* Posts by Guus Leeuw

299 posts • joined 27 Mar 2008

Page:

ZFS co-creator boots 'slave' out of OpenZFS codebase, says 'casual use' of term is 'unnecessary reference to a painful experience'

Guus Leeuw

Re: It's not about the words

Dear Sir,

That "orange house" reference will not gain traction in and around Ireland, I'm afraid to have to point out as a Dutch person.

Interestingly enough, the Dutch have been part and partial to a lot of the situations that we now deem problematic. *But*, as has always been the case and will always be the case, animals will always exploit the weaker [animal]. Humans *have* a chance to stand above that most natural of instincts when it comes to treating humans who are different: Respect those differences, engage in them, and accept those differences. Any two people are *not* the same *ever*. However they can be treated the same. This is the concept of "Do not do onto others what you do not want others to do onto you".

Just my two cents (whatever a cent is worth these days),

Guus

Contact-tracing app may become a permanent fixture in major Chinese city

Guus Leeuw

Do you?

Dear Sir / Madam,

Can I kindly ask whether Robbie Harb actually reads the text before it is posted?

Best regards,

Guus

LastPass stores passwords so securely, not even its users can access them

Guus Leeuw

Re: Right I know I'm about to get battered for this

Dear Sir,

"it doesn't name the site implicitly" Does it name the site explicitly?

Best regards,

Guus

Blackout Bug: Boeing 737 cockpit screens go blank if pilots land on specific runways

Guus Leeuw

Re: Actually

Dear Sir,

IMHO it's not that software developers are too lazy to test properly. It is more that software developers know too much about the software so they tend to test around its pitfalls.

Software testing, even test-driven-development and regression tests, *must* *always* *only* be based on the requirement specification. Even low level functions have requirement specifications. There's normally a number of boundaries in such a specification that determines the outcome of the low-level function. Those boundaries need to be tested in Unit testing. Unit testing, then, needs to be part of an automated regression test. Ideally, if certain boundaries cause unexpected results, the low level function in question should decline to run and instead throw some sort of an exception.

The one thing that is *hard* to test is the User Interface and / or User Experience... That's where the Business Analysts come in... These people know the business domain and have a good understanding of what the software is expected to do, so they need to get their hands dirty with regards to the test phase of a project... Be that through active testing, or through writing precise and detailed test script documents.

Best regards,

Guus

Alphabet, Apple, Dell, Tesla, Microsoft exploit child labor to mine cobalt for batteries, human-rights warriors claim

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

they sue.. good... then they go home and watch... I don't know.... Junior Bake Off!!??

Best regards,

Guus

A spot of after-hours business email does you good, apparently

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

the first job on a Monday coming back from holidays has to be to open the Inbox, select all messages and put them in the archive for that year (bin or actual archive...).

Then coffee and handshakes and tales about holidays...

Those people who really need your attention will come back fairly soon... Those whose problems are dealt with, will not let you know... The rest ah well... If they can't be bothered to remind you about their email, it wasn't all that important.

Best regards,

Guus

After banning adverts in command-line terminals, NPM floats idea of Patreon-style donations to open-source devs

Guus Leeuw

From a business perspective

Dear Sir,

I am a CTO in one of my roles, a paid-for-developer in another of my roles and an OSS developer in yet another one of my roles.

it makes sense to use open source software from a business and developer's perspective, for many reasons.

However, as suggested already above, a company that gains from using OSS should also actively seek out the foundations / people behind the OSS and be prepared to pay these a royalty fee. What is the amount of royalties that you should be prepared to pay? Under the assumption that you have a Research & Design budget, you should aim to spend at least 10% of that on OSS. If there isn't an R&D budget, you should aim to spend at least 10% of your "vertical" (CTO, CIO, CFO, etc...) budget on OSS. (Why 10%? Simply because a charitable gift of 10% is accepted as a treshold in many religious contexts ;-) Not that I'm religious, mind! It's also a nice round number: dividable by 2 and 5. where 10b represents 2 (as in 2 people / organizations that profit from the charitable donation)...)

This would be for OSS that you use directly. E.g. Linux Foundation if you develop on Linux machines, OpenSSL if use encryption in your software. If you have an AWS server that runs Linux, Amazon should be paying the Linux Foundation of royalty fee, not you.

The royalty fee can be given in a number of ways: Money, hiring an OSS person and pay their wages, taking over the cost of infrastructure for an OSS, etc etc.

How to divide the royalty budget? Depends on how much you actively use each OSS, really... Yes, this requires some investigation at first, but the pay off is that the software you rely on will have a chance to be maintained in the future.

Now, honestly, I don't particularly care about how much / if at all OSS contributors are paid, however the open source software that is written as a whole should be funded.

It worked the same way in the music industry for years (before copyright kicked in): anybody could record songs from any songwriter or other artist. But you had to pay royalties to them, because it was their original art. Much like it kind of still works with books... You pay the publisher who pays the author.

Best regards,

Guus

Uncle Sam is Huawei out of line with these hacking attacks, patent probes, Chinese mobe maker sighs

Guus Leeuw

Beat them at their own game...

Dear Sir,

"albeit without evidence"... Is that any better or worse than what Uncle Sam did?

As a general reminder: Iraq, Huawei... I'm sure there were others and I can positively announce that there will be others in the future of the US of A...

Regards,

Guus

Clutching at its Perl 6, developer community ponders language name with less baggage

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

why are you throwing Gimp / Glimpse in to the mix here? The issues of Perl 5 / Perl 6 are vastly different than those from Gimp / Glimpse.

You gimp!

Best regards,

Guus

Gov flings £10m to help businesses get Brexit-ready with, um... information packs

Guus Leeuw

Re: Maybe it's another Boris bluff....

Dear Sir,

"but the UK can't agree on the Irish border"...

The reason that UK can't agree on the Irish border is that there is a part of EU legislation that dictates that borders with non-EU states / nations must be protected. Since the UK would be leaving the EU, it is for the UK to decide what to do. Putting up border forces and fences will cost money ("the Mexicans will pay for the wall" doesn't quite cut it in the UK somehow). So throwing money at something you haven't explained before is not a very wise thing to be doing for a government. Not putting up a border puts the Republic of Ireland at peril with regards to EU legislation, so the problem is firmly in UK's hands to come up with a proposal.

And the wheels on the bus go round and round...

Regards,

Guus

Harvard freshman kicked out of US over OTHER people's posts on his social media

Guus Leeuw

Re: Twitter?

Dear Sir,

Also, if you made a downvote and want to correct that to an upvote, you can upvote... It will decrease your downvote from the downvotes, and it will increase the upvotes...

Cancelling a vote???!! ;-) Not very democratic!

Regards,

Guus

BOFH: What's Near Field Implementation? Oh, you'll see. Turn left here

Guus Leeuw

For the record

Dear Sir,

we can finally do away with the moniker Anonymous Coward as it is now known that AC is, in fact, DSGiTechGuy.

Best regards,

Guus

Hey China, while you're in all our servers, can you fix these support tickets? IBM, HPE, Tata CS, Fujitsu, NTT and their customers pwned

Guus Leeuw

Maybe....

Dear Sir,

now that this is revealed, can President Trump please drop his war on the US or Iran, and instead call for a war on China?

Best regards,

Guus

Stop us if you've heard this one: US government staff wildly oblivious to basic computer, info security safeguards

Guus Leeuw

Better late than never

Dear Sir,

Should President Trump not declare war on the US for even allowing the computer systems to be so easily hacked by, say, Iranian agents?

Regards,

Guus

China trade tariffs? Fuhgeddaboudit, say Cisco execs. We, er, shifted some production

Guus Leeuw

Don't be daft

Dear Sir,

"Production shifted to nearby countries"...

As some already suggested: that means that China-plants now ship to Taiwan or some such where the very minimum of work is carried out and the product is shipped to the US, avoiding tariffs.

Please, people, do not forget that China has a handle on *a lot* of minerals and materials needed to make semiconductors and complete computers. Their mining operations are huge and global. They are the production plant of the world. Do you think it would be easy, completely without China, to manufacture stuff? Let alone setup a complete new plant in a similarly low-cost country? How about skills and supply-chain? Somewhere in the world, Germany perhaps, there would have been a huge windfall because companies are all of a sudden ordering new production kit. However, Germany's GDP only rose by less than 1%, so not a windfall at all. Remember the time when companies started to move their production lines to China? That was a *very* *good* time for Germany. I really did not see that happening this time around. *And* it took a lot longer than 6 months.

If Trump was serious about his China obsession, he would make sure tariffs are applied to those categories for any product or parts thereof that have been manufactured inside China. But that's not happening. The tariffs are applied to products coming directly from China. So what anybody should do: set up a hub in Taiwan, sail items across from China, apply a sticker to the products and put them in a box, using the same ship that's waiting in the port sail the products onwards to the US.

Just my 2 cents, but really, this is more of the cloak and daggers stuff that popularist politicians pull off these days, making sure the masses are kept stupid and dumb and full of fear for one thing or another, so that they are easier controlled. Religions started that 2000 years ago, and we still haven't learned to toss the shackles of fear?

Guus

Scare-bnb: Family finds creeper cams hidden in their weekend rental by scanning Wi-Fi

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

the UK??? Since 1916, The Republic of Ireland is not part of the UK!

Best regards,

Guus

International Bullying Machine? Big Blue seeks exposure of corporate canary

Guus Leeuw

Re: Editor Optional as well as title?

Thank you, Kane.

Constructive criticism is always welcome: It serves to teach me something!

With respect,

Guus

Guus Leeuw

Editor Optional as well as title?

Dear Sir,

I was looking forward to read this article, but the opening sentence left me wondering whether the journalist knows what he / she / it is doing...

"IBM has demanded to the name..."

Can we have an editor, please?

Regards,

Guus

No dice, comrade! Senate floats Russia-busting election law

Guus Leeuw

Re: Finally

The Angst, dear lglethal, is that this bill / act is a foot in the door for future governments to broaden the retaliation aspects... It's not unheard of that once a government has the ability to do something small, they want to be able to do more... The saying goes: "Give them a hand, they take the whole arm"... It's just human nature...

Guus Leeuw

Finally

Dear Sirs,

Finally, an official bill or act that allows them to nuke the commies! All hail the new-found American My-Way-Or-The-Highway system!!

Best regards,

Guus

IBM so very, very sorry after jobs page casually asks hopefuls: Are you white, black... or yellow?

Guus Leeuw

Re: sorry or not

Dear Shadow Systems,

why the coder(s)?

HR Rep: Please put this ethnicity drop down in the application form.

Coder(s): Are you sure you want Yellow?

HR Rep: Yes, put it in, please.

Coder(s): Can I have that in writing, please?

HR Rep: Sure, here you go. Put it in!

I have you this: The person who made the decision to have that put in needs piking, but it is not necessarily the coder(s) who is(are) at fault.

Best regards,

Guus

Uncle Sam to its friends around the world: You can buy technology the easy way, or the Huawei

Guus Leeuw

Re: Open Source

Dear Mr Williams,

why should Huawei do that?

In reality, the Chinese government should put duty so high on anything American that the US companies cannot even begin to actually import stuff into China. The next step is for China to take a case in front of the WTO against the US for blackmailing and creating artificial monopolies.

This is all Uncle Sam telling the world about Weapons of Mass Destruction. All over again. Back then, it was a monkey with the lowest IQ any President had so far, and now it is another monkey that thinks that the monkey that shouts loudest, wins. But backing up their claims of wrongdoing with actual evidence? Guilty until proven innocent, eh???

The US of A can fock right off, as far as I am concerned with all that stupid crap they are pulling since the early 1970s...

Regards,

Guus

European Commission orders mass recall of creepy, leaky child-tracking smartwatch

Guus Leeuw

There's something good here

Dear Sir,

<sarcasm>

4 eyes is better than 2, isn't it.

</sarcasm>

Regards,

Guus

Abracadabra! Tales of unexpected sysadmagic and dabbling in dark arts

Guus Leeuw

Fan problems

Dear Sir,

back in the early days, I was tasked with rewriting the runtime library of a computer language from K&R C into ANSI C. This was on Slackware Linux using the appropriate GNU toolset.

I was stunned to find that the assembly code written by the C compiler did, in fact, not compile into object format... And the behaviour was eratic as well, in that sometimes this file and sometimes that file would produce weird error message from gcc. We were all stunned, as the PC in question was brand new and bought only a couple of days before the problem started showing up... The odd thing was, though, once the assembly code failed somewhere specific, rerunning the toolset would make it fail there again and again until the next day, when a new problem would arise that I could not find a solution for.

Having asked all the compiler people in the office, I was left to my own devices, and after another couple of days, I decided that the problem must be inside the PC's casing. So I removed the casing, and lo and behold, the CPU Fan wasn't spinning... A quick nudge with the top of my pencil sorted it out.

The office manager made sure that the manufacturer (a local PC guy) came by to fix the CPU Fan... This was rather a quick job that only meant I had to go for an early lunch downstairs at the Pizza Hut (I think it was, could have been a Domino's) and wait for your man to come and tell he had replaced the Fan.

It still spooks me when one part of a compiler toolchain cannot understand what another part of that same toolchain generates...

Best regards,

Guus

Brit banks must disclose outages via API, decrees finance watchdog

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

"complaint" or "compliant"?

So, the FCA is thinking that the general population cares about these numbers? The general population cares when there's an outage. Soon as the outage is over they'll continue regardless.

I seriously doubt that the population will wipe out a bank (by leaving it en masse) just because the number of outages is > 0 or whatever your threshold is... Or that they even read the number in question.

Best regards,

Guus

Kids are more likely than adults to submit to peer pressure from robots

Guus Leeuw

Re: RTM is well on its way, but not here yet

Dear Sir,

"I don't think we need to worry about robots raising our children wrong yet". Meaning humans are raising their children not "wrong"?

Define "wrong" ;-)

Best regards,

Guus

When's a backdoor not a backdoor? When the Oz government says it isn't

Guus Leeuw

Dear sir,

if they already know the sentence is 3 years or more, why do they still need access to data?

Best regards,

Guus

Make Facebook, Twitter, Google et al liable for daft garbage netizens post online – US Senator

Guus Leeuw

Re: It's the easy way out...

Dear Sir,

well luckily, these laws that you mention are only in force in Holland. Saner parts of The Netherlands might have saner laws, then, I suspect?

Best regards,

Guus

The internet's very own Muslim ban continues: DNS overlord insists it can freeze dot-words

Guus Leeuw

"broke"?

Dear Journalist,

since when is "broke" a word that can be used in the context that you used it in? "broken" is the word you were looking for.

Dear Editor,

please make sure to read articles before they are published, so that you can avoid bad English. This reading of articles also gives you a clear opportunity to replenish failing keyboards that, for example, lack a working "N" key...

Best regards,

Guus

FBI boss: We went to the Moon, so why can't we have crypto backdoors? – and more this week

Guus Leeuw

Re: Eggs out of pancakes

Dear Symon,

How dare you compare pancakes to kitchen scraps!

Best regards,

Guus

UK.gov is ready to talk data safeguards with the EU – but still wants it all

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

maintaining the autonomy of the EU and its citizens would mean that European Citizens can drive their cars and lorries on the right, even the correct, side of the road.

Could that be worked into one of the non-proposals that are so widely and wildly documented in the latest white paper?

Best regards,

Guus

Fitness app Polar even better at revealing secrets than Strava

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

I understand that technology moves on, however for those of us who are stuck in the past, could you please explain how one would remote an application from ones mobile phone?

Best regards,

Guus

Cyber boffins drill into World Cup cyber honeypot used to cyber lure Israeli soldiers

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

At the same, in other news: those Israeli soldiers attack and try to relocate Palestinian citizens, because Israel wants to build houses on Palestine grounds for Israelis.

The deal from 1947 or thereabouts is still a mess. If Israel was that important to the US, they should have given, say, Texas or Nevada to the Israelis and should have said: "We welcome you here"...

One cannot enforce a correction of history onto other people. Ever! The US should really learn that, and stop forgetting where the people that inhabit the US these days actually came from.

Regards,

Guus

Registry to ban Cyrillic .eu addresses even if you've paid for them

Guus Leeuw

Re: A typically political decision...

Dear Sir,

"I live in Holland..." that, according to this Twentenaar, is the problem!

Best regards,

Guus

The suits helped biz PC makers feed their kids in bumper Q2

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

were those people that made up the end-of-quarter report equipped with a Crystal Ball? By my reckoning, it is around the 26th of June, far off from the 30th of June, which is supposedly the end of the quarter...

Also, in reply to some GDPR comments, GDPR indicates that companies should endeavour to make sure that there IT is "safe" and as per "best practise"... Having old PCs running God-knows-what-OS is not the best practise... My missus came home the other day with a laptop from work... Some Toshiba thing. It is thicker than my Alienware 17... :D

Best regards,

Guus

Amazon, eBay and pals agree to Europe's other GDPR: Generally Dangerous Products Removed from websites

Guus Leeuw

Re: Dangerous?

Can't resist... Sorry!

At least the nose hair was gone, albeit only from the right nostril

'Incomprehensible failure' – Canada's $1bn Phoenix payroll IT fiasco torched by auditors

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

this has gone on for ages and ages. And it will continue for ages and ages...

The problem is two-fold:

1) Management is paid (as already indicated) partially by bonuses upon delivery of something. That leads to rushed schedules. Always has and always will.

2) Even when the project is intended to be agile, there's always somebody fixing the budget. That leads to delayed functionality.

I always ask my clients: Is this an agile project? If they say yes, I present them with a never-ending, all-encompassing contract where they pay me $y a month, and I promise to deliver x hours worth of work doing whatever it is they tell me to do. They always come back with: "But we only have $ amount"... To which I always reply: "So the project is not agile, then, is it?"

If the clients indicate that it is a waterfall project, I immediately pull out a Business Analyst and let that person have a go at finding all the requirements. Then I add a System Architect / Data Architect to translate those requirements in costable work-units. Then I add a Finance Guru / Sales specialist to come up with a cost for the *agreed* scope. When everything is signed, I add a dogmatic scope-and-finance driven project manager to control the client, whilst I let developers get on with the job at hand.

If the client wants to restrict time, or start early, we can always talk about versions of the software-to-be-built. The balance the *client* has to find is: what functionality is needed for the first version. A very difficult balance to strike.

Ultimately, even in properly scoped, documented, managed projects, there will inevitably be delays. What most projects and project managers forget is that you *need* a communications matrix that tells you who your friendly counterpart is to help you solve which type of problem (money, schedule, scope). For *massive* replacement projects, you need to take all the end-users from day one on a journey that tells them about the new system, shows them how it works, and gives key-users the ability to interact with the new system while it is being build... *Never* *ever* develop something in a closed-door environment to reveal it on D-Day to the hordes of end-users... They will inevitably not like what they see, because it is "different"...

There you have it... More than $0.02 worth, but you're very welcome!

Regards,

Guus

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

There's a typo around "date of the hardware"... probably wanted to type data there instead of date...

"... the server doesn't even record the IP it's sent from ... ": How do you *know*? Somebody said so? Or did you actually see what the server is doing? If the server is at all logging access requests, they are very likely also logging the Client IP address. The log entry will have some form of timestamp as well. Do they know when your data record was stored in the DB? If so, GDPR applies, because well all of a sudden they can link the DB record to your IP address, and IP addresses are PII...

Best regards,

Guus

Airbus windscreen fell out at 32,000 feet

Guus Leeuw

Re: Hero ? @Khaptain

Dear Sir,

since it is all relative, would you mind defining your view of what "well paid" means, exactly?

Also, as many already pointed out, this situation is untrainable, really. However I do grant that you said "these kinds of situations". Please, and again since it is all relative, what do you mean with "kinds of situations"? Did you mean the generic "emergencies", which includes a lot of turbulence, potential loss of hydraulic systems, or maybe multiple engine failures (all the stuff / emergencies that pilots do get trained for)?

Lastly, and to put you mildly in your place, a hero is a "person who is admired for their courage, outstanding achievement, or noble qualities". ( I do not know exactly what noble qualities are, but then again, I'm not in the business of feeding you the thesaurus - you can look that up yourself, I am sure. ) Why would you not call this particular pilot, or the whole crew for that matter, heros? Without knowing all the details of the incident, the feeling that these people managed to pull off an "outstanding achievement" makes the use of the word "hero" quite adequate.

I thought, as a Khaptain, you'd understand, really!

Best regards,

Guus

if dev == woman then dont_be(asshole): Stack Overflow tries again to be more friendly to non-male non-pasty coders

Guus Leeuw

Re: Try it and see

Wouldn't that result in a "duplicate" strike down for the second "similar" post?

US spanks EU businesses in race to detect p0wned servers

Guus Leeuw

Seriously...

Dear Sir,

"Organisations in EMEA are taking almost six months (175 days) to detect an intruder in their networks, which is rather more than the 102 days that the firm found when asking the same questions last year. In contrast, the median dwell time in the Americas has improved from at 76 days in 2017, compared with 99 in 2016. Globally it stands at 101 days."

Stone-editor... Again!

Regards,

Guus

US cops go all Minority Report: Google told to cough up info on anyone near a crime scene

Guus Leeuw

As the case is here in the Republic of Ireland, it is very much different... Back in the day, police people got recruited because of their physical appearance... You'd have to be 6 ft something, strong, and large... A Jack Reacher kinda guy...

Nowadays, they hire Tom Cruise type people for the police force, even as beat cops. I'm all for equal rights and all that stuff, but a hammer is just not a good tool to cut a piece into two pieces...

That difference in appearance is already putting a target on their back. Also it makes for those people not wanting to go out on the beat, because, well, they are attackable, I would assume. Would you put yourself in a dangerous position? Neither would a cop. ;-) But "dangerous" is relative.

It's not an easy situation to sort out / deal with, for sure, and the sword cuts both ways, I would still argue, though, that visible presence is everything...

1997/1998, Santa Barbara CA: A cop in a cruiser along turnpikes and highways... not everywhere, but often enough you saw one sitting at the curb monitoring traffic... Also, in Goleta, you wouldn't have to wait for campus cops to come to a phoned-in publicly drunk situation... the cops would arrive faster than you walk to the end of the block... That alone will keep a lot of folks in check...

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

this is a difficult one on the face of it.

However I would wholeheartedly argue that the police should do more in the public eye. An investigation using electronic data to find people provides for a situation where the police is not visibly on the street trying to find witnesses. That in itself cannot be good. Feeling protected and secure can only be achieved when those who are supposed to provide that protection and securety are visible and are around.

The village constable, in my day, knew what you were doing day in day out, because he walked the streets, and he talked to the people that he met. Poeple knew him, and he was approachable. Stuff got sorted out that way.

Nowadays, I don't see police other than when they use their siren to jump a traffic queue at a busy crossing so that they can get to the chipper before you.

Best regards,

Guus

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

the problem is, in fact, not so much with the police finding out your whereabouts at the time indicated in the warrant. The problem is, I would suppose, much more with the police having a lot of data that they have no obligation to delete after the criminal case was finished. So they hold this data forever. Which, in itself, is not a problem. However, as happens so often, since they are holding that data (albeit for a very singular purpose), somebody else (even within the police) might use that data for a whole different case / cause, and thereby simply misusing the data, the warrant and the system.

CCTV to keep us secure, fair enough, catch the thief. But do not use that footage to go after people that don't pick up dog poo.

As with any data, the access rights should be farily tightly controlled, however that is still a non-consideration for most people in the enforcing and judging branches of government.

Regards,

Guus

Uber breaks self-driving car record: First robo-ride to kill a pedestrian

Guus Leeuw

Dear Sir,

How do you, uhm, recruit people whose job title will be "accident enhancement manager" and whose job will be to randomly run into the road at night wearing dark cloths?

Seriously: Who defines what comprehensive means for a test center like that?

Regards,

Guus

FYI: There's a cop tool called GrayKey that force unlocks iPhones. Let's hope it doesn't fall into the wrong hands!

Guus Leeuw

Re: "Thanks for that excellent example of 'False dichotomy'."

Dear Sir,

The problem in not so much that there is such a device. The problem is that the police has access to it.

Now, I agree, that they need to be able to do their job, but even with the limited information they have today, they fail to do most of their job. Increasing the amount of information isn't going to make that better.

Also, if the police really thinks that this person is the perpertrator, it is indeed quite handy for them to be able to plant evidence on a device once they have unlocked it.

I do not know what the best solution for society is, however I do feel that unfeathered access to people's belongings is not something that the police or indeed the government should have.

Best regards,

Guus

Blackout at Samsung NAND factory destroys chunk of global supply

Guus Leeuw

The maths don't add up...

Dear Sir,

could you kindly get in touch with Samsung and ask them how it is possible that a 30 minute outage caused 11% of their monthly output in ruins?

11% of a month (in time) is roughly 3.3481 days, which is roughly 4821.30 minutes... Since it's a plant, I am assuming 24x7 operations...

Maybe they operate 8 hours a (a third - still leaves 1607.10 minutes in 11%) and only during the week (so operating on 5/7 - still leaves 1147.9286 minutes).

Even with 8-hour week-day-only shifts, 30 minutes is only 2.6134% of the 11% that Samsung claim is now in ruin. What is Samsung doing with its NAND Flash plant?

Reasoning it the other way around:

11% of production in ruins whilst off-line for 30 minutes means that 100% of production can be created in roughly 270 minutes (9 x 11 = 100; 9 x 30 = 270). 270 minutes is slightly more than half a day (8 hour working day). There's, on average, still more than 29 days left in the month after that half a day has been taken away from an average month 30.odd days...

It does not make any sense whatsoever...

Regards,

Guus

Super Cali neutral traffic bill makes web throttling bogus

Guus Leeuw

Re: Doubling down?

Dear Sir,

doubling down (in blackjack) is doubling the bet in exchange for 1 additional card. So it is similar to upping the ante...

Doubling down in political context normally means that a policitian keeps on telling lies even when faced with hard facts that tell the truth / reality.

Doubling down, therefore, has nothing to do with either what the Senator is doing, nor with halving any effort.

Does language not mean anything anymore these days? Can I just use random words that I like the sounds of in order to look more hip? What if I called you a cat, but really you're a dog? Is that OK? Or calling satellites "artifical" in the context of a story about the Keppler Satellite, as if there were naturally occurring man-made f*ing satellites...

Best regards,

Guus

Bad blood: Theranos CEO charged with massive fraud

Guus Leeuw

Re: Buh-bye

Dear Sir,

do you really wonder?

Can I just say that I read 3 articles on ElReg this morning, and I've had my share of bad English for the day... Outfits like ElReg simply regurgitate news (whether that news was already regurgitated or not) for us to swallow. I mean, why in the world would one use the word "artificial" as an adjective to the word "satellite"? Is it to indicate that there are also naturally occuring satellites? In a story about the Keppler Satellite??

It's clear that random people ran write for these media outfits. Nobody needs journalism training anymore... Any twat can write whatever he/she wants and publish it as well (I mean, look at me)... No need for making sure that, at least, the language is sound, never mind the actual contents of the publication.

So old-school journalism *still* is vital to the world, and I for one am happy to see it!

Regards,

Guus

Next; tech; meltdown..? Mandatory; semicolons; in; JavaScript; mulled;

Guus Leeuw

Re: Tabs v spaces

Dear Sir,

languages that need whitespace to decide the structure of a program should be similarly taken around the back of the shed.

Regards,

Guus

Page:

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR WEEKLY TECH NEWSLETTER

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2020