* Posts by joe

4 posts • joined 15 Nov 2007

US Wi-Fi piggybacking won't put you in pokey

joe

@ Barrie Shepherd:

@ Barrie Shepherd:

That has to be the best analogy that has been used yet! I must use that one myself sometime. Very good.

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@ Anonymous Coward

Quote

"what if i don't mind others using my broadband?

By Anonymous Coward

Posted Tuesday 25th March 2008 17:33 GMT

I leave the encryption and MAC address list thing switched off, and have named the network "HaveSome" - so that passers-by can use it if they want. sure if i notice someone camped outside i might change it, but for people using mobile nternet devices i don't mind if they use some of mine...

am i being really stupid?"

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Yes! What if someone downloads some child porn or something using you ADSL/Cable. Who's door will the police be kicking in! Just being accused is enough to ruin someone's life.

Microscope-wielding boffins crack Tube smartcard

joe
Thumb Up

Here is a good video.

There is a good video on this here:

http://www.hackaday.com/2008/01/01/24c3-mifare-crypto1-rfid-completely-broken/

Half of computer users are Wi-Fi thieves

joe
Unhappy

WPA

There has been a few remarks on here that WPA is not secure. would someone like to back that up with an explanation?

WEP is not secure but WPA with a long random password (at least 20 characters) is very safe. It would take years to break or brute force this encryption.

Of course if you used a dictionary based password then yes it can be broken with a simple dictionary attack.

joe
Mars

WEP

Not to mention that WEP is used a lot on wireless networks and it can be cracked in less than 5 minutes.

WPA / WPA2 with a random password of at least 20 characters is a good way to secure your network.

These people that got caught most likely got caught red handed, lets face it, do you really think that the police have the time, resources and experience to track down someone who accessed an open network?

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