lot of effort trying to come up with new theories which match the data and they are still doing that. This has been problematic to put it rather mildly, so other people are also investigating the possibility that the theory is OK but there's missing matter.

This has happened before: energy seemed to be leaking away in beta decay. One group (or one person: Bohr: I don't know who else) proposed that the theories we had were wrong (specifically that energy conservation was statistical for some processes), while another group (Pauli & Fermi) proposed that the energy was leaking away in some unseen particle. 20 years later people found it, and 40 years after that the people who found it won the Nobel prize.

Perhaps this time it will turn out that GR is wrong and there is no missing matter. But until we can come up with some other theory which – matches the data – agrees with GR in all the places where we've tested GR and found out it works well – isn't just some grody hack involving epicycles glued onto GR – we'd be well-advised to explore both possibilities. So that's what we're doing.

Of course, it's easier and more amusing just to snipe at physicists: I realise that.

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: 1 TeV

I know that 146+ TeV is not actually that much energy overall BUT the problem is that all that energy is directed at a very, very, very small space over and over and over again! We have NO CLUE as to how stable space/time actually is and whether we live in a truly STABLE Universe or a merely Metastable one!

Except we do have really good evidence that this is a non-problem. We've detected cosmic rays with energies above 5E19 eV (I think the highest we've seen is ~10^20 eV). This is half a million times more energy than the proposed collider will operate at.

Whatever is making these things has presumably been doing so for a long time, and is almost certainly still doing so (we know that particles with energies this high can't travel large distances on cosmological scales, so they were produced relatively close to us). And the universe is still here.

As a general rule: however extreme the physics we plan on doing, it is safe to assume that somewhere out there there is some natural process which is doing something absurdly more extreme.

tfb Silver badge

My assumption was that people will need to ship solar & wind power long distances, and there is too much to store with any feasible battery system: not for high-energy physics experiments, for general use. You need to ship it long distances because you need to ship it from where it's light and/or windy to where it's dark and/or still (without looking up the details I'm pretty sure we get low-wind, low-temperature weather systems which cover country-sized areas or larger, and you need not to die at night when those happen, or even during the day if you're far enough north). And yes, expensive, and yes, requires a non-fucked-up political situation, and yes, fusion and/or people deciding that fission power is fine (which it is) would resolve the issue. So I'm also assuming fusion won't happen soon enough and fission won't be accepted, and the political situation will not remain fucked up for ever.

In fact, of course, the political situation will remain fucked for ever and we'll just keep burning fossil fuels until most of us die from the consequences. But I like to have some hope.

tfb Silver badge

Re: Ridiculous

Yes I thought that, but if that was true electrons would be magnetic monopoles & they're not. I think they were probably just assembling words they'd heard into something that sounds superficially sciency.

tfb Silver badge
Alien

That's because you don't understand what CERN is for. Which is fair enough because neither does CERN mostly.

If we're going to have a long-term future as a civilisation ('long-term' being more than a lifetime ahead), we need two critical technologies (we need others, but we need these two).

The first is really good batteries. Well, you carry around with you a machine which pretends to be a communication device but is in real life part of a large-scale test and development effort into good batteries. It's unfortunate that this effort is having bad side-effects: social media and the awful consequences of it, such as Trump & the other cartoon characters who have leaked into the world and will probably kill most of us. But battery development is proceeding well.

The second is, unfortunately, something you can't fool people into testing in bulk for you, because it's not very domestic: large-scale superconducting power systems. You need these because you are going to need to ship enough electrical power to run half the world half way around the world, from where the power is made to where it's needed, and you're not doing that unless you have really enormous, really reliable, superconducting power networks.

Well, that's what CERN is: it's a huge test and development environment for production superconducting power systems: by far the biggest in the world. Yes, there's some interesting particle physics strapped onto the side of it, but that's not what it's for: what its for is the development of really large-scale, production superconducting power systems and the people who understand how to build and run them.

What it's for is giving civilisation hope of a future. That is unfortunately not something you can sacrifice, unless you don't want a future.

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Ridiculous

This is not even wrong. But if, as you claim, electrons are made up of pairs of matter and antimatter particles (and a 'monopole' not sure what that is), then, well, you could collide electrons with things and you'd see structure. We do that, a lot, and ... we don't see structure: electrons appear to be pointlike. For some other particles – hadrons, like protons for instance – we do see structure. Not to mention your 'theory' would completely fail to explain the existence of anti-electrons. And anything else, of course: turns out the particle physicists have done both their homework and their experiments.

Grav wave boffins are unsure if they just spotted the smallest black hole or the biggest neutron star seen yet

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: I feel an overwhelming urge to quote Holly!

Gravity doesn't 'escape' the black hole: it's already present around it in the form of the deformation of spacetime.

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Stars between 2 and 5 solar masses

I think that the mass gap is an observational thing rather than a theoretical thing: people spend a lot of time looking at binaries for which one companion is a neutron star or a black hole, and inferring the mass of that object (I think you can infer the mass of neutron stars which are not in binaries as well, but that doesn't work very well for BHs). And what they saw is that there are neutron stars which are lighter than about 2 solar masses, and black holes which are heavier, but they don't see anything in between.

I think that the assumption is that the mass gap isn't real, and LIGO/VIRGO will fill it (and are starting to fill it with this observation).

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: I feel an overwhelming urge to quote Holly!

For a black hole to emit more Hawking radiation than it absorbs from the CMB it would have to have a mass equal or less than the Moon (approximately). No stellar mass or higher black hole would be detectable by Hawking radiation, even in theory.

No longer a planet and left out in the cold, Pluto, it turns out, may have had hot beginnings

tfb Silver badge

Re: It'll be a planet again

The Moon is in orbit around the Earth: not around the Sun.

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Not a planet?

The IAU definition is: is in orbit around the Sun, has sufficient mass to assume hydrostatic equilibrium (a nearly round shape), and has "cleared the neighborhood" around its orbit. Pluto fails the last of these.

If you remove the last requirement then Pluto becomes a planet again ... but so do very many other objects, perhaps a hundred or so. So I think the idea is to keep the number of things we call 'planets' fairly small while having some criteria other than 'Joe says it's a planet' for what a planet is.

But it's just words: Pluto doesn't care what we call it.

With intelligent life in scant supply on Earth, boffins search for technosignatures of civilizations in the galaxy

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: 'this wavelength band' is where you would see sunlight reflected off solar panels

We know that the solar panels we make depend on physics and we have good evidence that the laws of physics don't change in the volumes of space we're searching (and much greater volumes than that in fact).

So we know aliens could make solar panels using the same physics we do. And we know how to look for those. We don't know how they might make other kinds of solar panels, still less how to look for their signature. So we look for the things we may be able to detect and which we know could exist, not for the things that we do not know can exist and do not know how to detect. That's not a stupid approach. It may not (almost certainly will not) find anything, but the alternative certainly has a chance of zero of finding anything.

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: This is mostly pointless

It's searching under lampposts. There are only some things we can look for: if we don't look at all we have a chance of zero of finding something, if we look where we can look we have a chance which is not less than zero and may be greater. And by looking we get to to technology development on the machines we use for looking so related machines can look for other things, like vegetation with more sensitivity.

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Other signs

You are right about energy I think. But nuclear weapons release all that energy in a small fraction of a second so, for that small time, they are quite bright. That was my idea.

The more general idea of looking for detectable corpses of civilisations was just to try and make the window bigger. If (when probably: climate change leads to water and crop shortages leads to squabbles over them leads to escalation leads to nuclear war, say) we destroy ourselves with nuclear weapons in the next century then, perhaps, our civilisation might be detectable while alive for 150 years but the radiation signature of its end for perhaps a few thousand years. I'm making up the numbers though.

(And nuclear weapons are not that bright of course: which is brighter: a supernova seen from the distance of Earth's orbit or a hydrogen bomb pressed against your eyeball? The supernova ... by a factor of a billion (from xkcd).)

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Other signs

Yes, my idea was that if the flashes (or perhaps EMP effects?) from nuclear weapons are detectable over cosmologically large distances then you could watch a huge volume (number of candidates goes up as cube of distance of course). Same argument that makes increases in sensitivity of things like LIGO have such a dramatic effect in the number of events they see.

I think it's implausible though, I agree.

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Other signs

Given the probable outcome of the only civilisation we know about, I wonder whether it might be more useful to look for the signatures of dead civilisations. Perhaps our civilisation might have been detectible by 1900, and if we assume it will be dead by 2200 at the latest then the chance of finding it alive are tiny.

So, for instance, how detectible and characteristic is the result of a nuclear way, say? It might be quite characteristic as there will be lots of decay products from weapons which might be quite distinct from the stuff dying stars spit out. Of course you need to look for long-lived things and they don't emit much, which is why they're long-lived.

Another approach I wondered about is: how bright are the flashes from nuclear weapons? Are they bright enough that you could see them from far enough to expand the search area for planets far enough to make it worth looking for them? Of course they'd also need to be distinct enough to be able to find them (does the double-flash thing from a nuclear weapon help?).

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: Good luck with that

I think the idea is probably to look, first, at the plausible planets we can find which tend to be tidally-locked because they need to be in very tight orbits around very dim stars or we don't find them. Then when we get better at finding planets which really are earthlike we'll have the techniques sorted and we can look at them. This is like all the iterations of LIGO and its predecessors which no-one expected to hear anything: its technology & skill development.

The incumbent President of the United States of America ran now-banned Facebook ads loaded with Nazi references

tfb Silver badge

Re: I'm still not sure how much of this is pulling our leg

Yes, 88 is used by people to mean this: often in usernames used by unpleasant people. But this doesn't mean all occurrences of it mean that (not even in usernames), or that this occurrence did.

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: Spoken like a true FOX news viewer

'One comforting thing about the Trump White House is that you aren't forced to choose between malice and incompetence. It's always both. ' – Gary Kasparov

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: Golly. RED trangles?

It's hard to keep up with the stupidity here (almost the only reliable thing you can say about eugenics and IQ is that people who believe in them are not terribly smart), but

Hmm keep our current infrastructure and constantly recycle our petrol and diesel fuels using sunlight

So, if that was easy, people would be doing it, right. Or is there a conspiracy to stop them? Who runs the conspiracy?

Oh, right, there is no conspiracy, it's not easy, Top Gear is not a reliable source of information on this, and instead of making petrol you can just pump power into batteries and it's better. Who knew?

Health Sec Hancock says UK will use Apple-Google API for virus contact-tracing app after all (even though Apple were right rotters)

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: "we discovered a technical barrier that every other country [...] is also now hitting."

BBC costs money, even if the news output is wonderfully pro-Tory and unquestioning

And yet we have, for instance a lot of things like this, from which I read

The BBC faced a bias row last night after Boris Johnson was confronted by an hostile audience in a Question Time election special. In his half an hour session, the Prime Minister faced unremittingly hostile questions and struggled to get answers in as he was repeatedly heckled.

(Note this was just an early hit from a search for 'boris johnson bbc bias': there are many others: I find those publications too nauseating to look at many, frankly, so I just picked that hit.)

And I'm completely sure that there are entire populations of people who continuously fulminate about the BBC's attitude to brexit, and not all, perhaps not even most, of them are Russian trolls.

So we're in a situation where people on the left (I am mostly one of these people) fulminate against the BBC for right-wing bias, while people on the right fulminate against the BBC for left-wing bias (and actively try to destroy it).

Well, there's an obvious conclusion from that: perhaps it is in fact doing a relatively good job (only relatively: I'm with the original commenter in that it does seem to repeat the government line slightly unthinkingly sometimes) of being unbiased.

tfb Silver badge
Alien

Re: "we discovered a technical barrier that every other country [...] is also now hitting."

BBC news always follows the government line

This would explain why the current government are so keen on dismantling the BBC then, wouldn't it?

Oh, no, it wouldn't explain that at all. Damn.

Looking for a home off-world? Take your pick: Astroboffins estimate there are nearly 6bn Earth-likes in the Milky Way

tfb Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Past & Futures markets!

Yes those stories – the ones with time police or branching universes or ... – those are the interesting ones, the ones which take the trouble to explain away why we can't just bargain FTL communication into sending information into our own past with technology we could, in principle, build now. The ones that just drop FTL travel in to make a better space opera without addressing the consequences can be fun to read but they are just space operas. I'm not against them – I've read many – I just think they're not plausible.

Page:

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY TECH NEWSLETTER

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020