* Posts by heyrick

4636 posts • joined 20 Dec 2009

Canon makes 'all-in-one' printers that refuse to scan when out of ink, lawsuit claims

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Re: RE: nope = ridiculous

"The fax can't be read or copied until you get physical access to that printout."

Assuming there's an actual printout, and that it doesn't just dump the TIFF into an email or file that can be accessed from an embedded server.

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Re: No print? No buy.

I had a Brother DCP something or other that would happily allow monochrome printing if the colours had run out. Even more so, if the black had run out, there was a mode that would try to fake it using the colours.

I think my HP inkjet might also support black only printing, but you need to remove the colour cartridge otherwise it'll keep reporting that it's out of ink.

heyrick Silver badge

Re: No print? No buy.

"Yet, why denying scanning??"

Given my experience with printers, it's probably the startup routine aborts when there's no ink, leaving the machine blinking warning lights and doing nothing else.

It is certainly arguable that ink status should have no effect on scanning, but it's worth noting that it is a multifunction printer, not a multifunction scanner, so if it fails to fully initialise because there's a problem with the printing part then that is understandable if rather stupid.

Give us your biometric data to get your lunch in 5 seconds, UK schools tell children

heyrick Silver badge

Re: Nutshell

"Well, Winston Churchill said that the best investment was putting milk into babies."

And Thatcher took that away, the bitch...

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Re: The only relevant question....

Oh, spam fritters, pilchards in tomato, and whatever the hell angel delight was.

It's a miracle I survived.

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Re: Nutshell

Lose your card, you don't eat. And the replacement card comes out of your pocket money.

I guarantee, it'll only happen a couple of times until the lesson is well learned and cards are treated better than mobile phones.

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Re: Really odd...

Where I went to school, the trouble makers WERE the prefects.

But, yes, when it is managed and not a free for all, everything runs smoothly and electronic recognition crap wouldn't have made any difference.

Think your phone is snooping on you? Hold my beer, says basic physics

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Re: This is mildly terrifying

I think it's the tuning frequency they used to pick up (side effect of how superheterodyne works), in order to tell what channel you were watching. That, plus just looking in the window.

It became a lot harder to use RF detection when households started having multiple televisions and other devices (computers, monitors, printers, satellite receivers, switch mode power supplies...) all throwing out lots of RF interference.

heyrick Silver badge

Re: This is mildly terrifying

I'm not worried. Actually, I'd be rather amused if the guys in the black vans muddy horseboxes found me at all interesting.

Come, say hello, I'll put the kettle on.

What do you mean you gave the boss THAT version of the report? Oh, ****ing ****balls

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"People need to vent the frustrations of the day"

Not really.

When I'm pissed off and fed up, I go home at the end of the day, stroke the cat, and enjoy an extra large tea with a chocolate bar (or two, or three, depending on my anger level).

The best way to manage anger and frustration it to understand the difference between what you fuck up and what other people fuck up. If it was you, try to fix it, do better, etc. If it was other people, then let it go. As long as the paper trial misses you (else you've fucked up too), it's their shitshow, let them own it. Cat, tea, chocolate. Works every time.

heyrick Silver badge

Yeah, some of my software has error traps like that inserted during development.

I tend to take a quick read through the executable in a text editor just to make sure I've caught them all.

heyrick Silver badge

Re: Integrity?

On the plus side, his integrity (and cessation of employment) also mean he never became the guy that got thrown under the bus when they needed someone to pin the blame on, you know, like that hapless Boeing bloke that basically made it so so very easy...

Chinese developers rebel against long working hours with crowdsourced tell-all on employers

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Re: Perhaps we could have a version of this for the west as well

"Just sucking it up is rarely the right answer..."

Depends where you are in the food chain. If you're low enough down (as the majority are), then pointing out that your bosses are treating you like crap has a word - insubordination.

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Happy

This article, then two hours later: Chinese tech minister says he's 'dealt with' 73,000 sites that breached the law.

Coincidence?

Missouri governor demands prosecution of reporter for 'decoding HTML source code' and reporting a data breach

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"and they have to try again after a set period"

Good idea, bit who runs things until then? The people you want to vote out but can't as none of the others are any better?

heyrick Silver badge

Re: The Register - Organ of Record

Because Republicans go the extra mile in order to be award winningly stupid - https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/10/04/gop-proud-of-its-own-stupidity/

LAN traffic can be wirelessly sniffed from cables with $30 setup, says researcher

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"His experimental technique consisted of slowing UDP packet transmissions over the target cable to a very low speed and then transmitting single letters of the alphabet."

Ah, in other words it's demonstrating what every child knows - that electricity though a bit of wire radiates a (small) signal.

Now let's see how effective it is with a broadband router, one person sending secret messages while his kids watch Netflix on two separate devices all with gigabit Ethernet.

[bonus points if his daughter is using a tablet, that's already spewing everything at a known frequency]

All I want for Christmas is a delivery address that a delivery courier can find

heyrick Silver badge

I live in the country, in the back of beyond. My address is quite literally house name, postcode, town.

The number of times I've had big parcel carriers claim to deliver a parcel, then report that my address is missing or incomplete is annoying. To that end, on my Amazon account is a note to the delivery companies (you can add this as special instructions) that names them, tells them that the address is valid and correct, and if they have any doubts just look it up in Google Maps.

I find the smaller carriers are much better in this respect than the big companies that notice the address isn't eight lines long and simply don't bother.

Client-side content scanning as an unworkable, insecure disaster for democracy

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What worries me

Is the idea that an image with minor changes can result in the same hash. Well, what exactly constitutes a "minor" change? When it comes to hashing, either it's the same thing or it isn't (collisions aside). When it comes to images, there's really only the concept of "similarity". You might have noticed when looking for an image on Google or Bing that their suggestions for similar images are pretty good, except for the ones that are often so different you wonder how the hell anything thought it was similar.

Now, let's do a little thought exercise. If I have a picture of a naked twelve year old (think of the children, etc) and I change a couple of pixels, it ought to hash as the same image, right? So I take that and change a couple of different pixels. Same image, yes? How many iterations should I go through in order to have a picture of my cat enjoying snow for the first time have the same hash as a naked child?

heyrick Silver badge

Re: OMG, it it too late already?

The government has already mandated that it's a crime to not hand over passwords on demand.

heyrick Silver badge

Re: OMG, it it too late already?

"or software the conclusions of which I can't challenge quickly, effectively, and at no cost to myself"

Good luck getting a loan, or credit, or a new job. A scary amount of day to day stuff is processed by some black box AI instead of actual people (because people need paid, a computer doesn't). Furthermore it seems from various reports that these things are set to "reject by default", plus there's no knowing that a machine rejected you, no ability to know why, and ultimately no accountability. Computer says No, so piss off (or we'll accept you but at a rate that will screw you).

heyrick Silver badge

Re: Apple has its own agenda

Downvote because there's a big difference between something that a user chooses to share with the world (whether it be a supposedly private copy on a cloud server or spewed onto Facebook) and something that the user keeps private on their own personal device.

Amazon textbook rental service scammed for $1.5m

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Twenty years for stealing some books, five to twenty (depending on state) for felony hit and run. Hmm...

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"or you have low-paid people allowed to give refunds without really understanding the problems"

This. On one order, I got myself a kit of electronic parts (about €30) and my mother some bamboo crochet hooks (about €3).

After a while I contacted them to point out that the crochet hooks never arrived. They refunded...the €30. Okay, thanks, but did anybody actually read the message and the item it was linked to, or did some drone just open the order and hit refund on the most expensive item?

(makes me wonder, does this count as a black mark against the company selling the components? their stuff came in a couple of days, it had nothing to do with them!)

heyrick Silver badge

What's going on at Amazon that it took "losing" fourteen thousand textbooks in a smallish geographical area (without getting payment back) before alarm bells started to ring?

Is everybody scamming them, thus making this fail to be a statistical anomaly?

Computer scientists at University of Edinburgh contemplate courses without 'Alice' and 'Bob'

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Can't use Hanzi, the Chinese government's attitudes towards certain demographics is well known. Can't use Cyrillic for the same reason (Russia). Can't use Kanji/Kana as the Koreans will get annoyed. Can't use Hangul as the Japanese will get annoyed. Can't use Arabic because a bunch of dumb people will kick up a fuss. Can't use Greek because they already own maths. Can't use......

Human history being what it is, there's pretty much nothing (language or names) that can be used that isn't going to alienate somebody or "trigger" some unwanted reaction.

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Re: It's not just the names ...

Looks more like badly written Perl?

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Thumb Up

Re: So, Alice and Bob are "colonial structures" now

I vote for BobbyMcBobFace!

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Just please don't use "they" as a pronoun for a singular person. It's bloody confusing, and requires multiple reads to ascertain that there isn't something (the expected other in "they") missing from the story.

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Andrea, Bailey, Clove... (first is French and Italian, the last is German, they're all gender neutral).

This is assuming western script, of course. It's a little harder with 보연.

German Pirate Party member claims EU plans for a GDPR-compliant Whois v2 will lead to 'doxxing and death lists'

heyrick Silver badge

Re: "He appears not to have read draft article 23"

Indeed, it's quite common if one writes a cheque for over €50 to have to show an identity card or passport, and depending on how well the checkout girl knows the person (as in, don't harass a regular), a lot of the numbers and information from the ID may well be written on the back of the cheque.

Apple warns sideloading iOS apps will ruin everything

heyrick Silver badge

Just because Android allows "sideloading" (aka installing the apps the user chooses) doesn't mean everybody is going to use it wisely or carefully.

Just as people get suckered into handing over the keys to their bank account, others will be suckered to installing malicious apps.

Me? I appreciate it because there are some things not available on Google Play (for starters, none of these app stores offer a way to roll back to an earlier app release if you think the newer one is worse (which usually means 2% new functionality and 20% more objectionable advertising).

heyrick Silver badge

Re: Law of unintended consequences

"the Judge decided that Linux was not an operating system"

What did he think it was, a giant animated penguin?

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that aren't from an official source, such as the Microsoft store

I can't help but feel that that comma is misplaced. Is the Microsoft store an official source or not, because with that comma, it would seem to imply that they're listing the store as an example of a non official source...

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Re: Law of unintended consequences

In sane jurisdictions, it isn't. You cannot be held to any terms and conditions that weren't clearly marked before opening the package.

This may also extend to annul that pre-installation crap you must "agree" to because it's not available until the package has been opened, and many places won't accept returns of opened software packages, but I don't think this specific scenario has actually been tested. Most people just click the Continue button without reading all that legalese crap...

heyrick Silver badge

Re: Law of unintended consequences

How in god's name (or whatever you believe) did we get from sideloading apps to using not shooting people as an example?

Nine floors underground, Oracle's Israel data centre can 'withstand a rocket, a missile or even a car bomb'

heyrick Silver badge

can withstand a rocket direct hit

Tempting fate there.

And, besides, are they entirely certain? If there are on site generators, they'll have exhausts no? What happens if one drops something that goes bang down there?

Instagram is testing feature that tells panicking users the service is broken again

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Re: Seems to me that there's an obvious flaw in this plan

Am I the only one scared by the idea that Johnson has written a letter of last resort?

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Flame

Re: What is wrong with a 404?

"They're not saving lives like nurses"

Who get shit pay, long hours, increasing amounts of abuse for things they have no control over, and damn near zero respect. Back when the pandemic was at its worst, everybody felt good by clapping. How about provisions, supplies, PPE and funding?

They'd probably have less stress and more pay trying to cut it as "influencers", so your point is...?

heyrick Silver badge

Re: What is wrong with a 404?

"30 years ago."

Perhaps this explains that annoying grey haired git that stares out of my mirror. I wish that guy would sod off and leave me in peace.

heyrick Silver badge

Seems to me that there's an obvious flaw in this plan

If the service is really buggered, how will it be able to notify the users?

heyrick Silver badge

Re: What is wrong with a 404?

DNS queries? You're lucky. In my day one had to take the bus to the local library and beg to be allowed to look up the information on the microfiche machine.

Meatballs, Abba, and bork: 3 things Sweden is famous for

heyrick Silver badge

Re: All you need is ...

Came to make the exact same point. If it's just a bunch of adverts, then a Pi can cope with that. Don't need flippin' Windows! That's like using a Claymore mine to get rid of moles...

Apple beat Epic Games 9-1 in court. Now it's appealed the one point it lost

heyrick Silver badge

Re: Freemium game model

"Disposable phones with no software updates."

Downvoted, because some manufacturers actually support their products. Maybe they understand that if they flog you a two-years-out-of-date build of Android and never support it, you probably won't be thinking of them when it comes time to get a newer phone...

"and a huge disparity of development targets"

Funny. I had an iPad Mini back in the days of iOS7, and there were a number of apps that appeared to only work in portrait with rather large icons, as if laid out for an iPhone rather than a tablet. And that's a company with basically two form factors (phone and tablet) and a fairly limited number of models.

Some people put in the effort to support different device types and OS versions. Some...don't.

heyrick Silver badge

Re: Dear Apple...

If the devices command a premium price, you'd expect better than the same shitty supply chain everybody else uses.

Want to support Firefox? Great, you'll have no problem with personalised, sponsored search suggestions then

heyrick Silver badge

Re: It's as if they're designing it to lose market share

Not a word you'll find in a dictionary - this twat misspelled it, then decided that was better exactly because it won't match any known word.

Anyway, if you're trying to brute force the password of a British bloke in a French bank, are you really going to cycle through all of the word lists of all of the languages? Oh, things like Russian would be fun - at work we've had an Oxana, an Oksana, an Oxhana, and an Ocksanna (who may or may not have had an 'h', I don't remember). All the same in Russian, transliterated multiple ways to Latin alphabet. Apply that to the rest of the language (and others...Japanese - Herburn or Wapuro?) and it starts to get a bit infeasible, don't you think?

heyrick Silver badge

Re: It's as if they're designing it to lose market share

"Just because apps on Android do it doesn't make it right, it's highly irritating on there too."

Upvote. Because of recent EU rules on banking, quite often when I buy something from a website I'm asked the switch to the bank app to authorise the purchase. If I do that, I find that upon switching back, the OS unloaded the browser and thus threw away all the order information/basket contents. So I've just authorised a purchase that got "forgotten".

What I have to do is either use my tablet and phone, or wait for the thing to time out and offer to send me a text instead (then wait more until it arrives). It's a pain in the arse, and, I suspect, just a lot of security theatre for no actual benefit (it's the same bank that replaced my longish foreign word password with a five digit PIN because this is "my trusted device" <facepalm emoji>).

How not to train your Dragon: What happens when you teach an AI game sex-abuse stories then blame players

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Re: These are the Beginnings

"The AI can write a book for you."

By regurgitating bits of other books that it can already scanned and read.

I really wish people would stop thinking of AI as some sort of mystical God. It isn't in any way intelligent as it lacks understanding of what it is dealing with. Hence, it's just clever pattern matching that makes suggestions and additions by recognising what you wrote resembles something it saw someplace else, so maybe you're writing the same thing. If you're lucky, it might be able to predict what will happen next by simply detecting and following the trend, much as a child can work out and correctly guess the next in the Fibonacci sequence given the first few numbers and no explanation of what links them.

This article demonstrates, yet again, that AI is not the holy grail of computing. It is, however, much more like the holy grail of bullshit.

heyrick Silver badge

Re: maturity

Minute oneth problem. The article states "two Mormon brothers in Utah". It doesn't strike me as a belief system that would even acknowledge such smuttiness exists until it smacks them in the face, upon which time it'll be necessary to freak out and blame everybody else because "training the AI on porn" is surely some sort of cardinal offence that'll get them excommunicated to the gulag...

Alternative search providers write letter to EU complaining that Google antitrust action achieved diddly-squat

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The problem is more than just Google dominance

I've heard of DuckDuckGo because of the supposed privacy aspects.

I haven't heard of the others. What do they bring to the table? Or are they just lesser offerings that want to sit at the big table?

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