back to article Vigorous US lobbying reportedly reversed India PC import license scheme

India was subjected to intense US lobbying after suddenly imposing a requirement that computer importers obtain a license, according to a news report on Thursday. India's regulation was announced in August 2023 without any warning and covered laptops, tablets, personal computers, and servers. Samsung and Apple halted …

  1. Pascal Monett Silver badge

    The USTR didn't like it ?

    Obviously, anything that gets in the way of US companies is something to be overturned if it cannot be ignored. No surprise there.

    That the Indian government found reason to take a step back is a bit surprising, but if the current conditions make the move harmful, that has to mean that, once the conditions have changed, the bill will return and USTR be damned.

    You might as well get ready for it. India is growing, and it has already proven it can make its own decisions. The days where the white man could have his way over the southern continents are over.

    1. yetanotheraoc Silver badge

      Re: The USTR didn't like it ?

      Pedant alert!

      "The days where the white man could have his way over the southern continents are over."

      India is a sub-continent in the northern hemisphere.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      1988

      Got a PT job in US college with a Indian company that had a dual business (1) rent out Indian engineers in the US while keeping their passports hostage (2) buying VAXes, disassembling and labeling the parts, so they could be reassembled in India, to get around Indian import ban rules on finished computers. I was doing disassembling and labeling. It was hell taking them apart, I can't imagine how hard it was to put them back together again.

  2. Lurko

    "You might as well get ready for it. India is growing, and it has already proven it can make its own decisions."

    Except that India has to take trade decisions in light of the fact that it has already made a range of commitments under WTO rules, and it can't just tell the rest of the world to "do one". As a huge net exporter of services which is not offset by either goods or services purchases with the US, the US buys $45bn a year more from India than India buys from the US. The Indian market is already hugely protectionist, and seeking to piss off your trade partners by being even more protectionist is a very, very poor choice.

    "The days where the white man could have his way over the southern continents are over."

    And this has exactly what to do with this hiccup in US/India trade relations? The US itself has to play by WTO rules, as the Boeing/Airbus case shows.

  3. Ossi

    It's easy to see a 'big bad imperialist bullies a developing country' narrative in this, but this is a blessing in disguise for India. In 1990, India's GDP per capita was above China's. China opened up its economy and embraced trade. India continued on its protectionist path. This is a clear example of why that doesn't work. India's most successful and most competitive industry is IT services, so choosing to increase their costs to protect a relatively unimportant and mostly uncompetitive computer manufacturing industry is just plain dumb.

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Other stories you might like