* Posts by Charles 9

16111 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

It is with a heavy heart that we must tell you America's richest continue to pay not quite as much tax as you do

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Hang on

"Do I think that a solution exists? I am convinced of it."

I'm convinced there isn't. Because like I said, with enough influence and enough meta, everything is fungible. This includes the limits of what is fungible.

Reagan once said the ten words no one wants to hear are, "I'm from the government, and I'm here to help you." I can think of seven that are even worse for civilization in general: "I can make it all go away..."

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Hang on

Like I said, this is where it gets meta. Meta means changing what is "income," "this year," or even "this rate." With enough influence, everything is fungible.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Hang on

The problem behind the problem is the human condition. People are going to cheat; plain and simple. Worse, the problem gets meta, and people become good at cheating at cheating (think cheating to get away with cheating). And because cheating can get meta, some lowlifes can get pretty ingenious about cheating, using as many meta levels as needed to get away with it.

Sometimes, that's the problem with "Keep It Simple, Stupid." Simple sometimes isn't very adaptable. Thus why most gas-guzzling cars don't use Wenkel engines. Wenkels are powerful and simple as far as gasoline engines go, but they're not the most efficient in an age where that is increasingly an issue. Similarly, people seem to find all sorts of ways around tax codes (and at a meta level, getting the tax codes changed in their favor, too).

If we want to solve the problem long-term, we're probably going to need a better breed of human first.

Charles 9 Silver badge

And land grabs are inevitable because they're one of the most reliable investments in the world. We always need it, and there's never enough; ergo, permanent seller's market.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Death to the rich!

Not necessarily. That's what accountants get paid to do, plus there are always third party countries (say Singapore) that provide a cover for both ends and don't care much about what happens.

One unavoidable thing about being very, very rich is that it opens up a lot of doors, especially when one starts opening up that very big checkbook...

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Death to the rich!

Then they'll just move elsewhere. What good is a high tax rate if all of a person's wealth and income is declared in, say, the Cayman Islands, which has the unassailable advantage of low upkeep costs and thus little need for lots of tax revenues?

The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The best time to build a semiconductor foundry is 5 years ago

Charles 9 Silver badge

Because a lot of times foreign sovereignty gets in the way...

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Somebody else's problem applied by world business

"...how many times do we have to keep bailing big business out when it would be cheaper to cut the head off the monster and return control to someone who sees beyond todays profits..."

Is it? What if it's the ONLY supplier left? What do you tell the unfortunate cogs who have nowhere else to get their essentials because the last grocer in a 10-mile radius just shut down forever?

Charles 9 Silver badge

Perhaps the adages of the titles can be generalized thus:

"The best time to do anything is way too long before you even realize you actually need to do it."

Or...

"The only way to win in this world is to be lucky...or psychic..."

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Wise Words Worth Repeating

It's a dilemma, really. How much slack is enough? Too little and you pay in lost sales when a hiccup hits. Too much and you pay in storage costs and get undercut, and the sweet spot keeps moving. About the only way to succeed is to be psychic.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Perfectly well

Coke got jealous of Pepsi and tried to mimic them. Backpedaled pretty quickly, IIRC.

Why are some of the most productive electronic devices still using keyboards and text consoles?

Ever heard of the adage, "If it ain't broken, don't fix it"?

Charles 9 Silver badge

But there's a catch. In most cases, it's hard to tell if it's better to sell a few at a king's ransom or a crapload for peanuts in terms of the bottom line. Unless you're talking something like a Veblen good (which grows more valuable with rarity), what you want is usually a middle ground: a sweet spot where the right quantity at the right price gets you the most return.

How do we combat mass global misinformation? How about making the internet a little harder to use

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: It used to be called propaganda

"Remember when Tanzania tried their COVID test kits on a goat and piece of fruit and the tests came back positive? Remember the stories where medical personnel submitted unused test swabs that then tested positive?"

No, and no.

And you have to wonder if stories like these are perhaps reverse propaganda: scare tactics meant to stir panic and distrust. I mean, how long has it been since we entered a DTA world?

An anti-drone system that sneezes targets to death? Would that be a DARPA project? You betcha

Charles 9 Silver badge

The possible scenario here is a fire-and-forget drone that is able to fly autonomously without further direction. That's a tough one to beat without some direct method because at that point it's self-contained and can't otherwise be redirected. A directed drone will need a live link which can be jammed and/or tracked.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Because this was just a few years after the Cuban Missile Crisis. The fear wasn't so much of Vietnamese death but Soviet deaths that could be considered provocation. That's also why the whole Rules of Engagement thing and why Hanoi was off limits: they didn't want to risk triggering World War III.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Loitering/multiple targets?

Unfortunately, physics gets in the way of umbrellas over the props as they need good airflow both above and below to get the hovering business right.

Plus, as others have noted, what happens if the drones are programmed to fail deadly and just go off if they're destined to hit the deck because they care less about collateral damage?

PrivacyMic looks to keep your home smart without Google, Alexa, Siri and pals listening in

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Another to distrust

Thing is, many people just don't care...and then bring these spy devices into your own world without your knowledge (and soon, ability to control thanks to new whispernet technologies)...

Deadline draws near to avoid auto-joining Amazon's mesh network Sidewalk

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Update

Amazon's out will be that they're not PAYING for it. Otherwise, a family using one plan would be subleasing between the actual subscriber and the other residents or family members.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: I wonder if...

And what's to stop your friends from bringing theirs in without your knowledge? And who complain about your poor signal quality if you try to cage your place?

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Tapping in

Good luck. You'll probably brick the TV and void the warranty on tampering grounds.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Then the sneaks will disguise their devices as belonging to other people. It's cat and mouse.

As for cyberstalking, whatever happened to burner phones concealed in the car?

Wyoming powers ahead with Bill Gates-backed sodium-cooled nuclear generation plant

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: The reactor is the right size

Opinions about the long term RoI of nuclear versus renewable seem to be up for debate.

Possible counterargument: https://www.spglobal.com/platts/en/market-insights/latest-news/electric-power/031521-miscalculated-levelized-cost-of-electricity-data-has-overvalued-power-plants-study

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: You know what

Ever thought that the military might have more than enough fissile bomb material for its needs? There IS such a thing as "too much of a good thing." If they have enough, having more just costs more to keep under watch so that unwanted parties don't steal some and use it to make their own weapons.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Missing the point

They're both issues. Sodium is a tricky thing, especially at high temperatures. Most of the problems with research into sodium-cooled reactors stemmed from leaks. Try looking up the "Sodium Reactor Experiment" and "Monju"

As for the traveling wave concept, it seems fiendishly complicated, not to mention lacking in critical research. RoI on it seems sketchy at best, and research into long-term RoI for power plants in general suggest the numbers could be excessively rose-tinted.

FYI: Today's computer chips are so advanced, they are more 'mercurial' than precise – and here's the proof

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: CPU lockstep processing

Then we get the scenario when two of them agree but on the wrong answer...

Google's FLoC flies into headwinds as internet ad industry braces for instability

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: It's imperative that the new technology ... allows for legally compliant data-sharing

It mostly depends on what's at stake. Casinos deal with lots of cash and are at risk for high-stakes heists and robberies, so they put in accordingly. Still, don't count out the top-tier retailers like Walmart and Target. They have the dosh to use better gear and better stuff on top of it to return on the investment. A high-end big-box security room may not match the war room in a casino, but it's not just a single screen and a VCR, either. Plus, cutting-edge tech ages and gets passed down, meaning what you see in casinos eventually gets cheaper and gets used by the big-boxers, too.

How do we stamp out the ransomware business model? Ban insurance payouts for one, says ex-GCHQ director

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Treat it like kidnapping

"Back in the 70s some South American criminals kidnaped a Cola executive."

Won't work now. Most terrorist organizations are media-savvy. They'd take pictures of the carnage and start posting them wherever they can (possibly through a front) and cry out, "This is what your prized Cola company does to innocents!" Can you say PR disaster?

Other organization are just that ruthless and probably would kill the hostage and then nab some more, daring the company to either cough up or risk the former.

TCP alternative QUIC reaches IETF's Standards Track after eight years of evolution

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Really? It will do all that?

To which they respond, "Price of admission. Or would you rather PAY for the privilege?"

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Ready salted packets

There's also the issue that not all parts of the Web need the same level of attention. The baseline HTML, sure, but background images? Many other images? A lot of it is nice but not essential, so UDP should be OK for them; if they get lost, oh well.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Another way of speeding up the internet

Sometimes, you just can't have nice things. If 'cool-looking' gets all the clicks, what else can you do?

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Ready salted packets

"It also kinda misses the point of UDP vs TCP. One offers some form of reliable networking, the other doesn't. "

Counterpoint: TCP is layer 4 and can't ensure reliability if layer 1 (the physical layer) is unreliable, and wireless networks are usually less reliable.Plus a single connection usually means a single thread, reducing parallelism potential.

"Whether that makes a session 'faster' is debateable, especially if it's depending on applications to notice packet loss than network devices."

Consider that back when the protocols were first deployed, local parallelism wasn't exactly en vogue. Now, most applications are expected to be multithreaded and multitasking, able to prioritize and know what's important and what's not. Otherwise, you're going to get into a debate over which has a better idea of how to prioritize: the application layer or the protocol layer?

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: networking boffins rated QUIC as more vulnerable to web fingerprinting than HTTPS

I think the concern is that, by breaking up the one big request into multiple smaller ones, as QUIC does, the pieces can be fingerprinted by address and size, which encryption cannot conceal.

The Fuchsia is now. Google's operating system lands on real-world consumer devices, starting with 2018's Nest Hub

Charles 9 Silver badge

Probably too much baggage. Blackberry licenses QNX to other companies for use in their RTOS systems (QNX is used in car systems and so on), and it's still in active development (v7.1 came out less than a year ago). Google likely wanted something similar but under their full control.

Appeals court nixes online blueprint sharing ban on 3D-printed 'ghost guns'

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Obviously more guns needed

Actually, a friend of mine took one recently. And a neighbor recently became a police officer.

Both had something in common: tests at the end to prove they learned what they were taught.

And guess what? Tests can change over time, including for political reasons. If a test or any other criterium exists, it can be altered to fit certain desires, including political ones. Like I said, voting eligibility tests were notorious for excluding people certain others didn't want voting. What's to stop that happening with a gun certification test?

Put simply, if there's one reason lots of Americans put their faith in their guns, it's because they DON'T put their faith in the government. The United States was founded on DISTRUST of government, and that will never go away.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Obviously more guns needed

What point is a course without a test to prove you learned what you're supposed to learn on the course? Meaning a course is essentially a test, which can always be gamed.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Obviously more guns needed

"PLEASE have all adults and teens take a hunter safety course before bringing firearms into a previously unarmed home."

The obvious counter would be ANY test, any at all, can and inevitably will be gamed to ban gun ownership by the back door, simply by making the test nigh-impossible to pass. If people are willing (with proof) to game voting eligibility tests, eventually forcing a ban on voting eligibility tests via the Voting Rights Act and the 23rd Amendment ban on poll taxes, what's to stop a tyranny from saying if you want to exercise your 2nd Amendment rights, just pass this looks-easy-but-really-impossible test?

It's rapidly becoming a "we just can't have nice things" problem where the medium is UNhappy.

Apple's macOS is sub-par for security, Apple exec Craig Federighi tells Epic trial

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: I'd be annoyed if the walled garden is opened up.

Obvious counter: if there's a way to break the walled garden, social engineering will come up with ways to make Dave turn it off in the name of "enhanced security". So Apple doesn't provide such an option with iOS: no way to turn off something that has no switch, their thinking goes.

Which leaves a no-win situation: too tight and you tick off power users who complain; too lax and Daves get their devices pwned and complain, and the medium is probably UNhappy as you end up with complaints from BOTH of them at the same time.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Crap at your job, or simply no one at all will hire you or even let you have an interview? When not even McDonald's (substitute appropriate regional "will hire anyone" place as needed) will hire you, where does that leave you?

Tesla Autopilot is a lot dumber than CEO Musk claims, says Cali DMV after speaking to the software's boss

Charles 9 Silver badge
FAIL

Re: I don't get it

"Rather than risking having to drive dangerously to meet my commitments, I factor in contingency if it really is that important to my livelihood or the lives of my loved ones. If road conditions were so dire that even this didn't work I still wouldn't take risks as I'd have a good justification for missing the appointment. At the end of the day I would like to think my loved ones would prefer me to lose employment or money than risk losing my life."

Consider yourself fortunate to even have that agency. For others (consider Amazon workers--remember the stories of peeing in bottles in hidden corners and cutting out GPS trackers to meet impossibly-high standards), they're one and the same because the job prospects anywhere near them are just that cutthroat. Unless they thread the needle and do everything rightfast, they're dead...or worse (and yes, I have seen such conditions--they also have local and/or regional governments in thrall, thus my questions on how long before the biggest tech companies pull a Sprawl and declare sovereignty).

Shock Land Rover Discovery: Sellers could meddle with connected cars if not unbound

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Good Grief.

But then you get the other end of the spectrum: an abusive relation who pretends a vehicle is stolen so as to track down someone who is secretly abused, among other scenarios.

IOW, it's an UNhappy medium.

Nvidia nerfs RTX 3080, 3070, 3060 Ti GPUs to shoo away Ethereum miners

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Market abuse...

I think that's why the LHR cards. These cards will have the limits baked into the silicon so they can't be worked around like the software limiter. But like I said, how long before they rework the hashing algorithms to make them hard to tell from real gaming?

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Market abuse...

But they're also useless on the gray market. Many of the miners want the consumer-useful cards so once they're done with them, they can turn around and resell them to recoup investment.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: There is a moral aspect to it

"It is good NVIDIA is trying to limit this, they are of course aware that in a capitalist world, it is only a matter of time before someone comes up with an idea to provide good graphics performance which can not be used as tool for drug money makers."

I don't see how. Heavy math performance is needed in both 3D modeling/gaming and crypto hashing. nVidia in this case is like a knife manufacturer: their flagship product is unavoidably multi-use with at least one of the uses being unsavory. Sometimes, you just can't avoid the bad press, just as you can't blame the knife manufacturer the next time a mass stabbing hits the news.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Market abuse...

So the next supply shock hits and you get a case of the runs, be lucky you can buy a $20 roll of single-ply toilet paper from a scalper (stranger things have actually happened)?

Charles 9 Silver badge

How does it tell the difference?

I have to wonder how long before 3D gaming/modeling and proof-of-work hashing get harder to tell apart, to the point either the hashing trolls make an algorithm the cards can't distinguish or a new gaming engine comes along that gets nerfed on the LHR cards...

Cloudflare launches campaign to ‘end the madness’ of CAPTCHAs

Charles 9 Silver badge

I'm wondering if it'll eventually have to come down to just that (authentication and identity at every site) simply due to the Tragedy of the Commons. Anything free will be exploited due to human nature, meaning some kind of restriction or regulation will become necessary just to keep things sane.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Hardware dongles?

That's intentional. "No match" can be a correct answer in this case, and you just click Next without selecting anything.

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: Hardware dongles?

Oh? What's to stop miscreants obtaining a few of them legitimately, breaking them down, and figuring out how they work so that their bots can emulate them (or at the very least, copy the abilities of the legit keys they do obtain)? What man can create, man can usually recreate.

Charles 9 Silver badge
Big Brother

Re: Hardware dongles?

Yeah...for Big Brother or a miscreant with a hidden antenna. Plus there are plenty of phones that simply lack the capability. As for bots...can't they just FAKE it?

Charles 9 Silver badge

Re: I want a CAPTCHA solving browser extension

What's to stop them just making harder CAPTCHAs that your supposed extension can't break?

Someone needs to demonstrate, conclusively, that there is NO way to tell way a human from a well-trained bot, for the two simple reasons. One, the use of a computer limits the inputs. And two, a bot, being a computer itself, can simply master and then fake ALL of them.

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