back to article iFixit divorces Samsung over lack of real commitment to DIY repair program

iFixit and Samsung are breaking up, ending efforts to provide better tools, parts, and resources for DIY repairs that began almost two years ago. The electronics repair outfit declared earlier today it was severing ties with the South Korean giant, saying Samsung lacked commitment to making repairs of its hardware easier. "It …

  1. TReko

    No money in fixing things

    Samsung doesn't want you to fix your phone - they want you to throw it away and buy a new Samsung phone.

    If it doesn't break in time, then they will stop providing you with Android upgrades, and lock the bootloader to prevent you from installing LineageOS which still does get updates.

    1. GoneFission

      Re: No money in fixing things

      Can't easily lock people into expensive leasing contracts for $1000+ devices if their hardware lasts longer than the contract term. I never really understood people's willingness to drop a grand on a smartphone when $300 devices exist that are repairable, perform just as well and have marginally fewer camera lenses, especially given most people's regular app usage (Google apps, Facebook, Amazon and a handful of games)

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: No money in fixing things

        "I never really understood people's willingness to drop a grand on a smartphone when $300 devices exist that are repairable, perform just as well and have marginally fewer camera lenses, especially given most people's regular app usage (Google apps, Facebook, Amazon and a handful of games)"

        That's how fashion and peer pressure work. There's also some genuine use cases for high end phones - the screens are better and brighter, the cameras are usually notably better than the midrange (as a visit to DXOmark will evidence, or simply looking at the output carefully).

      2. Anomalous Cow Herd

        Re: No money in fixing things

        Never spent more than £150 on a phone. It's a just tool not a lifestyle.

      3. Charlie Clark Silver badge

        Re: No money in fixing things

        Samsung is also competitive in the $300 market and the newest devices have 5 years of OS support.

        I got a battery replaced in my old phone last year but was underwhelmed by the performance – was a reputable shop and I had to buy the battery first but you never be 100% sure. While I think most people don't really care, making it easier and cheaper (in my case the actual cost of the battery was similar to what it was in the previous phone where I could change it) to change the battery whilst ensuring things like waterproofing still work is probably top of the agenda and easy to do.

      4. ecofeco Silver badge
        Pirate

        Re: No money in fixing things

        $300? I have never paid, and will never pay, more than $200 for a "smart" phone.

  2. jgarbo

    Dare I say it?

    Samsung is making Apple look almost reasonable, since the Fruity crew *only* overcharge for service and parts.

    1. Lurko

      Re: Dare I say it?

      Seems it's a cultural thing at Samsung - cost and availability of spares is poor for non-electronic goods such as their otherwise excellent vacuum cleaners.

      But actions have consequences - my S22 phone is coming to the end of contract, I'll not be looking at Samsung after reading this article. Which may seem counter-intuitive, but although I don't plan to keep handsets long term and repair them, I value the option on behalf of the next owner.

      1. Michael Strorm Silver badge

        Re: Dare I say it?

        > cost and availability of spares is poor for non-electronic goods such as their otherwise excellent vacuum cleaners

        Not sure if this applies to their "small appliances" like vacuum cleaners, but as far as household stuff in general goes, I've noticed that- in discussions about such things- Samsung's large household appliances (i.e. white goods- washing machines, fridges, etc.) seem to consistently attract way, *way* more horror stories and complaints about their reliability and general longevity than any other brand.

        Even allowing for the fact that Samsung is a large company with a large market share, they seem to pop up many times more often than other similarly-prominent names in the large appliances market.

    2. katrinab Silver badge
      Gimp

      Re: Dare I say it?

      Louis Rossman has similar complaints about the Apple Independent Repair Program.

      1. Herring`

        Re: Dare I say it?

        His recent vid covers the Samsung stuff. I like to think that I can swear at a pretty high level but he is starting to impress me

      2. GraXXoR

        Re: Dare I say it?

        Have you watched Louis’s recent Samsung rant.

        Dude could make a sailor blush.

        I always watch his stuff for a bit of ranty catharsis.

        He’s doing all the gods’ work for sure.

  3. DS999 Silver badge

    There was separate news today

    That Samsung was demanding that in order to obtain Samsung official parts, all third party repair shops provide Samsung with the personal information for the owners of any device they repair, and disassemble and immediately notify Samsung anytime they come across something repaired with third party parts. I wouldn't be surprised if that was what broke the relationship with iFixit.

    https://www.404media.co/samsung-requires-independent-repair-shops-to-share-customer-data-snitch-on-people-who-use-aftermarket-parts-leaked-contract-shows/

    1. David 132 Silver badge

      Re: There was separate news today

      It's mentioned in the article. I don't know if the Reg updated it; I can't swear that the Samsung contract was described in the article when I read it earlier today (but equally, can't swear that it wasn't.)

    2. Claverhouse Silver badge

      Re: There was separate news today

      Yes that is in this article --- and I must say that admirable as they are, that is one of the most fugly [ and barely readable 'white font on black background' ] websites I have ever seen.

      1. FeRDNYC

        Re: There was separate news today

        I dunno. I suppose aesthetics are all subjective, but (a) the color scheme is switchable, you can have black-text-on-white if you prefer; and (b) other than a bit of a penchant for employing unusual typefaces as "decorative" flourishes — like those too-large, ugly Grotesk headlines, or the random monospace type that crops up seemingly at every turn, in site elements and callouts — it seems pretty standard.

        I mean, it's certainly not the horrorshow dev.to used to be (it got better), or as annoying as Wired's odd obsession with translating their overdesigned magazine layouts to the web space.

  4. clyde666

    User details

    It does not seem unreasonable to me that a manufacturer would want details on who and what device is asking for spare parts.

    For a start, the manufacturer is going to want to track any patterns in problems. Might lead to identifying production weaknesses, or design flaws.

    Also to ensure parts are going to real end-users.

    1. Mishak Silver badge

      Serial number

      Surely all that is needed for that is the device's serial number?

      Why do they need to know who I am, where I live or what my email address is?

      The repairer is able to contact me, as needed.

      1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

        Re: Serial number

        They absolutely do NOT need to know who you are. It's irrelevant to the purchase of spare parts, and Samsung are nasty little pond dwellers for even attempting it.

    2. abend0c4 Silver badge

      Re: User details

      The transfer of such personal information to Samsung would be illegal in Europe if the customer didn't give their informed consent voluntarily - and refusing to repair their phone if they didn't does not count as voluntary.

    3. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

      Re: User details

      "It does not seem unreasonable to me that a manufacturer would want details on who and what device is asking for spare parts."

      Apologies - your comment appears to have been translated from Korean.

    4. doublelayer Silver badge

      Re: User details

      Your first argument, maybe, but that should be opt in. This one: "Also to ensure parts are going to real end-users.", why should they care and why should I care that they care? I want to buy something. They have a price for that thing. I buy that thing. Whether I've got one phone I'm putting the thing in, am providing them to others, or just love having a neat stack of spare batteries for a phone I don't have on my shelf, it's none of their business.

  5. Mike 137 Silver badge

    The right tool?

    "It's with a heavy wrench that we have decided to end our partnership with Samsung"

    1. Mishak Silver badge

      I hate to throw a spanner in the works...

      But iFixit did wrench the programme away from Samsung.

      1. Crypto Monad Silver badge

        Re: I hate to throw a spanner in the works...

        Or was it Samsung who threw a spanner in the works?

  6. imanidiot Silver badge
    Big Brother

    So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

    Like nobody saw that coming a mile away....

    Samsung is just as bad as Apple, Tesla, HP or basically any other big corporation. And unless the majority of people finally wake up and start taking repairability and longevity into account in their electronics purchases it's never going to change (ie, it's never going to change)

    1. abend0c4 Silver badge

      Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

      wake up and start taking repairability and longevity into account

      Judging by the amount of imminent e-waste lurking unused, though functional, in my cupboards, we should probably be asking ourselves more seriously whether we actually have a need for much of this stuff at all.

    2. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

      Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

      "Samsung is just as bad as Apple, Tesla, HP or basically any other big corporation."

      They're an order of magnitude worse. Don't be naive.

      1. FeRDNYC

        Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

        How so, when Apple build their devices with "paired component" software checks that refuse to work, or refuse to enable certain features, unless the exact component registered -- by unique identifier -- to that specific individual device is attached? And only authorized servicers can pair components, of course.

        (At least, that's how it worked until recently, when Apple started backtracking just after laws started passing making the practice illegal.)

        Even Samsung don't go that far.

        They may suck in different ways, but it's hardly "naive" to think that they suck in fairly comparable ways.

        1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

          Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

          Samsung is a chaebol; a conglomerate owned and run by a family. A highly, highly corrupt family. So corrupt in fact, that they brought down the government of an entire country by association; in addition to the CEO and a number of senior executives spending significant time in prison due to bribery and corruption convictions (bribery, embezzlement and concealment of criminal proceeds).

          Samsung operate a number of anti-ethical and in many cases illegal business practices. Some at consumer level e.g. retroactively and surreptitiously altering T&Cs to allow them to change the operating parameters of a product YOU own in order to increase their profit margins (Samsung Smart Device Ad Program), at jurisdiction-level (anti-competition and patent infringement charges leading to their products (Galaxy Tab) being banned in the EU and other countries), and worldwide (antitrust and corruption charges related to supply chain in consumer devices, racketeering and bribery charges against Samsung Heavy Industries related to shipbuilding and manufacturing).

          This is in addition to making products which are in some cases SO dangerous that they were banned from sale (Galaxy Note 7), and others that were patently unfit for purpose (Samsung Galaxy Fold).

          There is a big difference between business practices you don't like, and business practices that are flat out illegal. Samsung is not far off being the Mafia of manufacturing.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

      "Samsung is just as bad as Apple, Tesla, HP or basically any other big corporation"

      Not all big companies are poor in this respect. Almost all white goods makers are very good on spares availability and cost, most power tool companies are extremely good (eg Bosch, Makita), Nikon have always been extremely good on service and parts for their optical products, most car makers are exceptionally good on spares availability, although some rip you off on pricing, like Nissan. And some companies are just crap on service and parts, such as Canon's printer division, or Sony Electronics.

      Curiously, my megatank Canon G4511 printer recently stopped working with the infamous 5B00 error. According to Canon it needs their service attention (£££ so beyond the value of the printer) but the cause is a waste ink counter that needs resetting to a process found on the internet but not listed in Canon's manual, accompanied by either replacing the waste ink pads, or my choice of installing a printer potty so that in future it doesn't shit into its own underwear. I was particularly surprised to encounter this issue, because the whole case of paying more for a megatank printer and likewise buying Canon's own inks is that it shouldn't be a soon-to-be-landfill POS. Some newer megatank printers have service cartridges that reset the printer and replace the waste ink pads, but whether Canon, Epson or other printer with refillable tanks, make sure you know what happens when the waste ink pads are full - or the printer decides they are.

      1. Dave 126 Silver badge

        Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

        It's the same game, but with different nuances in different sectors.

        The only washing machines designed so the bearings can be replaced (bolted drums, not welded) is Miele, and their machines cost 3x more than rivals.

        Hotpoint readily charged me 20 quid for a small injection-molded door latch which melted, despite my protestation that a door latch on a hot thing should have been designed not to melt.

        A Hitachi circular saw can be repaired for 60 quid, a new one from Lidl is 50 quid.

        All cars are sold in order to make money from the spare parts. The spare parts are often bought by insurance companies, so it isn't clear to the owner. Building a car from the spare parts catalogue will cost you at least 3x the forecourt price of the car (not including labour, naturally). This was explicitly mentioned in Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

        Bicycles... you're probably on safe ground with bicycles, with healthy competition for most standard components.

        1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

          Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

          "Bicycles... you're probably on safe ground with bicycles, with healthy competition for most standard components."

          Analogue bicycles maybe, but most e-bikes these days have a large degree of custom parts. Some are manufactured from fully in-house designed components e.g. the Dutch Vanmoof, whereas others are built from "standard" parts in a non-standard way (Canyon, Veloretti, Cowboy) or use parts from China which look generic but are surprisingly hard to source if they go wrong.

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

          The competition to sell spare parts for bikes isn't that great; you can buy cheap nasty bits from the online tat bazaar of your choosing which will last a couple of months of summer daily use, or you can pay a lot for "mid-range" Shimano or SRAM kit. which will last a lot longer - If you're doing a reasonable number of miles a year in all weather, don't buy the low end of either company's ranges.

        3. Lurko

          Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

          "It's the same game, but with different nuances in different sectors."

          True, but I don't begrudge people making money. What I begrudge is when they do or try to make excessive profits either because they won't supply parts, or they charge too much for them.

          "The only washing machines designed so the bearings can be replaced (bolted drums, not welded) is Miele, and their machines cost 3x more than rivals."

          I'm not sure that's true, a search for washing machine bearings pulls up plenty of makers selling them, including for my current machine. I'm sure it's true at the bottom end of the market, but that's because many customers buy purely on price, and its cheaper to make.

          "Hotpoint readily charged me 20 quid for a small injection-molded door latch which melted, despite my protestation that a door latch on a hot thing should have been designed not to melt."

          Hotpoint. 'nuff said, that's the company who had to recall around 600,000 washing machines because of a fault where the door locking mechanism can overheat and catch fire. Was yours one that should have been recalled and fixed at their expense? If this is recent, perhaps worth contacting Trading Standards to report it, see if it's covered by the recall, or its a new problem that Hotpoint need to fix.

          "A Hitachi circular saw can be repaired for 60 quid, a new one from Lidl is 50 quid."

          Hitachi power tools are comparable quality to Makita and DeWalt, and whilst the Lidl and Aldi power tools are good for the price, you're comparing very unequal products. If my Makita breaks and costs £60 to fix, that's probably a better investment for me than buying a new but much cheaper product.

          "Building a car from the spare parts catalogue will cost you at least 3x the forecourt price of the car"

          Of course it would, and it should. Maintaining a spares inventory and distribution system is incredibly expensive, far more so than most people recognise. There's a need for take a risk on the volume of parts that go into spares inventory, there's a separate timing risk that the maker has to pay to make the parts but they may sit in inventory for a decade or more before a customer pays for them, a need for IT to track the inventory and people to operate the IT and to keep systems alive for many years, for storage in warehouses to hold the parts for years, for some poor beggar to go and check the inventory from time to time, for security to protect the warehouse 24/7, for logistics processes and contractors to distribute the parts, for intermediaries to retail parts and take their own cut, there's risk that a part gets superseded by eg a safety or regulatory change and all the existing inventory becomes scrap, that the inventory contains parts that aren't working from new, that long term storage results in corrosion, dried lubricants, perished seals, or even that the handling of inventory results in mis-location of parts in which case they're probably lost forever, yet still occupying expensive warehouse space somewhere.....a long time ago I worked for a motor manufacturer, and all that I've described is the reality for the materials handling team of a manufacturer. And every new product, minor or major manufacturing change means additional parts need adding to the inventories.

          1. IamAProton

            Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

            Rex/Electrolux/Zanussi/AEG (all the same manufacturer) do not have replaceable bearings anymore. (was looking for washing machine a while ago and got in touch with them, took a while but they admitted it).

            I guess other brands are pretty much aligned with perhaps few exceptions.

            On newer machines (but it's not an extensive analysis) I've notice there are more "metal" parts (lightly zinc-coated sheet metal parts) exposed or easily exposed to the laundry soap (near the soap drawer or the drain/filter); my guess is that it's better to have a rusty machine failing after 5-6 years rather than a brand-new looking one that needs a new tub worth as much as a new machine instead of 2 bearings and a seal that can be bought for 10€.

            Makes it easier for the customer to change it.

            1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

              Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

              Ironically given the article topic, my Samsung washing machine does have replaceable bearings...

          2. FeRDNYC

            Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

            all that I've described is the reality for the materials handling team of a manufacturer. And every new product, minor or major manufacturing change means additional parts need adding to the inventories.

            It may be the reality, but it's one they have to accept some responsibility for having created for themselves. And, worse, it's a problem that was solved 100 years ago by Henry Ford. Standardized parts, not just within but across model lines, would mean that having a cracked exhaust manifold from a 1994 Dodge Gofast Coupe SE Limited doesn't mean you have to find a replacement exhaust manifold for EXACTLY a 1994 Dodge Gofast Coupe SE Limited. But the way carmakers design model lines, the 1994 Dodge Gofast Coupe GT Limited and the 1994 Gofast Coupe SE standard both use exhaust manifolds that are completely different, both from each other, and from the one that fits the 1994 Dodge Gofast Coupe SE Limited. (Meanwhile, one of them is probably the same exhaust manifold used on some models of the 1993 Dodge Bettercar, before it was repurposed down to the following year's mid-range models.)

            It is that way, but it doesn't have to be that way. There is no reason a part like an exhaust manifold couldn't be standard across multiple car models in a given year, or multiple years of the same model. Used to be, at least sometimes, they were. But the norm for carmakers — increasingly so, as time progressed — became that they'd design completely new platforms made of completely unique parts for each model they release. Because when you're building an entire car model line, you're going to need parts in sufficient quantity that you'll end up building them from scratch just to have the inventory, so what's the difference if you make them custom parts? After-the-fact concerns like stocking and maintaining a spare-parts inventory is Somebody Else's Problem™. (Especially since many of them contract out those services, or spin off a subsidiary company just to handle it.)

            The same evolution happened (and much more quickly) in the computing industry. Desktop PCs were assembled from standard-interface platforms, and most components were replaceable using any compatible part from any manufacturer. Those gave way to laptops with most components soldered to the motherboard, but with a few standard interfaces (storage, memory, often a mini-PCIe connector for the WiFi module — though some manufacturers employed BIOS whitelists to restrict what you could insert into those slots). And those gave way to more compact laptops, along with tablets and phones, which are almost completely devoid of standard internal interfaces, so that nearly all parts need to be matched to the exact device model. (If not the exact device, in the case of Apple's component-pairing bullshit, which is the BIOS whitelist concept taken to its absurd logical extreme.) Laptops mostly still use standard storage modules (now M.2 connected instead of SATA), but that may be the full extent of their standard internal interfaces. And mobile devices don't even go that far.

        4. imanidiot Silver badge

          Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

          Not that much competition on a lot of critical parts though. For drivetrain, if you want anything remotely decent you're stuck with SRAM or Shimano. Chinese companies have been making some inroads, but they're not there yet.

          And whatever else in components is mostly healthy for "standard" components in the way that there are no standard components (or more accurately so many standards to choose from everybody's still got their own.

          And that building a car from spares is more expensive isn't strange. Making, storing and distributing spares so they are available to customers easily and relatively quickly is simply vastly more expensive than the relatively well planned and structured manufacturing of cars with it's JIT delivery of components. That is a simple fact of logistics and has nothing to do with fleecing the customer (mostly, at least for car or motorcycle components). Sure SOME manufacturers are sometimes taking the piss but I've rarely seen it reach egregious levels.

          1. Zolko Silver badge

            Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

            For drivetrain, if you want anything remotely decent you're stuck with SRAM or Shimano

            try Rohloff

            1. imanidiot Silver badge

              Re: So Samsungs supposed repair program was all for show

              O said remotely decent. If I wanted to pay "fuckoff" money for marginal gains over a Shimano Alfina, sure, I'd consider Rohloff. I stick to derailleur, bit more maintenance but not a lot (have you tried servicing a rohloff?) , barely any drive losses and one tenth the price for a decent spec.

  7. James 51

    This is why I am sticking with my Fairphone Three. On the third battery and second USB port but still going strong. Going to try to make it last still the Fairphone 6 is out but I reckon that will be at least another three years.

    1. The Dogs Meevonks Silver badge

      I bought the Wileyfox Storm all those years ago because it wasn't tied down to android. but a fork of it and had far better security features built in.

      I'd hoped that I'd be using them for many years to come... sadly, not enough people agreed and the company is no more. I stuck with Motorola mid range phones for a long time (before &) after that for the near vanilla android experience, 3yrs of security updates & 2 OS updates.

      But when I needed a new phone last time... I ended up with a Pixel 6 Pro because the 7 Pro had come out and the 6 Pro was the same price as a decent Motorola (about £400)

      I regret it.... But as I typically keep my phones for at least 3yrs, I'm keeping it for the next 18 months or so at least. When I'm done with it, I pass it on to my mum as a free upgrade for her (she's using my old Motorola, but doesn't get security updates anymore)

      I keep hearing about the Fairphone and I keep forgetting to check them out... There's a part of me that's wary of buying into a system that might not last again.

      1. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

        "and had far better security features built in"

        Security is partly a product of scale. Companies such as Google, Apple, Samsung etc can afford the investment necessary to make reasonably secure products; as a general rule, smaller forks will not be able to do this and will be rapidly outpaced by cyber miscreants. And then it's only because they're small fish (security through obscurity) that means they might not be targeted - but this isn't security.

    2. Dave 126 Silver badge

      Wouldn't be better to just buy a phone with more durable USB ports?

      Edit: and whilst we're about it, aid the durability by making the phone waterproof.

      1. James 51

        I've had it for four years and counting. It's not unreasonable for the port to wear out after daily use after that much time. As for water proofing, that is improved upon in the Fairphone 4 and 5, I just haven't had the need to buy a new phone yet.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        The failed USB port on a fairphone might have been it getting clogged up; that's what happened to my fairphone 4. Just needed the crud digging out. Oh, and my fairphone 4 has a user replaceable battery and is "water resistant" .(IP54) It certainly survives light rain with no water ingress. I'd rather have a phone I can't drop in the bath than one I can't repair easily....

      3. The Dogs Meevonks Silver badge

        I no longer have that problem since buying magnetic USB Type C cables. Insert the tip (oooer missus) into the phone and from that day forth you simply wave the cable in the general direction of the phone charging port and it connects the cable and starts charging. Works fine with turbo charging too... But I have run into issues using data transfer between MY PC and phone over a wired connection.

        One of the best phone accessory purchases I've made.

  8. Lord Elpuss Silver badge

    Samsung has had scummy business practices for years. I wrote here a couple of years ago about my experiences buying a Samsung smartTV; I had no interest in the 'smart' features, I just wanted it as a display; but unfortunately everything decent looking at the time came 'smart' whether you liked it or not.

    2 years after I bought it, I connected it to the internet for some reason. Immediately got ads displayed on the Smart Hub bar at the bottom of the screen. Disconnecting from the internet made no difference; the Smart Hub continued cycling through 3 or 4 different ads.

    Contacted Samsung to say what the hell; their response, yes it's in our T&Cs and you agreed to it. I checked "my" T&Cs at time of purchase (screenshotted the online version because I'm paranoid like that) and there was no mention of ads. They'd retroactively updated the T&Cs to allow them to serve ads, and pushed this out to all devices via a software update. I said I want my money back because I didn't buy an ad-supported device, they flat out refused.

    I was in the process of having some legal work done and asked my solicitor if they would send a letter on my behalf to Samsung, ended up getting 50% of the purchase price back as it was more than 2 years old. I accepted, but Samsung can still go to hell.

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Hold on…

    IFixit has a relationship with Samsung?

    Isn’t that…. Err… a huge conflict of interests?

    1. Yankee Doodle Doofus Bronze badge

      Re: Hold on…

      Only if the agreement had Samsung funding IFixit in some way. The fact that IFixit is dropping the agreement as discussed in the article is proof that even if Samsung tried to corrupt them somehow, IFixit stayed true to their mission.

  10. JavaJester

    Samsung Requires Third Party Repairers to Remove "Unauthorized" Parts & Snitch on Customers

    Samsung uses its parts monopoly to force a contract that requires removing "unauthorized" parts and snitching on its customers. In what universe is it OK for someone to take in their phone to a repair shop for an issue unrelated to the screen, then have that "unauthorized" third-party screen removed and have the choice of another unnecessary repair or a nonworking phone? This is nothing short of a shakedown by Samsung. Nice phone you got there. It'd be a shame if something happened to it because you used the wrong parts.

    1. Michael Strorm Silver badge

      Re: Samsung Requires Third Party Repairers to Remove "Unauthorized" Parts & Snitch on Customers

      > In what universe is it OK for someone to take in their phone to a repair shop for an issue unrelated to the screen, then have that "unauthorized" third-party screen removed and have the choice of another unnecessary repair or a nonworking phone?

      Assuming they haven't explicitly agreed to it in advance (*), I'm assuming it wouldn't just be unreasonable, it would be blatantly illegal and grounds for them to be sued up the wazoo.

      The agreement with Samsung was the shop's, not theirs. And it's the shop's problem- and the shop's problem alone- if they're in the impossible position of being forced to either break *their* legal agreement with Samsung or to effectively break the customer's phone.

      On the other hand... one wonders what the various national legal systems would make of such agreements that are effectively imposed on small businesses by a huge multinational exploiting its market share in a "my way or the highway" manner, with an imbalance of power of several orders of magnitude and no remotely plausible chance of negotiation.

      (*) And in many countries- Europe at least, I'd guess- I assume they'd be on very risky legal ground if they tried to sneak that something that major past them via small print in the middle of page 34 instead of making it upfront and explicit.

  11. Lost in Cyberspace

    Short sighted

    Cheap, official repairs can kill a market for cheap-and-nasty repairs. And improve brand loyalty.

    But I suppose if a company loses one big replacement purchase, they'll gain one from a competitor that does the same thing.

    Actually, that's probably why some companies have several brands. When someone gets fed up with the poor experience of one brand, the manufacturers get another chance.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Short sighted

      Ugh. Like glasses in the US. Don't like the half a dozen brands on that wall? Try this wall. But they're all made by Luxottica. As are the lenses, regardless of brand or optometrist. Oh, and they're your vision insurance, too.

      (If you don't believe me, look up Luxottica. Even the LensCrafters founder (also owned by Luxottica) admitted that the markup on Luxottica glasses was 1000%!)

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