* Posts by Richard Jones 1

1159 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

Page:

Twitter, Reddit and pals super unhappy US visa hopefuls have to declare their online handles to Uncle Sam

Richard Jones 1
Unhappy

I always though it was one of those lovely 'trick' questions. They if they can show some error or lie, they have got you fair and square. Watch out for:

'Such as XXX, TTT, YYY, or any other similar entity.'

Answer No and even if it was only Granny's family pictures, they have got you on a lie and nothing can stop the sky falling.

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Right. Never going there again.

You are doing a bit better than me, I last visited in the early 1990s for work purposes. I'm retired now and apart from not wanting to go back given what it has become under the so-called president, health insurance would be far too much of a financial challenge, even without the damned PRC's coronavirus.

So you really didn't touch the settings at all, huh? Well, this print-out from my secret backup says otherwise

Richard Jones 1

Re: May I recommend rsyslog?

Back in the 1980s we had a number of items that ran outputs 24/7 going to printers. They were 'interesting' rather than ground shaking reports but their value was increased when the data could be assessed and analysed over a period of time. I captured the output to a number of PCs. A howl of protest resulted suggesting that the 'screens on the PCs would burn out too quickly'. A quick back of the envelope job suggested that the costs of paper ran to a free screen every 5 ~6 weeks and I thought that they might just last a bit longer than that. More to the point the data could at last be machine accessed and analysed revealing many previous missed aspects of the reporting machines' operation. In one case a particular component was failing (due to the loss of vacuum in a particular 'supposed to be sealed device'). The overnight data suggested an exponential failure rate that was in danger of degrading daytime performance. That event that would have far outweighed the costs of any paper, PCs or screens.

BoJo buckles: UK govt to cut Huawei 5G kit use 'to zero by 2023' after pressure from Tory MPs, Uncle Sam

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Re: So...

There is no accounting for the brain-dead stupid lot who think (or perhaps cannot think at all) a virus comes out of radios. So they go round threatening cable layers and setting fire to any masts they can find, just to prove how stupid they are.

I am happy never to buy any more Chinese junk until they have cleaned up their foul act; it is called justice.

We won't CU later: New Ofcom broadband proposals mull killing off old copper network

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Re: Spare a copper?

@ Cleaverhouse, while the mobile works outside my house, if I get a call on the hopeless thing, the first thing I have to say is please call the landline.

On the second (landline call) call, the callers says, 'Oh that is much better' and the calls continues.

Sadly, radio is not reliable, it will fail during a problem, e.g. a doctor call. We have been there, done that, got the tee shirt.

What's worse than an annoying internet filter? How about one with a pre-auth remote-command execution hole and there's no patch?

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Re: It wouldn't make the slightest difference.

@ Prst. V.Jeltz, I think you mean a damp squib, a sqib is a sort of firework that should go bang, however, when damp it fails to do anything.

Cisco UCS servers slugged by 'This SSD will self-destruct in 40,000 hours' firmware farrago

Richard Jones 1

Re: Kind of Hertz

I have a single-hole tap with separate flow managers. They operate either as singletons or together to produce a mixed flow. Other sinks also allow either hot, cold or mixed with one handle and no stupid twirling of the controls.

I agree that the isolation valves are worth their weight in anything negotiable for a whole range of reasons. The type of mixer taps you wrote about were no doubt specified as they 'looked good' but were utter crap for the users to 'enjoy'

Baby, I swear it's déjà vu: TalkTalk customers unable to opt out of ISP's ad-jacking DNS – just like six years ago

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Waiting For Tal-Talk

Make sure you have a good supply of books, coffee, and all other refreshment facilities before locking into a wait position for Talk-Talk to come back. Probably your message will take till after the Coronavirus is a distant memory to get through. It is perhaps a shame they do not really know how to run the technical side of the business. Though the rest has not always been that hot either!

Vodafone chief speaks out after 5G conspiracy nuts torch phone mast serving Nightingale Hospital in Brum

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Mother of Your Children

Is something as warped as that seen as a fit and proper person to clean toilet bowls, let alone look after any living thing?

Stop us if you've heard this before: Boeing's working on 737 Max software fixes for autopilot, stabilization bugs

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

@ Giovani Tapinini

Or one that has such a love affair with the ground that it gets lonely when not in very intimate contact?

Capita inks deal with NHS to 'bring back staff': Workers get an hour of training to recruit and vet retired doctors, nurses

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

@Hans 1, just how would anyone get 'simply drafted'? Some retirees will have died or moved onto other addresses, lost their skill or interest. Who would do the drafting, Oh I know we could use nurses and doctors from the NHS as they would know the back ground of those they were trying to draft back in so no need for any messy vetting. Never mind patient care.

Hello, support? What do I click if I want some cash?

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Barclays don't dogfood their IT

I guess that it must be one of those wonderful UK banks that 18 months after the due date still cannot provide confirmation of payee? Until they put their house in order they cannot complain about anyone else's security practices.

Off colour banking in the UK is only for the very strong-willed and hearted.

Huawei to the danger zone: Now Uncle Sam slaps it with 16 charges of racketeering, fraud, money laundering, theft of robot arm and source code

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Since the 1990s...

We ended up banning one of the staff from MCI (USA) for the same fraud efforts back in the 1980s. He went round questioning staff and turning papers over when the staff were not there. We were not impressed.

Things I learned from Y2K (pt 87): How to swap a mainframe for Microsoft Access

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: dBase III?

I used Quick Basic to capture stream data and format it into DBase data base files. Then Clipper to assemble that into a stream of activity reports back in the days before integrated Office suites. In some cases Lotus 123 was invoked, only to draw graphs, which then loaded word-processing for automatically written letters to be sent to international correspondents. Programs were loaded, used and dropped when down returning control to the main program. This was all back in the times of DOS 3 or thereabouts. In fact some PCs were used to take live data from more than one serial port source, process each stream into reports and send them on their merry way to different operational areas. One was a staffing report that analysed work demands and produced draft 24 hour staffing schemes. You could do a lot of work with a 8088 PC working in 640k of memory.

Downloading accounts data out of the IBM mainframe reformatting it and auto-loading it into online customer service systems was fun and far faster than a two person manual team achieved. They took 2 weeks and made errors, the machine brought that down to just over two hours, reporting every odd event it found. Those old systems managed what felt like miracles at the time. Of course, they look like rubbish now.

There are already Chinese components in your pocket – so why fret about 5G gear?

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

The history of UK telecommunications equipment makers s is a well known history of missed chances and following blind avenues. Our equipment was built to GPO standards that largely if not totally ignored the rest of the world's domestic needs. While the standards were robust, they were rearward looking. GEC built up a handsome cash pile from their various enterprises under Weinstock, but perhaps became over concerned at not spending anything. Later cash was splashed about but not to any great benefit and, when it was gone there was not a lot to play with or play for. Plessey joined with GEC in 1988 but it was essentially two corpses aiming for a joint funeral, which then happened after their name change to Marconi. Attempts to purchase UK equipment for use in overseas locations was not a success and when the need moved onto more complex and future facing kit the field was rapidly reducing. For a while the Japanese offered good value, generally reliable kit, but they too were left behind. Ericsson filled the gap, Nokia's hardware division also offered useful kit but the new runners from the Far East, China and Korea were also there. Nortel were once in the market, but marketing wagged the dog rather than producing market leading capabilities they produced unbelievable stories and proposals that suggested they had not read the specifications. Where they had read them, they objected to some deliverables. That was not what most customers wanted to hear. Since the greatest proportion of 5G patents are now held by Chinese companies it is no surprise they have a leading position, demonstrating the presence of high quality brain power coupled with advanced, low cost manufacturing, no doubt in part paid for by profits from all those Chinese made mobiles, such as iPhones and computer parts and idiotic IOT crap that the rest of the world laps up.

You're not Boeing to believe this: Yet another show-stopping software bug found in ill-fated 737 Max airplanes

Richard Jones 1

Re: Isn't THIS why we've got to teach 2nd-graders how to "code", rather than how to think?

@Muscleguy, I am unable to understand the thoughts of your down voter, but they have given no idea of what they were thinking. If someone cannot think enough to understand what they are working on, then the prospect of a solution is reduced possibly to zero. To be able to think a problem through, you need the information pertaining to the problem. The systems analysts should have done the analysis and that they must provide an accurate definition of the problems to be resolved. Safety critical products are in one sense the most challenging, but should all code not be as good as possible? That does take educated, critical thinkers who see and remove as many problems as possible before the systems reach integration and testing. Acceptance testing can never be replaced by best guess previous stages, it is an essential final phase and test plans should ideally combine both critical thinkers and where practical, those with a desire to find faults via intent and those with no clue as to how the final product should work. The latter test the fail-safe, (or not) capabilities of the product.

Microsoft's on Edge and you could be, too: Chromium-based browser exits beta – with teething problems

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: I could also

To date, I thought that Edge was the highway to hell! It was hard go get it to go anywhere else except on edge, was that how it gained its name?

UK data watchdog kicks £280m British Airways and Marriott GDPR fines into legal long grass

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: What's the point?

ICO have a mailing list, perhaps some providing information about the sloppy ways of BA and that Marriott, and advice to avoid might be wise. Bullying bullies should always be fun.

I am on the ICO mailing list but have already noted that both outfits are to be avoided.

Google scolded for depriving the poor of privacy as Chinese malware bundled on phones for hard-up Americans

Richard Jones 1

Re: I feel fortunate

I suspect that he was hinting at the effects of the law of unintended consequences. I am not sure how accurately it applies in this case.

The current hoo-ha might encourage a few not to get suckered into buying such phones, though if they are low-rent items, I am not sure what value, if any the makers were hoping to extract from their users. While I carry my mobile with me much of the time, mostly in the house, a string of medical visits and very rare shopping trips along with details of some short dog walks are unlikely to set anyone's world on fire. It is a lower cost item, from a known make, now nearly 4 years old. My use of it for the internet or email is somewhere below minimal and close to zero. I find it a too painful an experience. Perhaps I could muzzle the problems with suitable software, but there are easier ways for me to enjoy life than fighting with a mobile.

We’ve had enough of your beach-blocking shenanigans, California tells stubborn Sun co-founder: Kiss our lawsuit

Richard Jones 1

Re: He sounds like...

As has been pointed out before cunts are useful. They are the leather sheaths use protect the shaped sharpening stone, (I believe called the prick) used to sharpen harvesting equipment.

In no known sense was the prat to be called useful.

Blame of thrones: Those viral vids of PC monitors going blank when people stand up? Static electricity from chairs

Richard Jones 1

Re: For extra fun ...

I had heard of such problems in the past, but less so recently. Then I suspected that it was down to a complex mix of variables involving a bit of better engineering to be more tolerant, changes of dress styles, perhaps through fashions and perhaps even of personal traits. Once some stories started to circulate everything was put down to e.g. clothing or some such, even though in some memorable cases it was down to faulty fixing of flooring. Above or below a certain weight the floor flexed pinching or releasing cables and so on. The chair issue is very much more specific, though once more I do wonder how the conductivity of clothings, the weight of the user and the way in different people move on and off chairs affects the issue. I am very aware that being (a) heavier than I desire to be and a darned sight more awkward due to spinal issues, my 'technique' or lack of same would involve very different moves than someone lighter and more agile who could just spring off.

As a footnote, while doing factory acceptance testing in about 1980, during the first week I only had to look at the equipment to produce a system failure, later as the bugs were removed I had to approach closer to 'apparently achieve' the same effect. In fact, the problems were caused by faulty punched cards used to program the device.

A Notepad nightmare leaves sysadmin with something totally unprintable

Richard Jones 1
Unhappy

Re: He'd lost several months of work

A slightly different but still cautionary tale. Back in the 1980s in one semi secured area I ran a number of small PCs acting as terminals that collected volumes of process data, reducing it down to key aspects before it this was then aggregated by a 286 based device. Several programs were chained together allowing the machine to draw graphs, write letters embedding the graphs and prepared them for dispatch to international carriers in many countries. A delightfully automatic system that was best left with no human intervention. It was all housed in a walled off area. Then a clerk wanted to complete some work using Lotus 123 which was one of the chained programs on the 286 machine. Seizing his chance he crept in a clutching his floppy disk of data and started up Lotus. A bad move for him; as he existed Lotus it was set up to dump some very specific records to the floppy disk, neatly removing his several months of work and data before replacing it with the latest production run results.

Tesla has a smashing weekend: Model 3 on Autopilot whacks cop cars, Elon's Cybertruck demolishes part of LA

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Unfortunately adaptive cruise control radar doesn't work like that

The Wired article link clearly explains a situation that had me puzzled for a while. It confirms that current systems are only assistance tools. Whether they can develop to allow identifying obstructions appears doubtful. Despite the Musk rambling autonomous vehicles are a pipe dream.

Irish eyes aren't smiling after govt blows €1m on mega-printer too big for parliament's doors

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Re: 3.1 metres in height

The classic error when checking sizes is that things often come in some sort of packing case which adds size above, to the sides and below the basic device measurements. Then you need to have a device to lift and move the darned thing, which at 7.38 metres long is hardly something you could pick up on a standard pallet mover. It might well come as several parts, but given the length would be rather less than bendy to pass through a twisty access route. Clearance sizes need to be thought about very seriously. A survey would have been a wise, make that a very wise move, before the order was inked.

Bon sang! French hospital contracts 6,000 PC-locking ransomware infection

Richard Jones 1
Stop

I Might Be Out Of Step But

I suggest that the French played it right, meaning that in this case Ransom attempts did not pay. Strengthening defences, finding out how it happened and doing more to stop things spreading internally must be in order. Hell it might even mean training staff and building better infrastructure. That might cost a bit off any efficiency savings in the early years, but then payback rather well.

'Big Bang': Great for creating the universe, but not as an approach to IT migration, TSB told

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Had They Never Cut Over A System Before

I suspect that anyone who has ever cut over a system or been remotely involved with a cut over of a system would have been aware that testing is absolutely vital. Not only that but testing the assumptions on which forecasts were built is essential. The stimulus of a new system upon customer demand for services is very often woefully forecast or understood. The only good thing in this case, was that those customers who set out to see what breaks, were spoilt for choice; they did not know that the system was already broken and untested in so many areas that they were bound to have some fun.

So the fraudsters had a party time.

Many years ago I tested what would happen when the demand rush really started. I simulated the effect and listened to fuses blow. When working with a supplier I questioned some 'example data', believing it was for demonstration purposes. Sadly, it was real planning data from an unnamed customer. I predicted the go live failure. Their customer had forecast less than 10% of the actual user impact; ouch.

Can't you hear me knocking? But I installed a smart knocker

Richard Jones 1
Unhappy

Re: There is of course a new approach here

Chineseium sound a bit more upmarket and PC, when I was a lot younger it was called monkey metal. It generally fell apart during use, especially when the tool was a spanner. Plasters needed to be kept handy in the event of an assured need.

High Court dismisses nameless Google Right To Be Forgotten sueball man... yes, again

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: He has also clearly caused significant costs to be incurred by the defendant.

Can Google and the courts apply for their costs against the person?

They sound increasingly like someone many people would not like to have dealing with any aspect of their affairs.

I thought that people who acted like this used to be called a vexatious litigant.

Weird flex but OK... Motorola's comeback is a $1,500 Razr flip-phone with folding 6.2" screen

Richard Jones 1
Happy

@Steve Button

The point of advertising is to sell or upsell an item. The point of revues is to clarify and amplify the advantages or disadvantages of a new item. This Reg revue achieved its aims of clarifying and amplifying the advantages to my satisfaction so well done The Reg. However, the presentation was not enough to overcome the prices disadvantage. As for the car showroom reference, since showrooms are few and far between and since both family cars have done well under 6000 miles, my need to visit car sales points is not so clear. This may not stop me from reading a car revue, though perhaps not of a Ferrari or similar, where both my wife and I would face access issues and for us, reliability counts for far more than image.

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

At £150 perhaps I would consider it, at £1,500 for 'just a mobile', no thank you. I guess I am just not in the target demographic since I am a very marginal user of even my present three-year old Motorola device.

Japanese hotel chain sorry that hackers may have watched guests through bedside robots

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Humans Not Optional?

No human anywhere has ever done anything of this sort, oh wait, it required a human to trigger this issue. Still, it was shoddy programming to allow simple cracking and rotten acceptance testing to allow problems to roam free.

I wonder if the robots enjoyed their illicit viewing.

Mandatory electronic prescriptions was the easy bit in NHS paperless plans

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Today's Experience

I saw the local GP surgery today had immediate instructions for a blood test with a paper form printed out. The pills to be collected from the pharmacy of choice in about half an hour, meanwhile have an urgent blood test plus a paperless x-ray ASAP. Arrived at the hospital 25 minutes later where I was the second person in the phlebotomy queue . Five minutes later blood testing was done, then paperless to the x-ray department, gave my details and had an x-ray. I picked up the pills on the way home, so two our of three transactions were paperless and all done within two hours from the get go. It worked well for me.

Medic! Uncle Sam warns hospitals not to use outdated IPnet freely on their networks

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Re: Make these a federal crime.

I am not sure that the issue is of vendors insisting on using only XP, but I suspect that items with long amortisation lives run past the point of software life expiry. Not only that, but in many cases the parts used to build systems may come from different sources, some of whom are no longer in business. There my well be a future in building or applying special techniques to multi million piles of currency worth devices that are not yet time expired, e.g. NOT connecting them to networks directly? There are ways to link output from a device into other database set-ups that do not rely on last century's level security direct connections.

That said, what is the betting that it was either sloppy email habits or careless browsing that did the damage? Bluntly, the problem lay outside the keyboard interface.

Multitasking is a myth: It means doing lots of things equally badly

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: The English language includes support for lists

You beat me to that point, I thought he was starting a moan about prostate troubles. My relief came a few lines into the article.

As sales crash, Gartner wonders who can rescue the smartphone market ... Aha, it is I! 5G Man!

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Subscriptions Not Really For Me

One of my adult children has started a course, so I decided that it was time to think about upgrading from a mixture of old editions of Office ranging from 2003 through to the modern version we own 2010 to Office 365 for less than £60 for three users, with 3 users still available for other family members. So far it is on 5 machines, all PCs of various ages but none less than 8 years old. I understand that I can buy another year or two at the same price and stack it on. Should our needs reduce than I can and will drop out of the rental market and fall back on whatever is one offer at the time. I receive suggestions that I could even put 365 on mobiles, though that does sound like a nightmare suggestion to me. Having some (any?) reliable mobile signal would be lovely. Currently, I suspect there is better reception in the Gobi Desert than within 30 miles of central London. The last time I watched any 'subscription TV' was after a couple of operations when I was confined to the house, just searching the catalogue nearly drove me nuts. I hated it and never went back, the 'subscription' is an unpaid for add-on, I would never wish to subscribe for real money. Murdock Vision killed that idea for once and for all time.

Using the web on a mobile is not for me, if Ido get a signal, within seconds I find out just how much crap advertisers have that no one would ever want - otherwise why would they push the crap so hard?

Windows 10 May 2019 Update inches toward the 50 per cent uptake as a new build drops

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Using The Tumbleweed Store As a Metric?

I would be interested to know what percentage of Windows 10 machines have much to do with the Store. So we are talking about a percentage of a percentage who are users of the app in question.

US govt watchdog barks at FAA over 737 Max inspectors' lack of qualifications

Richard Jones 1

Re: Battle of the regulators?

While one could hope that the under-resourced might tend to follow the best, experience has taught me that this is not always the way that things go. Sadly, they will usually follow where precedent or external direction points them.

Devonitely not great: Torbay and South Devon NHS declares 'major IT incident'

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: What ?

Well perhaps we should cancel HS2 after the 31st October in favour of something better suited to our UK needs? It started as an EU project, to impose high sped rail across the EU.

Of course a previous government spending did include such as the failed NHS IT project under Blair's lot; or on an unpopular ID card scheme.

Scotland produced their Named Person plan. Then their courts ruled it conflicted with other legislation.

Every government tries and falls foul of objectors. Sometimes it spends all the cash as the Blair-Brown team, remember the famous note from Darling?

Tesco parking app hauled offline after exposing 10s of millions of Automatic Number Plate Recognition images

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Incompetence

They are not yet ready for a pen and paper, or even a slate board on which to draw up a decent, legal migration plan. However, they should get ready for a suitable punishment, hopefully.

Wall Street analyst slashes HP Inc's share rating amid mounting worries over printer supplies declines

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: Sometimes printing IS essential

@JohnFen if I factor in the cost of time finding a 'print shop' then fighting the traffic to get there, the cost of parking and the time spent on the process, even if the printing was free it would still cost me a fortune. My printers are fully depreciated thank you, the youngest must be about 10 years old, so really it is no contest.

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: You think?

We had a (non HP) printer that came with ink and print head combined, replaced the head and all was well, it is 8 years old. My A3 HP is about 15 or more years old, replace the ink and get new print heads I am still happy with that.

The loser is Samsung as our 16-year-old laser printer no longer has OEM supplies, so I now refill the old beast with £10 toner good for some very large number of pages. I also have a Lexmark laser printer not very much used these days, of and another Canon over ten years old and still going strong. So I see HP's point, they have made themselves largely irrelevant to the printer business.

Can you download it to me – in an envelope with a stamp?

Richard Jones 1
Happy

Re: Moved to France

I was in Japan in 1988 ~ 1992 and had no problem at all opening a bank account or a store credit account. Because we were living in Yokohama and using the bank safe deposit box, they asked us to move our account to Yokohama and gave us a gift for agreeing. The Sanwa Bank Snoopy cards had automatic access to our safe deposit box using our bank card to enter. The box was automatically brought to the viewing room. Bank cash machines appeared to belonged to a very strong union. They were not allowed to work nights and remained shut from about 22:00 hours until maybe 06:00 in the morning.

SpaceX didn't move sat out of impending smash doom because it 'didn't see ESA's messages'

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Re: This would be why they are test sats

I have lane assist in my car and a right pain it is; so I turned it off. On good multi lane main roads it is possibly OK, but on patched and ill maintained small country roads it is pointless noise. It responds to the frayed edge of the road, to linear black marks where damage has been cheaply patched with tar covering the join and so on.

Divert the power to the shields. 'I'm givin' her all she's got, Captain!'

Richard Jones 1
FAIL

Re: "power was naturally backed up by a generator that was seated on the roof"

The tanks are vented so that as fuel is drawn out air, or in that case water can go in. Even if fuel was not being drawn out, water going in can be a bad idea, water is just a bit heavier than air.

JACK OF ALL TIRADES: Twitter boss loses account to cunning foul-mouthed pranksters

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: Is this the best you could do?

If they did, would anyone ever be able to tell the difference?

TfL inks £6.5m deal with Sopra Steria to build traffic data-munching and control system

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: AI Traffic lights

I gave you an upvote, though how anything as dumb as the traffic lights could have the smarts to change the damned lights to red every time on approaching them, wherever I go, I will never understand.

UK.gov: Huge mobile masts coming to a grassy hill near you soon

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Re: "4G still remains patchy in large parts of the country"

Yes and with the current move to complicate card payment processes making a functioning mobile essential, having mobile reception cannot come too soon. From the top of a nearby field, (you cannot call it a hill), you can see the taller buildings of central London. However, never a signal on the mobile at home. Speech is impossible 'please use the land line' and without Wi-Fi there is no data service - ever.

Perhaps the banking changes were a move to make cheques more popular as a bill payment method?

Want an ethical smartphone? Fairphone 3 is on the way – but tiny market share suggests few care

Richard Jones 1
WTF?

Cost is the killer

At a price close to 4 times that of my present phone which has a replaceable battery the cost would kill it stone dead for me.

Apple's WebKit techs declare privacy circumvention to be a security issue

Richard Jones 1
Unhappy

Re: Minor Browser?

I am unclear what if any benefit Apple could gain from spreading Safari onto other systems. It would not sell so no money there and no way to raise any user tax of any form either, so surely it would not be worth putting any unpaid work to spread their work.

Chin up, CapitalOne: You may not have been the suspected hacker's only victim. Feds fear 30-plus organizations hit

Richard Jones 1
Unhappy

Re: Like I say, another week...

Or perhaps, maybe it was not us this time, we'll find out later.

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