Reply to post: Re: how do you measure a change of 1/10,000 of a proton diameter with a laser?

Boffins' gravitational wave detection hat trick blows open astronomy

ElectricRook

Re: how do you measure a change of 1/10,000 of a proton diameter with a laser?

There's a lot about this that seems a little too precise. Two black holes collided 1.3 billion light years away, and we know how much energy it put into a wave we have never measured before?

Seems more likely that some kid was banging mud off of his shoes in Fish Kill Montana. Meanwhile we are on a planet with a thin rocky crust floating on a soft flexible core, the orbit of our moon is causing very strong gravity waves moving millions of tons of water every second, pulling and pushing on the tectonic plates, causing them to flex constantly grinding the boundaries of said plates.

If the gravity of our moon can cause such distortion visible to the naked eye, how come that is not what we measured?

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