* Posts by hedgie

140 publicly visible posts • joined 7 Mar 2023

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T-Mobile US drags New Jersey borough to court over school cell tower permit denial

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Re: TMobile is correct, but...

Seriously. It's a good thing that I'm not one of T-Mobile's people there because I would be extremely tempted at the meeting to put a fake tower in the room and then point out that it's not even plugged in once the morons started faking symptoms. I'd definitely be a PR liability.

Vietnam's internet again in trouble as three of five submarine cables go down

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Re: "ships damaging cables"

And never forget Grey's Law: Any sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice.

Payoff from AI projects is 'dismal', biz leaders complain

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Re: Actually the most inappropriate applications

Perhaps I've been lucky with Apple support, with a quick chat solving my last software issue, and my one hardware disaster being largely self-inflicted.[1] PSU decided to go beyond blue smoke and I had to call the fire department just to make sure there wasn't anything still secretly burning in the chair cushion. Then I made the idiotic decision to take out my aggression on the offending part, only finding out the next morning that Apple wanted the original part back or was going to charge 5x the price on the replacement, and still didn't want to deal with me directly.

Oops.

I was fortunate enough to find a repair shop in Berkeley that was quite willing to lie on my behalf, saying that they'd have a certified tech install a new part and got me one for a far more reasonable price with a small markup for their efforts. But yeah, what you said seems to track regarding Apple. Trivial/easy support is fine, but if the rare "thing goes horribly wrong" incident happens to you, it's going to be an ordeal.

[1] I've lost a SCSI controller on a mac too, but it was a 3rd-party card.

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Re: A&A

Even worse. They're all trying to move people to wireless and neglecting existing networks in addition to failing to build new ones. 5G may be great for a phone or tablet on the go (or tethering when necessary) but should never be used for something at a fixed location if there are any other real options. I don't even like having my desktop machine connected to the LAN through WiFi, but the location of the router (and not owning the place so I can't just run a cable and drop it down through the ceiling[1]) for wired. Wireless anything is such a major PITA to troubleshoot, and that's not even getting into the security issues.

So yes, I have the "joy" of no higher-speed options in terms of wired service, on a network that they're trying to dump anyway, and the only alternative, Comcrap charges extortionate overage rates on anything over 1 TB monthly.

[1] Not the prettiest option, but would be the least effort and distance by a long shot

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Re: Actually the most inappropriate applications

And TBH, a sophisticated enough bot *could* handle most requests. A sensible business could spend what they're currently spending on dumb minions on a smaller group of competent techs (and paying them well enough) to deal with what a bot couldn't handle. And skilled people aren't a money-sink, they're valuable to a business and, absent a monopoly, as is the case with much of the US ISP "market", essential in getting people to keep forking over cash. I'm still buying (or paying for services) from those companies that give solid support.

The main reason I still deal with Verizon for mobile, despite them being utter bastards I hate is reliable service and clueful support staff in my dealings. Granted, the last time I called them, the tier 1 tech couldn't do anything, but she quickly realised that the issue was beyond what tools she had available and I got escalated in about five minutes. Tier 2 tech fixed the problem immediately. And yes, the first tech I spoke to didn't have access to the systems to resolve what was ultimately an account issue. Thankfully, it has been years since I've had to call Apple about anything, but I've had nothing but good experiences with their support.

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Re: A&A

Sadly, I'm stuck left-pond. I was with Speakeasy while I was still on dialup, and before they got bought out, then a local ISP for broadband until I had to move somewhere where I'm currently stuck with AT&T. Hopefully, this summer I'll be able to move to Comcrap, which is, sadly, and improvement, at least in terms of support. No fibre options where I am, which I find rather amusing, since the affluent place with the University has maybe 1/8 of its area with fibre available and the "poor" town next door has it everywhere for reasonable prices comparatively.

When I was in Edinburgh (sadly, couldn't get the right visa to stay), I was with Demon, but IIRC they either shut down or got bought out and enshittified.

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Re: Actually the most inappropriate applications

Since I'm unfamiliar with Andrews and Arnold, I have to assume "no".

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Re: Actually the most inappropriate applications

Then again, the half of the local ISP duopoly I'm currently stuck with has "support" so shoddy that a ChatGPT instance would almost certainly be an improvement. Even their own customer fora have numerous posts saying that the only way to avoid the blind following of a script is to talk to the cancellations department. I try to avoid dealing with them whenever possible, but sometimes calls are necessary. With gems like these, how could a bot be worse?

1) Agent refusing to proceed until I have replaced the ethernet cable from the tower to the router when pings to the router are fine, and traceroutes proceed to the first hop outside the LAN and then die.

2) Agent telling me to go into a Windows-specific panel, and telling me to get a Windows machine when I informed them that I run Linux and have no Windoze boxen.

3) Agent wanting to factory reset the router for an email (not mine, I use a real provider, but unfortunately, do not live alone) configuration/authentication issue.

I'm showing my age, but I got spoilt dealing with real ISPs and dealing with people who would actually listen to the described problem, along with the results of any diagnostics I had already run and steps already taken (although verifying them when necessary, can't really trust someone calling in).

Microsoft resumes rollout of Windows 11 24H2 to Insiders

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Re: Make The Assistant Behave More Like An App Pinned To The Taskbar

Now imagine what would happen if you did a search for "Linux Mint". Perhaps it would have self-destructed the PC.

Sodium ion batteries: Yet another innovation poised to be dominated by China

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Re: Written while listening to to "Burning Down the House" by Talking Heads

Ooh! It has been a long time since I've looked at the Periodic Table, and I had totally forgotten that Francium was also on that list of things that react in a spectacular manner with water.

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Re: Written while listening to to "Burning Down the House" by Talking Heads

Bananas are tasty, but I'm holding out for the Caesium batteries for my radioactive power sources.

Microsoft Research chief scientist has no issue with Windows Recall

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I'm the sort who uses both, especially since the online storage for the critical stuff works for "off-site".[1] Paying Tresorit works well enough for sync, and works pretty transparently across Mac/i(Pad)OS and Linux so all my bases are covered there. I had at one point set up a NextCloud server on a Raspi, but the *extremely* limited upload speeds for residential service here in the US made accessing anything the sort of suffering that, were I wanting to torture myself, would be better inflicted by someone who looks good in a corset, so paid service it is. A lot cheaper than buying an old Mac Mini, throwing Linux on it and paying for a co-lo.

For local backups, yes, Time Machine really does suit my needs once proper scheduling is in place, and has saved my arse dozens of times. I really don't see the point of Recall at all except as a punching bag.And the egregious security flaws in what is already an Orwellian concept make it unfit for other purposes. Any decent browser already shows history and can restore a tab closed on accident, there are a ton of backup and sync solutions out there that are totally transparent to the user, and so on.

[1] A few friends and I have all talked about getting external drives, and being custodians of full encrypted backups for one another, swapping drives every month or so by sneakernet for that purpose, but none of us has yet done that so online it is.

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Shows you how long it has been since I set mine up, edited the crontab and then forgotten about it beyond occasionally verifying when the last backup was. And yes, I do 1x/day, at 4am since I'm unlikely to care about what my computer is doing at that hour as long as it doesn't explode.

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If "stuff getting eaten" was a real worry, a backup utility like Time Machine[1] that does regular, and transparent to the user incremental backups and easy rollback or recovery of files would actually be useful rather than this hot steaming pile. Or any reasonable system for syncing designated folders, and the contents thereof with versioning.[2] And at least any decent backup system wouldn't leave a database easily accessible by anyone with juicy private information just waiting to be stolen, and can use encrypted drives.

Further, any decent browser can reopen recently closed tabs. So *what*, if not at least sending metadata to the mothership, is the purpose of this thing?!

[1] Although, its default behaviour itself (1x/hour) is unnecessary overhead. Of *course* there's no option in the GUI to change it, so actual scheduling has to be done with a command-line invocation in the crontab.

[2] Do that one too. One reason is to be able to mirror the critical stuff to my Linux boxen, and another is that after having dealt with catastrophic data loss, albeit self-inflicted, having multiple systems keeping copies of the important stuff somewhere safe is critical.

Windows 11 and Linux gain ground among Steam gamers

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Re: They could do more

Good to know. I'm at the point for some things where I'm gonna have to dual-boot the Intel Mac with Linux for some games. Knowing that I'm not SoL if something doesn't work right makes that decision easier.

Windows 11's Recall feature is on by default on Copilot+ PCs

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Re: Do you trust Microsoft?

Only until yet another forced update. Then it gets re-enabled. When you disable it again, that only lasts until the *next* update. Until it can no longer be disabled at all.

Will Windows drive a PC refresh? Everyone's talking about AI

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Re: RE: 3D TV's

The only 3-D film I've seen is the two hour Daft Punk music video, I mean Tron Legacy, and only because it was only showing that way. The overall effect was something akin to Uncanny Valley for me, and seemed to break immersion for me rather than enhance it.

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Re: IoT

And one's "smartfridge" or lights are not exactly going to be getting patches in a timely manner, if at all, and probably never after three years. They'll also almost invariably have too much of an OS for whatever the thing needs to actually do and no appreciable security on however the owner is supposed to connect to it.

Bored students can now enjoy Sonic 2 on TI-84 Plus CE calculators, thanks to port

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Re: Graphing Calculator

Haven't found one (then again, haven't had the need to look), but for a retro calculator fix on iStuff, I've been using the "Retro 15C" app, for the old pre-suckitude HP RPN calculator. Cloned appearance and all.

Tape is so dead, 152.9 EB of LTO media shipped last year

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Re: Oh, dead as a doornail ...

If I had programming skills beyond enough Bash and Perl to make my life easier, I would absolutely learn COBOL. Lifetime meal ticket and one of those things, were one inclined to emigrate anywhere, an easy visa pretty much anywhere.

Was there no one at Microsoft who looked at Recall and said: This really, really sucks

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Re: Maybe everyone DID point out "This really, really sucks"

For all we know, some variant may yet be discovered on Egyptian Papyri or Babylonian Cuneiform tablets.

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Re: Maybe everyone DID point out "This really, really sucks"

That, good sir, is a work of beauty. I almost had to wipe a tear from my eye at its sublime poetry.

Manjaro 24 is Arch Linux for the rest of us

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Re: I feel so old...

It's one of those "depends on what you're doing" things. I've reached the similar point in my life, where my primary machine is running something that is boring and reliable and works. There are VMs and a Raspi for odd experiments, and a laptop running a "stable enough" rolling release. I'll get off your lawn, but I really don't see anything wrong what that approach. Primary machine is where you put something like *buntu/Mint, Debian Stable, a Mac, or whatever. Save the fighting with an OS for unavoidable catastrophes or something you don't need working NOW.

Research finds electric cars are silent but violent for pedestrians

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Re: GOOD

Warning: ramlbly and a touch ranty.

As someone who does a bike/train commute, I get to see the inattentive, terminally clueless, and just arsehole drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians every day. There are the slow walkers who shuffle from the middle of a bike/pedestrian path, meandering side to side enough that one cannot comfortably overtake taking up a 10' wide path all to themselves, and packs of joggers reminding one of why they all ended up on the B Ark. Drivers seem to think that a "yield" sign at a nearly blind corner means "take at speed" regardless of those on the bike path crossing, and don't seem to see anyone who isn't enclosed in a huge moving metal[1] Thing. Then there are the cyclists dressed like ninjas, no lights, nor awareness of others on the road/path and brazenly ignore all signs and signals.[2] Phones, earbuds, and other distractions really just enhance the blissful unawareness of anything and anyone else that most people seem to have, and some of the pedestrians especially just seem to want to force one to slow to a crawl to get past them, even when they're going in the opposite direction and can clearly see you.

Of these near daily road hazards, obnoxious drivers[3], even of those makes/models which are synonymous with such behaviours are probably the fewest in number by a good extent. The stakes are just orders of magnitude higher given the mass, velocity, and the general squishiness of flesh and bone compared to even the hard plastics at speed.[4] Often, the most overall dangerous acts by many drivers happen because they want to *avoid* colliding with someone who is far squishier, such as stopping in the middle of a turn because some daft fool decides to start crossing after they had started to turn. Same with those trying to be polite by waiting for stopped cyclists to proceed regardless of normal right of way. I'd honestly feel safer staying stopped while the driver proceeds/turns, assuming that it's their "turn". The near silence of EVs does increase risk, particularly when they're behind someone or if that person can't easily see it, and using a giant iPad instead of tactile controls probably doesn't help. Especially with cities and suburbs designed around cars and not people, the number of terrible drivers is always going to be higher than it needs to be, simply because training and licensing standards are going to be, by necessity, lower than in places where other modes of transport are more viable. At least if the clueless were forced to walk/bike, the number of serious injuries and deaths would drop. But that's a planning issue as much as anything else.

[1] Metal, plastic and glass, in varying ratios.

[2] I'll admit to not stopping all of the time, provided that I have a clear enough view of the intersection and there is absolutely NO ONE whom I could possibly collide with.

[3] The stereotype of the BMW or nowadays, Tesla driver does hold somewhat. As the cost of a car increases, the arseholeishness of the driver tends to as well.

[4] A problem not helped in the US, at least, by the behemoths with poor visibility, further lifted suspensions and the closest they've come to a job site is driving past one, a problem facilitated by "safety standards" that are only concerned with the occupants of the vehicle and not others on the road.

NYC Comptroller and hedge funds urge Tesla shareholders to deny Musk $50B windfall

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Re: He earned it

I guess one advantage of living near a University is that the local toilet stall graffiti is at least somewhat literate. Unfortunately, some people seem to think that ideas like "equality under the law" somehow equate to all views being equal, and giving equal time to flat-earthers as they do sane people. Asimov wrote about the culture of ignorance in the US decades ago, when I was still a mewling poo larva, and it has gotten worse since then.

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Re: He earned it

It's not the only term they use that they have no understanding of, beyond something to call something they don't like.

Long-term supported distros' kernel policies are all wrong

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Re: FreeBSD got it right.

Not unexpected, alas. As much as Canonical gets plenty of well-deserved jabs by Linux aficionados, they really *did* make it more of a desktop OS. More things "just worked" with Ubuntu[1] and it became far more accessible to even only the moderately techie. Most other distros now are pretty easy to get going and use as a daily driver. The projects I have seen to make a *BSD[2] along those lines are mostly defunct, and never had the kind of backing that *buntu has. Getting a *BSD to the point where someone sick of Windows and not wanting to deal with Apple to the place that Linux has reached would need cash, enough people working on it, and evangelists pushing it.

[1] A family of distros that I haven't touched in at least 10 years, but was ground-breaking at the time for someone whose previous Linux experience was Yellow Dog on an old G4, and whose primary UNIX experience was and still is that proprietary oddness out of Cupertino.

[2] And Macs don't count for this purpose.

You OK, Apple? Seriously, your silicon lineup is … a mess

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Re: Not for the Likes of Us

Cooling was one reason that I am leaning against it. The Studio/Mini are still what I'd be leaning towards. But I would be amiss not even considering all of the options, and I *hadn't* yet with laptops. And yes, cooling is a big issue. The current iMac has survived all I've been throwing at it, but even so struggles towards the end of a long day and an integrated display (either laptop or iMac) means another component that can go wrong and would take the whole thing down rather than all displays (all more easily replaceable in a hurry) being on their own.

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Re: Not for the Likes of Us

True. But moving from mobile to a powerful laptop or desktop is a big enough leap that I have to be cautious. I don't quite have the disposable income[1] to take the risk on it until I was sure that it was done successfully, and the major kinks worked out. By the time the M3 or M4 hit the Mini/Studio, then I can evaluate whether those or the laptop suggested would better suit my needs. Regardless, I'd be happy to not have an integrated display as my primary one, since any display that I can put on the *other* swing arm of my display stand would give me a bit more flexibility when it comes to keeping my desk in order.

[1] Also, while I do admit that I like shiny new, or in this case "new" things, I also don't like the whole mentality of disposing of something that just isn't the newest model. I'll keep hardware as long as it's still useful to me, and when it's not, if it still functions well enough I'll wipe it and give it to someone who doesn't necessarily need modern computing power.

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Re: Not for the Likes of Us

There are other 4K+ displays out there, which is sufficient. 1080 is just not fine enough for comfortable photo work, and I'm more concerned about resolution and colour gamut than anything else, and I know that there are others who make something that'll fit my needs.

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Re: Not for the Likes of Us

That is an idea. It's still a ways away, and that might work, although I'd probably go full docking station if I did. I tend to hate Apple's keyboards[1] though, so I would need a decent one for on the go as well. Either way, I'd need a new primary display, and I guess that I'll see when I get there.

[1] Although my mechanical keyboard mimics the design of the full ones that came with the G5s, the internals are much nicer.

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Re: Not for the Likes of Us

Sorta. My current iMac (2019 27") is getting long in the tooth, so I'm in the early stages of socking away money for a replacement desktop.[1] By the time I have said cash, a midrange Mac Studio or even perhaps a high-end Mini will probably will have a beefier version of it, and it'll be more mature then as well. While I may not give a shit about the new iPads with more power than a limited tablet OS can really take advantage of, a new desktop on a now mature platform is something that future me *can* make use of.

[1] I wasn't even going to consider it previously unless I suffered catastrophic hardware failure[2] for the M1 or M2 anyway. I may use their kit, but I'm never going to get a first-gen anything, since I don't want to pay Apple prices to basically beta test for them.

[2] Which would necessitate financing which I'd rather avoid otherwise.

Computer sprinkled with exotic chemicals produced super-problems, not super-powers

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Re: The upcoming court case ?

That is one thing that I always loved about traditional photography. Although I did encounter from time to time snobs who said that it wasn't a "real"[1] art, they've clearly never spent time in a darkroom where it isn't just art, but mad science. And the mad science has included making terrible mistakes and some interesting discoveries when trying to "fix" them. In one case, the "fix" didn't work remotely as intended, but produced a result that was brilliant in its own right so was a technique that I'd be willing to reproduce.[2]

[1] Nevermind that I had a collection of very fine paint brushes, the sort TT game lovers use to paint minis for very fine selective bleaching/toning/tinting. My best prints involved quite a bit of "painting" with chemicals.

[2] Digression for the photo buffs. I had an assignment due that night, woke up after a long night at a bar, and really should have tried waking up and at least hydrating before I even tried working on it. I mistakenly poured fixer into an undeveloped film canister, immediately realised my mistake, dumped it and even with over-development, the film was almost a loss. There was just enough density in parts that I could use a chromium intensifier to get some high contrast prints with tons of "artistic" grain.

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Re: The upcoming court case ?

As someone who spent years doing traditional darkroom photography, I read a lot of chemical safety sheets and part of the education involved what can and cannot safely go down drains. The bits that could be done at home meant that I had several plastic jugs full of used chemistry that I'd have to haul down to either the college or the local community darkroom when filled, and yes, they contained various metals. Silver salts were the most common, naturally, but also those used in gold toners, selenium toners and the like. Stop bath is just an acetic acid solution, so that could go down the drain, same with the weak potassium ferrjicyanide used for touch-up work (not enough silver got bleached out for the solution to be a problem) as well. So just the fixer bottle would have silver, then another bottle for gold toners, another for selenium, another for Rodinal, another for Pyro.

I wonder which ones would leave pretty results on a hot circuit board, but that's not exactly something I'd necessarily want to experiment with.

Tesla self-driving claims parked in court

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Re: Wonder what took so long

Not just high cost things like cars. But they shouldn't be allowed for anything where there isn't sufficient competition on offer. Internet service is usually a monopoly/duopoly in most areas. We're down to what, three major mobile phone providers in the US? If any company (including others under the same owners, or subsidiaries, etc) has >25% market share, forced arbitration shouldn't be an option, and existing agreements to that effect need to become null and void if that threshold (or whatever number) is reached.

Microsoft PC Manager app bizarrely suggests Bing as a Windows fix-all

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Re: United States v. Microsoft Corp.

A thread elsewhere (yes, there are fora besides El Reg) had me thinking about the possibilities of what computing would be like these days if Microsoft had been broken up like it was supposed to be 20-some years ago. Even worse, just because it's such an established "standard" ensures that a lot of these nasty attacks on healthcare, government, and essential infrastructure are a lot easier to pull off. And yes, all of Microsoft's "integrating" everything keeps people locked into that shite.[1] It's bad enough on the desktop for non-institutional users when Linux requires too many sacrifices, and the other two main alternatives involve either Apple or Google. Enforcing the ordered M$ breakup really would be a step in the right direction.

[1] Such institutions also probably skimp on IT budgets. They're easy to cut especially when the sign that support staff keeping everything going smoothly is that they don't seem to be doing anything because everything just works. Support/security are just a money hole to beancounters and manglement until something bad happens.

HR expert says biz leaders scared RTO mandates lead to staff attrition

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Re: And HR make up the rules!

When my father died, I think I was offered five days off, but only ended taking three, all just to deal with practicalities and support others. While I generally do like getting paid to not work, I needed an excuse to get away from grieving relatives. Since I'm one of those people who don't really get hit by the full emotional gravity of loss and bereavement until some time later, I just used a few PTO days a couple months down the line when it really started hitting hard. Thankfully, my boss is very easy to work with and has always rubber-stamped my time-off requests (or even pulling a last minute sickie and admitting that's what I was doing) as long as I arrange any non-emergency coverage myself. And yeah, those initial three days she took care of everything.

Boeing might be criminally prosecuted for 737 MAX crashes after all, says DoJ

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Re: The problem

If we're going back to the Classical Greco-Roman period, that's not the only reform I'd like to see. Most of Plato's Republic is kinda out there, but I do agree with the idea of the leaders having strict limits on certain forms of property while in power. One of the few remaining bipartisan institutions is rampant insider trading[1] and cushy jobs/consultancies in the private sector after leaving office. Forced divestment for the legislator AND their spouse[2], and a blackout period for such private sector work after leaving office would put a significant dent in the widespread corruption. They're supposed to serve the public and not themselves, after all. And to that end, I wouldn't even object to them all getting a comfortable increase in salary that would be paid in full during the blackout period.

[1] And no real enforcement.

[2] If the spouse doesn't agree, then congresscritter doesn't get to serve.

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Re: The problem

Unfortunately, revolutions are messy, and either extremists or cynical and power-hungry manipulators tend to end up on top.

Wondering when AI will turn up at your work? Microsoft says look behind you

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Re: Still not convinced

Right now, more than anything else, it's a solution in the search of a problem. I suppose that one could use it to waste less time making a presentation for the suits to gobble up, but I wouldn't trust it with anything critical. I'd rather dig out my books on Bash or Perl if I have to write a script to automate some task than trust an "AI", unless it was something non-critical on a non-privileged account where any damage would be minimal and easily recovered from.

Tesla devotee tests Cybertruck safety with his own finger – and fails

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Re: Similar but very different:

Don't use them in the dark then.

America's War on Drugs and Crime will be AI powered, says Homeland Security boss

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Re: China

Now I need to dig up my copy of the "Illuminati" game, since the Gnomes of Zurich is one of the, I guess, factions (unsure of what they call 'em in game) available. My natural inclination though is to pick "Servants of Cthulhu". IA IA Fhtaghn!

What do we make of Apple's plan B for a down quarter – that $110B buyback of shares?

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Re: You put your finger on it

And there can be numerous factors influencing a brand's reputation, with hype, innovation, quality, appeal (whether popular, cult or just snob) and length of establishment/reputation being perhaps the biggest five. And those can easily blur together or even overlap entirely. It's quite possible for a product to be quite good, perhaps excellent, and still be over-hyped. And of course, these things can rise and fall. Your example did both, enshittification means plenty have fallen, Google for one *was* the best search once upon a time but is now crap. Hyundai was absolute garbage at one point, but put in the work to at least get to "solid", although I don't know which they are today as a non-driver. And yeah, the list goes on.

WRT Apple, while they definitely deserve most, if not all, of the flak they get, and are insanely over-hyped, I keep buying stuff from them because all of the BS aside, their kit suits my needs best, has been reliable for me for far longer than the hardware upgrade cycles they'd prefer buyers to have,[1] and also fills in a few wants.[2] That said, I do wish they were using those piles of cash to do real R&D, make their kit even slightly more affordable, or even just pay workers more than give even more cash to execs/major shareholders, but that's another discussion entirely.

[1] It's partially for economic reasons, but also because I simply don't see the point in replacing anything that is still fit for whatever purposes I'm throwing at it.

[2] In some regards, I find that their baked-in restrictions less chafing by far than feeling confined to their kit because the alternatives mean *more* compromises that I'm unwilling to make. I want at least the option to use Linux or de-Googled android for everything without having to give up certain essentials.

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It's a thorny issue, and sometimes the distinctions between fame, snob appeal and earned reputation is blurry. Am I typing this on a Thinkpad because the brand, or at least that of the product line means fancy, or because they've established that it's a quality product, albeit a more expensive one[1]. Are my phone, desktop computer and tablet Apple because I'm a sucker/cultist, because their kit has been very reliable in my experience, because it's UNIX that still runs stuff like Photoshop, or some combination thereof? Same goes with saving for Leica or Hasselblad camera equipment.[2] All of these things have brand name fame/cachet, and all have reputations for both quality and "arm and a leg" pricing.

[1] Although, I must admit, I'm typing this on a Thinkpad because I inherited it a couple of years ago.

[2] I must admit that has a bit of a "white whale" level of obsession for me, and has for some time. I *had* an M6 that got stolen following a betrayal.

Relax, Google's drop in search market share in April was just an illusion

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Re: "an increase in Search usage...

Startpage for me as well. It does seem harder for the crap creators to game metasearch/aggregator sites.

Software support chap survived breaking his customer

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Re: Ouch!

That was a great episode, and though I love Sandi,[1] I still miss Stephen sometimes. Sorry, I'm digressing. But I loved seeing the two of them bantering about, clearly good enough friends that she could get away with teasing him a bit.

[1] Out of the frequent panelists on the show, I couldn't see anyone but her taking on the mantle. The first series she did seemed a little uneven to me, and that was probably a combination of her finding her footing in the role and my own internal adjustment.

Musk moves Tesla's goalposts, investors happily move shares higher

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Re: A Fool And Their Money

Good question. Probably more than a few inspirations for that one. And it really is about selling the sizzle regardless of the underlying product. My direct thought processes involved Moist von Lipwig explaining to the stick-in-the-mud banker why he was inclined to give Mr. Dibbler a loan. Even *after* showing his arse in public and alienating a lot of people, Musk is excellent at selling that sizzle. I'd argue even moreso than the late, reality-distorting Steve Jobs, merely because Jobs was a perfectionist[1] when it came to the product itself. Tesla, not so much; it's more sizzle than sausage.

[1] Even if Apple kit isn't everyone's cup of tea and has had its own problems, and the company gives plenty of people good reason to hate it, I *still* hear confessed Apple-haters expressing the occasional envy.

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Re: A Fool And Their Money

And yet, there are still plenty of people who keep buying "sausage inna bun" from CMOT Dibbler, despite all previous evidence.

Turns out teaching criminals to write web code keeps them out of prison

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Re: Yea, a big improvement

I work in transitional housing for people with SUDs[1] and most are ex-cons. One guy was translating textbooks into braille while inside, and the company not only developed those skills within him, but gave him some fairly significant grant money once released to get the office setup needed to continue that work. Having people get released with something to do that isn't just "productive", or giving them income, but also a future and sense of fulfilment really does help prevent them from going back.

[1] Substance Use Disorder

Digital Realty wants to turn Irish datacenters into grid-stabilizing power jugglers

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Re: Second-life batteries

Good to know. Also rather sad to hear.

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