* Posts by AndrueC

4172 posts • joined 6 Aug 2009

80-characters-per-line limits should be terminal, says Linux kernel chief Linus Torvalds

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: It isn't just code that can be wide

If you're a programmer you can spring for $2000+ in screens, no problem.

That depends who you work for. In 30 years of programming I've never worked anywhere that would spend that kind of money on me. And in any case - what about the rest of the team? £2k+ per seat is a very expensive way to run a team of programmers.

AndrueC Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: I used to feel the same.

Also a lot of older programmers (like me) tend to use larger fonts. Now granted 80 characters is too restrictive but where I work we go with 150 because that's about all I can fit across a single screen. I can only assume that Linus can afford a much higher resolution monitor than me along with a large enough desk to fit it on.

I agree that splitting lines can impact readability somewhat but having parts of a line completely off screen impacts it far more. It does no good for my productivity if I have to scroll both vertically and horizontally to browse through code.

Twitter, Reddit and pals super unhappy US visa hopefuls have to declare their online handles to Uncle Sam

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: Question (not a Merkin)

Yes, no, maybe.

Or, more likely, only when it suits the authorities.

This'll make you feel old: Uni compsci favourite Pascal hits the big five-oh this year

AndrueC Silver badge
Happy

The first 15 years of my programming career were based on Borland's various Pascal versions. From CP/M all they way to D3. But then I moved away to C++ and Borland Builder (thankfully the VCL was accessible so that made life easier). For the last 15 years it's been C# and with luck that'll be the end of it. Another seven years at the most I'm off to play golf full time :)

Thank you Nicklaus and Anders :)

cmd.exe is dead, long live PowerShell: Microsoft leads aged command-line interpreter out into 'maintenance mode'

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: simple shit so much easier with cmd

.\example-script.ps -PowerShellSuckage=doesnot -VeryMuch -ButCanResultInCommandLines=VeryLong

The execution policy helps protect you from scripts that you do not trust. Changing the execution policy might expose you to the security risks described in the about_Execution_Policies help topic at

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=135170. Do you want to change the execution policy?

[Y] Yes [A] Yes to All [N] No [L] No to All [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "N"):

..and safe but sometimes quite annoying.

Record-breaking Aussie boffins send 44.2 terabits a second screaming down 75km of fiber from single chip

AndrueC Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Disgusted

There's more to computer networking than the final mile, you know. Something has to connect head-ends/exchanges together. Something has to carry signals between ISPs. Something has to carry data between countries. Those somethings have to be high capacity because they carry the data being consumed by end-users such as yourself.

If every residential property in the UK had 50Mb/s (which on average it probably does) that's over 140Tb/s. Now as it happens no-one gets or needs 1:1 contention so there's a lot of sharing of bandwidth going on. But still, cables such as these are going to be very useful over the next few years.

It's unlikely they will ever be used to connect to your property but they could end up being used deeper in the network.

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: Only part of the problem

75Km is not very far.

That depends what and where your target application is. In the UK that would probably be enough for local backhaul. Although (at the risk of being quoted forevermore) I struggle to believe we'd ever need that much bandwidth for that.

Microsoft drops a little surprise thank-you gift for sitting through Build: The source for GW-BASIC

AndrueC Silver badge
Happy

Locomotive BASIC was my preference. A very capable language with several optimisations (eg;storing the address of line numbers and variables with the source). BBC Basic was pretty good as well.

Apple, Google begin to spread pro-privacy, batt-friendly coronavirus contact-tracing API for phone apps

AndrueC Silver badge
Happy

Re: re: should be self-isolating

Ale Elatey was a nice chap. Let's see who gets that reference without using Google. :)

Not a bad book that and quite prescient. Although the title of the book could give one pause.

Beer gut-ted: As many as '70 million pints' spoiled during coronavirus pandemic must be destroyed in Britain

AndrueC Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Milk consumption?

Flour does not keep indefinitely long. Especially wheat flour (the really fine, white one).

I thought it was whole grain that doesn't last long because of the oils remaining in the husk. I was under the impression that white flour can last a year more even without refrigeration.

How long does flour last?

Go on, hit Reply All. We dare you. We double dare you. Because Office 365 will defeat your server-slamming ways

AndrueC Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: Why stop there?

Because it's annoying.

> What's wrong with top posting?

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: That sucks!

I'm not following your complaint. If someone is only working half days and being paid accordingly where is the problem? I'm not that far off retirement myself (though I'm not a consultant) and one way my boss could persuade me to stay a couple more years would be a reduction in hours during the summer months precisely so that I could play more golf.

If you're arguing that consultants are overpaid then that's another discussion but being overpaid for half a day's work is actually slightly less aggravating (to others) than being overpaid for a day's work. Similarly I'd rather that a 'knob' only be working for half a day because then they have less time to be a nuisance. Although if they are a 'knob' outside of work then I would rather they stay away from golf courses in their free time :)

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: User education

To be fair I find that a lot of IT support staff are guilty of 'speed reading' as well. I've often wondered if it's laziness, an automated system or ignorance. Perhaps they've learnt that most of the time their guess at what someone is complaining about is correct so there's no need to waste time carefully reading the first message.

But in my experience you mostly only get a thoughtful and accurate response on your follow-up query.

Singapore releases the robot hounds to enforce social distancing in parks

AndrueC Silver badge
Terminator

Good grief that is so creepy. I'm almost beginning to wish we could return to the 1980s.

Apple owes us big time for bungled display-killing cable design in MacBook Pro kit, lawsuit claims

AndrueC Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: Seems to me ..

Of course it is also worth pointing out that EU consumer protection law shields consumers for 6 six years from inbuild faults.

No it doesn't. EU law requires member countries to implement a two year guarantee but that is still subject to various forms of redress. It also allows for the burden of proof to shift from retailer to consumer. For example in the UK if a good fails within six months it is assumed that a fault existed and it's for the retailer to prove otherwise. After that period of time the onus is on the consumer to prove it. In addition the retailer has various forms of redress they can attempt and they are allowed to take fair wear and tear into consideration.

There is no legal requirement for a retailer to replace a hard drive that fails after seven months with a new one. Legally the customer would have to find an expert that would attest to it being an existing fault and then retailer could replace it with a refurb, or make a partial refund. Of course most retailers have more sense than to get embroiled in all that so most will just replace it for free with a new unit but that's going above and beyond what the law requires.

UK law does extend the time in which you can make a claim to six years but that's not a guarantee. It just means you don't have to make a claim immediately and can therefore make one after the fact. In effect it's a statute of limitations.

Serial killer spotted on the night train from Newcastle

AndrueC Silver badge
Joke

I bet you're feeling a bit sheepish now.

O2 be a fly on the wall during BT and Vodafone's video calls: Telefónica's UK biz, Virgin Media officially merge

AndrueC Silver badge
Joke

Re: Branding...

VoMIT ?

UK finds itself almost alone with centralized virus contact-tracing app that probably won't work well, asks for your location, may be illegal

AndrueC Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: Stick to the tech, please

There's another (rather grim) reason why the virus becomes less of a problem over time. It primarily targets 'vulnerable' people and if we do nothing to protect them there will eventually be no vulnerable people left and the mortality rate drops to almost zero.

That has to be worst possible outcome but it's the ultimate end game if we fail at everything else. We lose 5% of the population and the surviving 95% are safe. Helluva price to pay though.

The Great British anti-5G fruitcake Bakeoff: Group hugs, no guns, and David Icke

AndrueC Silver badge
Happy

Re: Haircuts

I cut my own hair and have done for years. Does that make you hate me?

Britain has no idea how close it came to ATMs flooding the streets with free money thanks to some crap code, 1970s style

AndrueC Silver badge
Happy

Re: Test, test and test again...

In my defence when you're writing data recovery tools for the engineers that are using them you can't always afford time for thorough testing. Most customers want their data back yesterday so you bodge up a fix for whatever is blocking that particular recovery and worry about the code later. But then there's a dual nature of the job where sometimes you had to drop the programming you were in the middle of and actually recover some data. In the early days we even had to answer the phone and give quotations to customers. Can you say 'context switch'?

I think on balance looking back over the 15 years I did that (15 years during which the main tools were ported from DOS, to Win16 then to Win32 using both Pascal and C++) we did a damn good job.

Happy days but history now.

AndrueC Silver badge
Facepalm

Many years ago I was a data recovery engineer. I was also responsible for writing and maintaining our data recovery tools. Every now and again the hardware engineers would whine about the time it was taking to image hard drives. Sometimes I'd offer sympathy and agree to investigate. It was a way to avoid real work since I could usually blame the network or the (NetWare) servers. Other times I'd just shrug it off and do something more important.

Anyway this one time the engineers were adamant things had suddenly taken a turn for the worse. So there was a department-wide investigation. The network was checked and found to be fine. The servers seemed okay as well. Eventually we gave up and forgot about it for a week or two. Then while I was investigating another problem I happened across the main I/O loop for our disk imager. And there I found a debug statement, left in while investigating our 'non-BIOS' disk reading. This was code that used ATA to talk directly to the disk. We needed that because sometimes the BIOS just couldn't handle the state the drive was in and occasionally we took in a drive so large that the BIOS couldn't access it all. Anyway this code could be a bit temperamental and it often came down to timing.

Hence the debug statement I'd inadvertently left in. The I/O loop read 64kiB of data then wrote it out. Then it waited 10ms before going round for more data. I toyed with the idea of pretending I'd discovered a hitherto unknown way to improve I/O but we were a friendly team so I 'fessed up. Sometimes it does you good to laugh even if it makes you look like a chump.

Smartphone shipments plummet in Q1 as users, er, lock down their spending

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

My phone already does everything I need it to. More than I need it to. Has been that way for several years now. I didn't need 4G and I don't need 5G. I only replace them when the battery starts to fail. Guess we know why manufacturers don't make it easy to replace batteries any longer.

Browse mode: We're not goofing off on the Sidebar of Shame and online shopping sites, says UK's Ministry of Defence

AndrueC Silver badge
Stop

Re: world's biggest English-language news website

world's biggest English-language news website

If ever there was a need for a sad face photograph, this is it.

Atlassian to offensively price itself through the post-pandemic patch

AndrueC Silver badge
Unhappy

Will it keep hiring enthusiastic young talent then firing all of them apart from one lucky person after a month?

Happened to a young relative of mine and I think it's a shitty way to vet new talent.

Web pages a little too style over substance? Behold the Windows 98 CSS file

AndrueC Silver badge
Flame

While we're dissing Microsoft UIs can I also throw in a moan about focus stealing? Surely the one thing any GUI should do is respect which control the user is interacting with? Windows is a multi-tasking OS and if one application is a little tardy in responding we should be able to switch to another application and use that without the tardy application suddenly shoving itself in our face and demanding our attention.

Hands up anyone who hasn't accidentally typed half a password in plain text into an application that suddenly thrust itself in front of another application's log on dialog?

<rant>

Oh and (a bit specialist this one) FFS guys. Trying to make Visual Studio start up quicker by deferring tasks is pointless. Yes, it renders immediately, but there's then damn' all you can do with it anyway. It will occasionally respond to a click or a key press and you think you're finally on your way only for it to stall as yet another 'startup' process wakes and blocks the UI thread. It is not clever, it is bloody irritating. It would be far better if it just displayed a 'Please wait, I'm initialising' dialog so that it at least I wouldn't keep having to try and do stuff on the off-chance it was finally ready.

Oh and it focus steals as well. It steals the focus only for you to discover that it's not even ready to respond. Sometimes it's so busy at startup that it steals the focus and then you can't get back to the application you were trying to use.

</rant>.

Forget tabs – the new war is commas versus spaces: Web heads urged by browser devs to embrace modern CSS

AndrueC Silver badge
Childcatcher

Re: "optional and reorderable"

I remember when left-clicking once on an edit box that didn't have the focus just focused it and moved the cursor. Double clicking selected all the text. These days single clicking selects everything and you have to click again to position the cursor where you want it.

And all these flat buttons - often without any indication of whether they are enabled or not.

And a lot of UI 'designers' apparently have no knowledge of what an accelerator key is nor what an accept or cancel key is.

The original rules made sense. Then arty-farty types decided they wanted to 'differentiate' their product and that it would be 'cool' to look different.

Cisco UCS servers slugged by 'This SSD will self-destruct in 40,000 hours' firmware farrago

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: 'ordered' by one of our Cisco routers

how the hell did it know its postal delivery address?

I assume that it was registered with Cisco by our corporate IT department when they installed it. All that then needs to happen is that it notifies Cisco HQ of the failure and their support systems look its serial number up in a database and arrange for the fan to be sent out to the registered address.

It's technically possible Cisco offers monitoring services that will raise the alarm. I just can't immediately find any specific service that includes ordering spare parts. So maybe it was our IT department sending it out but usually they came and visited us (anything to get out of London for the day, lol).

Edit: I have found this document.

"Devices equipped with Smart Call Home technology can be enabled to continuously monitor their own health. Once enabled, this feature can notify you of potential issues using a secure, personalized web portal that contains messages, detailed diagnostics, and recommendations. If a serious problem arises, Smart Call Home can automatically generate a service request with Cisco TAC that is routed to the right team for your particular problem"

It doesn't specifically mention sending out spare parts but it shows how they have the technology to know that 'Router 3 in Bucknell has a failed fan" from there to "Send a replacement out" isn't far :)

AndrueC Silver badge
Thumb Up

Had a similar issue with the first SSD I bought (think it was a Kingston unit though). After three months it would shutdown. After power cycling it would run for an hour then shut down again if I remember correctly. So I went to the manufacturer's website and discovered that a firmware fix had been made available the day before. Apparently some counter was rolling over and originally only had enough bits to count three months worth of hours.

On the Cisco front I remember a few years back when I was working as part of a small team in a small office. The office was actually a converted barn but because we were a satellite office of a large multi-national we had quite a decent server room. Still - for the most part we just got on with some programming and a bit of hardware poking and ignored anything what happened in the server room.

Then one day a small packet arrived. In itself not unusual - we often had personal stuff delivered and even occasionally work-related hardware gubbins. But on opening it we discovered a small fan. No-one knew anything about it. So we checked the paperwork that came with it and discovered that it had been 'ordered' by one of our Cisco routers. It turned out that one of its fans had failed and apparently instead of just letting itself get all hot and bothered (we'd never have noticed until it finally went into melt down) it ordered a replacement part. I have to admit to being somewhat impressed by that.

European programmers take an extended lunch break as GitHub goes TITSUP* again

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: Did not notice

I noticed when I tried to create a PR. So I notified the rest of the team and switched to a different task for an hour. By the time I returned Github was back. No source code was harmed or lost.

There are always two sides to every story – except this one, which is just a big billboard borked in all directions

AndrueC Silver badge
Happy

Re: "even in these interesting times, artisanal dough prodding will endure"

Aye, plenty of bog roll but there weren't any eggs tonight (I didn't want any but noticed the shelf was empty). I can only assume everyone is spending their lock down baking cakes and/or bread. I do have enough wholemeal flour to make a couple of loaves but whilst you certainly can make wholemeal pizza base it detracts from the taste and it can be tricky to get the water content right.

On the plus side there was no queuing tonight and it was fairly empty so I was in and out in fifteen minutes.

AndrueC Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: "even in these interesting times, artisanal dough prodding will endure"

Icon: need to bake soon, almost out of bread.

If you can find any bread flour. I've been having to buy store bread for the last month because it seems like suddenly every other bugger wants to bake their own bread. Rather unfortunately it was my last failed Tesco order that was going to replenish my own stocks so I was caught on the hop.

After this last weekend I'll now have to buy store pizzas as well. I wonder if they've finally worked out how to mass produce pizzas whose bases don't immediately turn into dry cardboard when cooked?

Is this an ASP.NET Core I see before me? Where to next for Microsoft's confusing web framework...

AndrueC Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Confusing for those that dont .NET

Did you miss the bit when I said it hadn't been released yet? I mean, sure, we could ship it (hopefully this year) still targeting .NET 4.5 but it's hardly an auspicious beginning for an application suite with an expected life time of a decade. It also doesn't help our team if we prevent them using new technology while working on new developments. Would you be happy to work on a new project that was targeting .NET 4.5 as part of a team where no-one had any practical knowledge of Core?

The project is still under development so we want to be using the latest tools and latest framework. We also want our team members to be up to date with developments so that we remain competitive and retain staff.

Our existing applications, sure, they pretty much stay where they are although we had to upgrade them to .NET 4.7 in order to get TLS1.2.

AndrueC Silver badge
Boffin

Re: At its best, it is like magic

Yup, I call it implicit code (or sometimes automagical). It can save a huge amount of time and effort but one day when you least expect it your magical black box stops working and then good luck trying to fix it. Maybe you get an arcane error message but mostly you just have to hope someone else has encountered the problem and has a fix. Failing that you can only hack around in the hope of stumbling onto the magic incantation that gets it all working again.

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: Confusing for those that dont .NET

.NET Core (which is now just .NET) is the way to go for all new developments

It must be nice to work somewhere that you only have to think about new developments. During the lifetime of our current project (not yet released after three years) there have been two significant changes to .NET and we've had to port our solutions twice in order to stay current - we've still yet to move some projects over to .NET Core. I've been developing for .NET for nearly 15 years now and it seems to get more confusing every year.

Not just the number of framework versions that you have to understand (and the various bodges needed over the years - remember the BCL bodge for async/await?) but also the different ways that the tools work (references are handled differently for .NET Core). How many iterations of Nuget package managing has VS gone through now? Is it four, five?

If .NET Core hangs around long enough it will start to simplify things but those of us with several years of projects to support are going to have to keep struggling through the confusion. I don't say it's a huge problem but trying to pretend that it isn't a problem is hiding an uncomfortable truth.

Cloudflare outage caused by techie pulling out the wrong cables

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: Cables with labels on

Much like comments in source code. That's why I prefer to use good identifier naming to indicate what the code is doing. The compiler doesn't care about comments so won't ever alert you if they become out of date. Plus in my experience most programmers don't read comments anyway.

Sadly I don't think there's any equivalent for wiring.

BepiColombo probe swings by Earth on way to Mercury – the Solar System's must-visit coronavirus-free resort

AndrueC Silver badge
Thumb Up

“[The] eclipse phase was the most delicate part of the flyby, with the spacecraft passing through the shadow of our planet and not receiving any direct sunlight for the first time after launch,” said Elsa Montagnon, ESA's BepiColombo Spacecraft Operations Manager.

Good news! The probe will soon be receiving a great deal of sunlight on its panels :)

Ransomware scumbags leak Boeing, Lockheed Martin, SpaceX documents after contractor refuses to pay

AndrueC Silver badge
Stop

It also sends a useful message to these scum: Don't bother attacking us again - you're just wasting your time and risking your freedom for nothing.

If everyone did that in such situations (and including kidnappings) the crimes would be far less common. Every time someone gives in to extortion they propagate the evil practice.

Revenues up, taxes down: Google UK reports its slice of the Chocolate Factory pie

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: why the fuck should the big boys have free reign

That's just sport though, I specifically wrote 'leisure activities'. Although Golf is a sport it's not particularly physical and I view it more as 'something to do that takes half a day'.

But my main point, really, is that it's not something that only the well-to-do play. It's within reach of almost anyone who has a job. The idea that only captains of industry and politicians play it is old fashioned. And having many years experience I can say that very few people talk about their jobs while they are playing. Quite the opposite - golf is a break from their jobs (and their families) - and they'd rather talk about almost anything else.

AndrueC Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: why the fuck should the big boys have free reign

It irks me to see Golf portrayed like that. The vast majority of golfers (probably 95% at least) are 'working Joes' like me. For most golfers it is a hobby no different to any other outdoor hobby. Most golf courses are open to the public and most golfers aren't even members of a club (you only need membership if you want an official handicap or if you play a lot and can save money on visitors fees).

It's not even particularly expensive these days - it costs less than £200 to get the kit and at 95% of courses anyone can play for around £30. There's not many other leisure activities where you can get 4 hours of fun(*) for only £30.

The situation isn't quite the same over in the US of A - they have a lot of exclusive country club style venues - but here in the home of golf it's a sport for anyone with enough time. And from talking on forums even in the USofA it's not particularly exclusive, you're just slightly more limited in the courses you can play or might find overcrowding to be an issue.

(*)Fun isn't always the right term. Cycling has hills, football has mud, golf has bad shots :)

Leaving Las Vegas... for good? IT industry conference circuit won't look the same on other side of COVID-19 pandemic

AndrueC Silver badge
Happy

Re: "Why the heck did we buy loads of desktop PCs"

We just carried our desktops to our cars and took them home. A couple of people had to take their monitors as well but being programmers most of us already had everything else we needed. We don't even need to connect to the VPN very often because most of what we want is in the cloud.

20 years later, Microsoft's still hammerin' Xamarin: Bunch of improvements on the way for cross-platform coding toolset

AndrueC Silver badge
Boffin

Oh and IoC and interfaces are your friend. For instance we have an IPlatformSpecificHelper which offers methods for doing things that every platform does (eg; getting a Font, creating a bitmap) but does differently. At the heart is AutoFac and each platform has its own registration module which supplies the classes that actually implement the interfaces. So Wpf applications will be using WpfSpecificHelper and mobile apps use XamarinSpecificHelper. Since they both implement the above interface they can be passed into platform common code with impunity. In fact we use this technique extensively to allow us to separate functionality by module by assembly thus aiding in general code portability across our projects.

A related trick is to have an interface for platform specific objects eg; IPlatformSpecificFont. Then you use platform specific converters to return the actual object. I find that better than just using 'object' everywhere.

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: Animation and spritekit?

Actually something else I'd recommend is SyncFusion. They offer a very powerful set of Xamarin components. The only fly in the ointment there for us that we were already using DevExpress components on WPF so now we are paying for two third party frameworks.

Unfortunately it seems that DevExpress have given up supporting Xamarin.

AndrueC Silver badge
Happy

For 'day to day' development you can mostly ignore the mobile stuff. Anything UI related involves a bit of extra thought but here's what we've done. We have split our view models into two parts. A common service class that contains as much of the VM logic as possible. These are then injected into 'target' specific view models where target is either 'desktop' or 'mobile', each of these VMs is as 'lite' as possible. There's a little bit of ugly if you want to bind to a property that is implemented on the service but you can hook into the notification event and in effect chain it:

_commonService.RaisePropertyChangedNotification += OnCommonPropChangedNotification;

..

private void OnCommonPropChangedNotification(object sender, e) =>

RaisePropertyChanged(e.PropertyName);

Then your lite property just returns the common property:

public Whatever Wibble{get =>_commonService.Wibble; set=>_commonService.Wibble=value;}

This does require that you keep the property names the same across classes which is a weak area but that's what unit tests are for I suppose.

Other than that the only biggie we ran into was the fundamental difference between how Wpf applications bootstrap and run and how mobile applications do it. Eg; Android has Activities. That pain is probably unavoidable, it's the nature of mobile.

My conclusions: If you have an existing Wpf team looking to create or migrate to a cross platform solution I think Xamarin is probably the least painful path. Now if you were taking on a whole new mobile only project it might be different. If you have no prior mobile experience then you should look at everything and I don't think C# is even a sensible choice for that.

AndrueC Silver badge
Happy

It's been improving steadily. I suspect from your description that you actually it used it over two years ago. That's when I started using it and I agree that it was a pain. The tooling was chronic - ten minutes for a build and sometimes the build just hung or failed for no reason.

But since about summer last year it's become not a lot worse than Wpf development. Having to build on a Mac is still a pain and some debugger features aren't implemented or can be a bit fickle but it's nothing an experienced software developer should be shocked about.

I'd say that any Wpf development team considering a cross-platform product would be well advised to look at Xamarin. We support WPF, Android and iOS and 95% of our code is shared between projects. The only thing we have to do for the mobile versions is a bit of UI tweaking and occasionally inject platform specific services.

Internet samurai says he'll sell 14,700,000 IPv4 addresses worth $300m-plus, plow it all into Asia-Pacific connectivity

AndrueC Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Civilian note

Yes, hmmm, RBLs might not work very well for IPv6 addresses

Assumptions don't work well for IT either ;)

It's rejecting based on the recipient. 'be3b1ce3b' isn't even close to the required format so the message is rejected immediately. My mail server has very strict recipient rules because I use a DEA system. That recipient name isn't even close to acceptable.

The only blacklisting my server does is on security violations. There are no IPv6 addresses in the list at the moment but I don't know if that's because it doesn't store them or because there have been no attacks from IPv6 addresses.

AndrueC Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Civilian note

is there a problem with SMTP over IPv6 that I don't know about?

None whatsoever. My personal mail server supports it just fine. You can even get spam using it :)

22/3/2020 11:38:24.541 - Client:2001:EE0:4141:B State:RcptTo Action:Reject Rule:Reject general crap Size:129413 MAILFROM:[email protected] Recipients:([email protected])

Freed from the office, home workers roam sunlit uplands of IPv6... 2 metres apart

AndrueC Silver badge
FAIL

Re: IPv6 by default

Yup. A couple of years ago they rebuilt their core network but the only impact it had on their IPv6 offering was to kill off the beta program because it wasn't compatible with the new network. That was when I finally left. I went back to an ISP that had been running dual-stack for over ten years.

Forget about those pesky closures, Windows 10 has an important message for you

AndrueC Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: "not giving Windows 10 enough headroom"

Oh iOS can be just as bad..possibly worse. I have a Mac Mini on my desk (purely for building Xamarin apps I hasten to add). Every now and then it will refuse to build or to apply an XCode update because it doesn't have enough space. When I investigate what is using all the space I find out that it's 'System'.

Great.

Tech won't save you from lockdown disaster: How to manage family and free time while working from home

AndrueC Silver badge
Meh

Re: Bread

Good point. I only have one bag left. Luckily since I'm working at home I probably wouldn't make sarnies anyway but it's the one area where my grocery buying has let me down.

AndrueC Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Bread

Or if you're lazy just buy a bread machine. I did that several years ago and have been using it a couple of times a week ever since. Not bought shop bread in a long time. My favourite recipe is 200g each of white and wholemeal flour, olive oil, salt, water and chia seeds. Stick all the ingredients in and set the timer before going to work in the morning. Return home to smell of baking bread :)

If I was buying a bread machine again (current one was bought in 2012 and still going strong) I'd go for the version that has a nut/fruit dispenser but I've done fine without.

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