* Posts by Pirate Dave

1443 posts • joined 25 Oct 2008

Page:

Google sours on legacy G Suite freeloaders, demands fee or flee

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

So, eh, when did Google notify the affected users? And how do we tell if we're going to lose service? I mean, assuming we haven't gotten an email from the Chocolate Factory yet. I haven't received any notice from Google that they are going to cut me off if I don't pay, nor are there any announcements about it in the Admin console, but at the same time, I'm not 100% sure what service I do have now. I've had my account since 2006, back when it was called Google Apps for Domains.

$72/year is a bit much, IMHO, considering I primarily only use it for email formy vanity domain. I guess if it's not free anymore, then it's not useful anymore, and I'll move on - maybe get another VM from Vultr for $5/month and run my own email server. Hmm, I wonder if I can still find my old Groupwise 6.5 install CD. lol.

Email blocklisting: A Christmas gift from Microsoft that Linode can't seem to return

Pirate Dave Silver badge

After a couple of hundred spams, the account gets restricted and the admin has to remove it from the restricted list. This is a commonplace problem with less-sophisticated users who fall for phishing scams. And some folks fall for them time after time after time.

Google leads legacy Voice phone service out behind the barn, two shots ring out

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Gmail will never die. There's too much data to be mined in those emails for Google to ever (willingly) give it up.

North Korea says it's launched a third hypersonic missile, this time reaching Mach 10

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Sure...

Mach 10? Well, maybe next time they'll turn it up to 11.

Mobile networks really hate Apple's Private Relay: Some folks find iOS privacy feature blocked on their iPhones

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Verizon

I got the notice from Verizon about their over-eager sniffing last month and opted-out immediately. Fucking spooky shit. Whoever thought that up at Verizon needs to fuck themselves vigorously with a broken light-bulb until they realize what a horrible idea it was.

It is seriously sad that the IT/Telecoms industry sees its customers as nothing more than milk cows full of juicy data to make the rich richer (and the Zucks Zuckier). I mean, I can sort of maybe understand the justification for "free" sites like Facebook, Google, etc. But not fucking Verizon, who I pay $800+/year for cell phone service. Fuckers!

<and now, back to our regularly scheduled program>

No defence for outdated defenders as consumer AV nears RIP

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: Failure of capitalism

I didn't remember it either, until AC posted that it was MSAV. Then I remembered. Easy to forget about it, though. Back then, most all you had to worry about was "where has this floppy been" and ejecting the floppy before you reboot the computer. Oh, and make sure your shareware came from a reputable source. So for the most part, there wasn't much need for AV software unless you thought you had an infected floppy or file, and certainly no need for always-running AV that chews-up 1 GB+ of RAM.

Much simpler times back then.

AT&T, Verizon delay 5G C-band rollout over FAA fears of passenger plane radars jammed by signals

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: re: Why is everything suddenly a threat to our (US) democracy?

Don't forget Madonna. Or Kathy Griffin. Or most of Hollywood in 2017. All disagreeing with the results of the 2016 election. All the masturbatory marches, the rallies, and the constant denigration of everyone who voted for the Orange Guy. Don't forget Dave Chappell almost getting ostracized for daring to say that we needed to give Orange Guy a chance. I think THAT'S the "hard left" he's talking about.

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: re: Why is everything suddenly a threat to our (US) democracy?

"removing civil service protections and making employees 'at will'"

Having dealt with some of the sterling examples of Federal civil servants, I can't say that's necessarily a Bad Thing (tm). Lazy or incompetent, I don't know. I just know that some of them seem to think that "working" isn't actually part of "going to work". But hey, they're untouchable once they get in, no matter how poor they are at customer service, so they have no reason to tone-down the disdain. Just my experience though.

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: re: Why is everything suddenly a threat to our (US) democracy?

Well, I'll admit, my semi-automatic firearms rarely disappoint me; politicians, not so much.

It's not so much whether it is or isn't under threat, it's why is that suddenly the catch-phrase? Sure, democracy in the US has been under threat pretty much since the country was founded, that's nothing new. But it perseveres and marches on in one form or another, wearing whatever the latest fashion is in politics, but still democracy underneath.

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Come on, El Reg, you left off the end of the quote...

"Agreeing to your proposal would not only be an unprecedented and unwarranted circumvention of the due process and checks and balances carefully crafted in the structure of our democracy, but an irresponsible abdication of the operating control required to deploy world-class and globally competitive communications networks that are every bit as essential to our country's economic vitality, public safety and national interests as the airline industry, As well, your mother was a hamster, and your father smelt of elderberries."

Why is everything suddenly a threat to our (US) democracy? Or is that just the new, hip way of saying "think of the children"?

The Ghost of Windows Past haunts a street corner in Bermondsey

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: What I want to know is

We have a Linux-based signage system at work from MVix. It works fairly well, but still does soil the bed from time to time.

The thing is, it mostly displays PowerPoint files. That's the thing to keep in mind - the component that displays the image on the screen is only half of the solution, the other half is the backend software that lets the semi-sentient droids in HR determine what is going to be shown on the screen. And, for the most part, they build their slideshows in PowerPoint and import them, in spite of the fact that the MVix software can display text, graphics, and video, and do timed screen wipes, fades, etc possibly even better than PowerPoint does. But it's the familiarity that they want, so they stick to what they know. And it's the powerpoint files that cause the little display computer to crap its pants once in a while. Even in a non-Microsoft ecosystem, PowerPoint is still the root of all evil.

Windows takes a breather in London's Spitalfields

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Why did Microsoft call their sleep command "timeout"? I guess they were avoiding collision with Powershell's "sleep" command maybe?

OTOH, I didn't even know there was a "timeout" command, so I've learned something today. That's much easier than my usual hack of using "choice /t 3". (If I can remember it's called "timeout" and not sleep or wait or something else).

You geeks have inherited the Earth, but what are you going to do with it?

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: What do we do? More or less what today's lords demand from us

Ook!

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: What do we do? More or less what today's lords demand from us

You used the word "guild". You may be more of a nerd than a geek.

UK National Crime Agency finds 225 million previously unexposed passwords

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Fun times

Checking the unusual but relatively permanent admin passwords from my former employer shows about half of them have been compromised. Funny enough, the compromised ones were the ones from the Windows servers we put in in 2013. None of the Novell or Linux passwords are in that list..

Also fun to check former boss and CEO accounts, all of which show as compromised.

Fisher Price's Bluetooth reboot of pre-school play phone has adult privacy flaw

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Meh

OK, so it's slightly insecure, but it's a kid's toy, not a banking terminal. If memory serves, the old $15 walkie-talkies were also completely insecure, yet civilization continued on in spite of millions of kids calling in air strikes, X-Wings, and artillery barrages on an insecure channel. It's a kid's toy, don't be so serious.

Fans of original gangster editors, look away now: It's Tilde, a text editor that doesn't work like it's 1976

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: Sledgehammer to crack a walnut

A wet tumbler is on my list. I still need to get a chrony and a few other things first, though. I'm almost to the stage where I can cast for all of my pistol calibers (or at least the ones I'll reload - not planning to fuss with the .380 or the .32ACP, too small and fiddly for my aging eyes). You're fortunate if your kids/grandkids have an interest in this, I can't get mine to give half a damn about it.

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: Sledgehammer to crack a walnut

Ground walnut shells are also used to tumble and polish brass for reloading. (At least for those of us who haven't ponied-up for a wet tumbler). Makes cruddy old brass look shiny and new.

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Maybe they should port Tilde to Windows so we can have a decent CLI editor again.

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: There's always Cygwin

Thank <Deity> for Cygwin or there'd have been no good way to run rsync on Windows for ages. And rsync was this poor admin's backup tool of choice back in the noughties. A dozen or so hot-swappable SATA drives, a Kingwin hot-swap chassis and carriers, and you've got a decent backup system for little cost, way faster and cheaper than tape, and doesn't need anything fancier than a standard PC to read the backup in an emergency.

Ahh, life after DDS-4 and before Veeam. I miss those days of exploration, before everything became "best practice" (well, SOMEBODY's best practice, anyway).

Wi-Fi not working? It's time to consult the lovely people on those fine Linux forums

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

I've done similar - beat on stuff for hours, checking, double checking, making tweaks only an electron microscope could see, only for it to turn out to be something dreadfully simple in the end. When this happens at work, I honestly don't mind - I call it a "shakedown" and it means everything not only works, but every component is highly verified to be working properly. That's not a bad thing in this day of graphical installers, package managers, and make install.

Humanity has officially touched the Sun (or, at least, one of its probes has)

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: I do hope that at some point the order is given to...

"My love for Pink Floyd must be eclipsed at the moment,"

Perhaps it was obscured by clouds.

CompSci boffins claim they can recreate missing lines in log files

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

BOFH

Eh, did they ever think that maybe some log entries are missing for a reason? Sheesh...

Timekeeping biz Kronos hit by ransomware and warns customers to engage biz continuity plans

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

We used Kronos for employee timekeeping up until this past April when we moved to ADP. The big driver for us was that Kronos' time-clocks could talk directly to our AS/400. But we switched the backend and time-clocks over to ADP's "cloud" this past Spring, and my total involvement was putting two screws in the wall and plugging the clocks into the network jack. I wonder how vulnerable ADP is....

BOFH: Time to put the Pretty Dumb F in PDF reader

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: Executive MBA

If memory serves, the "Executive" part originally meant it was done Online, since busy midddle-managers wanting an MBA don't have time or desire to go to an actual classroom. And I think they used the more expensive pre-printed diploma blanks as well, not the cheap ones from the Dollar store.

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: Brilliant!

There's a Sharepoint file-migration tool from MS that will copy files from a network share up to a user's One-Drive. It can be laggy at times, mostly depending on what's happening on Microsoft's end. We looked at doing this last year to migrate users' on-prem home directories to OneDrive, but, eh, that project kind of stalled out as the general consensus seemed to be that mapping drive letters to OneDrive isn't terribly reliable, and our users are well-trained that X: is their home directory.

As an admin who's not a Sharepoint guru, I'm not a huge fan of OneDrive. It's quite a convoluted system once you get past the thin skin that is OneDrive and are dealing with the underlying Sharepoint. Give me a decent local file-share any day...

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: Brilliant!

"you're working at a university and a very large lab-full of students power up 60 PCs simultaneously "

Mmmm. I remember those days, harnessing all that computing power for the Good of Mankind with the Seti@Home screensaver. Drop it into the Ghost image for the lab computers, and let it go. Got me into the EDU Top-500 for a while, it did. I don't think we ever found any actual alien radio signals, though, was all just a lark, it seems. But fun.

Microsoft gives Notepad a minimalist makeover to match Windows 11 style

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: Remember Win95?

Thank you. There have been times in the past 20 years where I've thought I must have imagined all that flexibility, that Windows never actually let us do that, that I've got a broken figment of my imagination that I'm remembering incorrectly. After all, why would they strip out such simple but useful customisability from their GUI (which used to be the very heart of their Windows product)? It shouldn't have been a terrible strain on the guys working on the GDI stuff to leave it in. Makes no sense, really.

Progress. On a road that goes nowhere.

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

We should all be thankful for that...

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

My fix for that from days of yore has always been to add shortcuts to Notepad and Wordpad to the SendTo menu. Then it's a simple couple of clicks to re-open the Unix-format file in Wordpad.

NixOS and the changing face of Linux operating systems

Pirate Dave Silver badge

"I think the premise of systemd is do one thing well, and that thing is everything."

Thanks for the chuckle. There's usually scant humor to be found around systemd.

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

"All the enterprise Linux vendors are working away on this. The goal is to build operating systems as robust as mobile OSes: "

Ah, fuck me! There are few computers I hate as deeply and genuinely as my Samsung Galaxy 8 cell phone. It should be SUCH a cool and capable device - it's bloody tiny, has scads of memory and CPU power, and a really great screen. But instead, it's a locked-down piece of corporate vomit, designed for people too stupid to count with both their fingers AND toes, and with all the user-customization capabilities of a maximum-security prison cell. I really, earnestly hope the major distros aren't aiming to take Linux in that same brain-dead direction of top-down neanderthalism. That would be the greatest shame of all. As if systemd (Fuck systemd!!!) wasn't bad enough...

Netgear router flaws exploitable with authentication ... like the default creds on Netgear's website

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: A basic approach

Same here using a Netgear Nighthawk connected to Comcast's cable modem. We've switched ISPs three times in the past 4 years (originally on an AT&T DSL, then "upgraded" to U-verse (bleh!), then moved to Comcast), and none of our connected devices even noticed. I've never been one to trust connecting computers/phones/etc directly to the ISPs device, I've always used my own AP/router to at least give the Bad Guys/script kiddies one additional little speed bump to get past in their quest to commandeer my home network.

Computers cost money. We only make them more expensive by trying to manage them ourselves

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

"So surely it makes more sense to put the responsibility on someone else and getting on with our real jobs."

But, uh, what if our "real job" actually IS maintaining a fleet of servers or desktops/laptops? This is the same argument as the "outsource your IT department to XYZ Managed Services to save money AND allow your IT staff to tackle higher-value tasks". Having been a casualty of THAT battle, my response to the "real jobs" and "higher value" arguments is a very tepid "meh".

Not to mention, the flip-side of this is the unspoken suggestion that those of us with the knowledge and the interest to maintain these beasts should be working for an MSP instead of directly working for a company. I've got friends who have worked at MSPs, and, to the man, they say they are horribly horrible environments to work in.

Microsoft's Teams Essential tier seems designed to coax people on to Business Basic

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: Hmm

Groupwise is still a product, I do believe... ;)

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

That's a bit unfair. With proper fiber intake, shit can be quite reliable.

Specs appeal: Qualcomm and Meta insist headgear to plug you into the metaverse will 'supersede mobile'

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

"Meta, formerly known as Facebook, is betting its social networking future on virtual reality, "

So when this fails as miserably as the Glasshole debacle, does that mean Meta and Facebook will blink out of existence? If not, it isn't much of a "bet" then, sounds more like a side-hustle.

Bosworth's quotes read like the How-To manual for writing vaporware press releases.

Patching Windows Server without needing to reboot is a handy feature – but it's only available on Azure

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: Reality check

We've got 5 DCs total, the most recent three are either 2012 or 2016, it's just the first two that are still 2003 (with DC1 being the original DC they installed when they stepped off the total-AS/400 train back in the early 2000's, hence it having all those services). Migrating the services like the CA, DHCP and RADIUS to a newer version isn't too hard (scary, but not hard), but means I have to make sure I've dug-out all of the infrastructure parts that are hard-coded to use the old server. After 15+ years, there's a lot of cruft built up in various corners, some of which I haven't fully explored yet.

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: Reality check

I feel your pain. Started my "new" job in 2018, quickly found out DC1 was 2003 and was not only the FSMO holder, but also the CA, DHCP, NTP, and RADIUS server. The boss is reluctant to fiddle with something that's "working" , so I'm still in the process of sorting all of that out without getting myself un-employed. (but the money is stupid-good, so I persevere...)

Crypto for cryptographers! Infosec types revolt against use of ancient abbreviation by Bitcoin and NFT devotees

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Confusing poll

Aren't we supposed to get like a week's worth of "For" and "Against" arguments by various illuminaries, along with a daily poll whose questions make some of us wonder whether we're supporting the basic proposal, supporting the opposition of the proposal by a proponent, opposing the support of the opposition, or opposing the opposition by the opposition? I don't understand how a simple poll with four straight-forward questions got past the El Reg Poll soviet.

As to "crypto" itself, my guess is some of the blame for its casual use by the great unwashed is due to Cryptolocker and its descendants muddying the waters even further buy requiring crypto-currency to unlock the encrypted files on the hard drive.

Amazon India execs questioned after sellers allegedly use site to smuggle marijuana

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: Always wondered who buys those £4K books

"On ebay some dealers add a large prefix to a product's price when they temporarily don't want to sell any."

CDW used to do that, too. $99,999 for a 250 GB Seagate hard drive? eh, maybe not today.

Do not try this at home: Man spends $5,000 on a 48TB Raspberry Pi storage server

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Re: Not too bad

OK, fair choice. It's your money, spend it how you want.

For the record, I don't give the money to YouTube, I donate it to AvE via Patreon (and watch his videos there). It gives him the $$$ to buy the $500 drills that he dissects into a pile of components, and the beer he needs to fuel the effort. It's like directly supporting an "artist" as opposed to sending it to a large, faceless entertainment corporation.

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Not too bad

A video about building a $5000 storage device that works but is slow, isn't too naff. I've watched AvE tear into brand-new, relatively expensive tools in his BOLTR vids, and thought "there's no way he's getting that thing back together and working". And sometimes he doesn't. But I've never begrudged the $5 I donate every month - it's cheap entertainment.

Ubuntu desktop team teases 'proof of concept' systemd on Windows Subsystem for Linux

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Sad

"WSL 2 users though have frequently requested systemd support."

Those poor, ignorant bastards. They have no idea of the fresh hell they're asking for. They're probably just trying to follow recipes from StackOverflow or ServerFault, so they'll never know the feeling of a fresh breeze upon the cheek, or the warmth of the sun on their backs. Just mindless minions, working in the darkest mines of Redmond, looking for some faint glimmer of hope. I pity them.

(oh, I almost forgot -- fuck systemd! )

Seagate demos hard disk drive with an NVMe interface. Yup, one with spinning platters

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: Hardware vs Software

"that's because it's hard to apply a hardware update in the field"

Don't we call that "planned obsolescence" these days?

Your shiny tat's gone bad? Yeah, that was a bad design, but we've fixed it in the new model. Go ahead and send that to the landfill and buy this new model with more extra *Shiny*.

(I say this as an American, since we don't have the "fit for purpose" protections like you Brits do)

Microsoft rolls out $3-a-user Defender for small biz types

Pirate Dave Silver badge

Re: I can already smell the Fail!

Yeah, I've noticed that Sophos is a HUGE resource hog. Even turning off most of the higher-end stuff, it still manages to use about a Gig of memory. And it runs 20+ processes to do all of that.

We peeled off of Kaspersky because the VP didn't like the ties to Russia.

Remember SoftRAM 95? Compression app claimed to double memory in Windows but actually did nothing at all

Pirate Dave Silver badge
Pirate

Ah, yeah, I missed where he said "Internet" connection. zmodem wouldn't help there.

Page:

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY TECH NEWSLETTER

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022