back to article Southern Water cyberattack expected to hit hundreds of thousands of customers

Southern Water has admitted between five and ten percent of its customers had their details stolen from the British utilities giant during a January cyberattack. This is on top of the undisclosed proportion of current and former staff that are also said to be affected. The biz, which provides water and wastewater services to …

  1. cyberdemon Silver badge
    Holmes

    As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

    ... I thought they meant it would be floating out to sea. Or polluting a nice chalk stream fishery, or washing up on a sandy beach somewhere.

    Now i learn it's all over the bloody Internet too!

    * not by choice, of course. As a Public Utility, they have a monopoly on the whole area that they serve. Having such a utility in private hands should never have been allowed. On which ex politician can I place the blame for that? One Margaret Thatcher i would assume

    1. Roj Blake Silver badge

      Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

      It was 1989 so yes, during Thatcher's time as PM.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

        I saw no problems in the 50's every time I just walked across the yard and took a shit or a piss in the Thunderbox which helped me start reading because there was always plenty of news papers there.

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

      Scottish Water is still in public ownership, and is also under fire for dumping sewage into rivers in ever-increasing quantities.

      It's probably the fault of those dastardly English tourists, coming over the border and shitting in Scottish toilets, overloading poor Scottish sewers.

      1. cyberdemon Silver badge
        Devil

        Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

        Public Ownership as an arms-length quango is different from being government run.

        A public owned company is still encouraged to maximise profit, sometimes at the expense of well-run public service. See also: The Post Office

        But even government departments can still be scandalously awful, I agree. E.g. the Home Office

        1. Blazde Silver badge

          Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

          even government departments

          You appear to have misspelled 'especially'. It's easily done.

          If the water companies were not in arm-length/private ownership they'd be dumping their sewage selectively in rivers running through opposition party constituencies, while MPs from the governing party would frequently be pictured proudly opening brand new sewage treatment plants in their constituencies.

          On this matter I'm sure a moderately serious Offwater wrist slapping is coming Southern Water's way. A stern letter might even get sent.

          1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

            Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

            A stern letter might even get sent.

            I don't know about that. It might make a staffer cry, and then there'd be calls for resignations for bullying.

          2. Mad Mike

            Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

            "On this matter I'm sure a moderately serious Offwater wrist slapping is coming Southern Water's way. A stern letter might even get sent."

            Given OFWAT have done almost nothing about anything in the past, I wouldn't bet on it!

    3. blackcat Silver badge

      Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

      I'm just glad that they've never managed to spell my name right and I've never bothered to correct them :)

      Although not heard a peep out of them so maybe I'm OK.

      Southern water are pretty useless. On par with SSEN. A house down the road from me was leaking water from the meter pit for about 4 months. When we had the cold weather it turned that part of the road into a skating rink.

      1. cyberdemon Silver badge
        Alert

        Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

        > A house down the road from me was leaking water from the meter pit for about 4 months.

        Which side of the meter was leaking?

        1. blackcat Silver badge

          Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

          No idea, I just drove past it twice a day :)

          As it was leaking for so long probably not the house side.

    4. Lurko

      Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

      "Having such a utility in private hands should never have been allowed"

      Believe it or not, sewage discharges were far more common before privatisation, and the reason for privatising was so government weren't saddled with costs and work of complying with the upcoming EU Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive, nor the various EU Drinking Water Directives. Back then it was the state owned water boards, and especially in coastal areas the norm was to allow untreated sewage into the sea. In addition to the tightening water treatment regulations, the state had under all parties and for decades limited infrastructure investment and intentionally allowed water treatment facilities and pipes to deteriorate, and didn't want to be on the hook for either the inevitable breaches of standards, or the costs of remediating the state's neglect.

      I worked on investment programme management for one of the largest water companies for a good few years immediately after privatisation, anybody who thinks things would be inherently better under state ownership is living in a fantasy land. That said, there's been a failure of regulation over the past few years, where OFWAT should have held companies to the requisite standards, noting that would also require higher water charges. I'm reasonably confident that the ultimate causes of sewage discharges come down to the fact the population has increased by 14% over the past twenty years, but the OFWAT permitted investment programmes haven't created 14% more treatment or pipe capacity. The same is true for rail and road, but we just tolerate the consequences of congestion and delays.

      1. cyberdemon Silver badge
        Flame

        Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

        > I worked on investment programme management for one of the largest water companies for a good few years immediately after privatisation

        Oh, so it's YOUR fault then?!

        How come the water companies were allowed to take on loans, and spend the money on dividends and executive salaries, instead of on investment in infrastructure?

        They could have built separate sewage and storm drains like they do in Europe. Population increase could have been *planned for*.

        But given that they split a large public body into dozens of regional utility companies, joined-up thinking becomes impossible, and the policymaking work becomes inefficient as is has to be repeated in each region, and nobody is going to waste money building a storm drain if the neighbouring utility isn't bothering.

        Ofwat is partially responsible for this farce, but that is what you get with a revolving door between a private sector and its regulator..

        1. Lurko

          Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

          "Oh, so it's YOUR fault then?!" How come the water companies were allowed to take on loans, and spend the money on dividends and executive salaries, instead of on investment in infrastructure?"

          I've not worked in the industry for twenty plus years, so no, but even now it's down to OFWAT and government to manage the issue of borrowing and dividends if those are actually a problem. Part of the problem is where the financial services sector bought out several water companies and turned them into debt-laden hulks, and it is of course possible that OFWAT were told to lay off these water companies because the financial services sector own the Tory party. Since then investors have had to bail out companies they over-indebted, and that's only right.

          However, in the past five years, the permitted return on capital allowed for water companies has been 2.96% so customers haven't been fleeced, and water companies have invested £13 billion in service improvements. If people want more, then prices have to go up more.

          "They could have built separate sewage and storm drains like they do in Europe.

          Since privatisation, billions has been spent on separating combined sewerage, but that's slow and very, very expensive. It was almost entirely built that way by councils during the period 1830-1930, and no combined sewerage has been built in the UK since probably 1950. Europe, incidentally isn't a paragon of virtue on water services provision, funding or water quality.

          "Population increase could have been *planned for*.

          I agree, but OFWAT planning has always been based around government population projections, and the projections around 2000 were about 5m short of the current reality. Any water company proposing to build more capacity has the funding cut back because ministers have to sign off the increase in water bills. Far easier for ministers to restrain investment, claim they've kept bills down, and then when the shit hits the river they've long since moved on or retired. Given that capacity for 2020-23 would need to have been allowed for in OFWAT no later than AMP5 that was approved in 2010, you'll have to take that up with either Hilary Benn (minister 2007-2010), or the current shower if you blame excess population growth on governments post 2010.

          "But given that they split a large public body into dozens of regional utility companies,"

          Nonsense. The water industry was never a single national body, through the 1960s to 1990s it was organised as regional water authorities based largely on the major river catchment areas, and those authorities were privatised as they existed at the time. And because they were based around catchment areas, it was almost NEVER the case that any one authority or company was making decisions contingent upon other authorities/companies. The only exception to that was on raw water resources, and that was all handed over to the Environment Agency.

          "that is what you get with a revolving door between a private sector and its regulator"

          You've been reading too much Daily Mail. There's some necessary exchange of staff between regulator and industry, but in terms of management not much at all. If anything this is a contributor to problems, because water companies and regulator don't understand each other well enough, and don't communicate as openly as they should.

          1. Herring`

            Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

            Part of the problem is where the financial services sector bought out several water companies and turned them into debt-laden hulks, and it is of course possible that OFWAT were told to lay off these water companies because the financial services sector own the Tory party.

            I am getting increasingly leftie as I age. Financial services seem to ruin everything. When my son got his MEng, he pointed out that his cohort had the option of going and doing engineering - making stuff - or taking their maths skills to financial firms - making rich people richer. That's where the big money is for engineers, IT folks etc. They suck the talent out of the rest of the economy. The demand for investor return results in enshittification of all sorts of things - not just platforms.

          2. Roj Blake Silver badge

            Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

            Now we've left the dastardly EU, we no longer have to worry about their nanny state directives and are finally free to swim in properly polluted seas.

            British sewage for British beaches!

        2. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

          Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

          built separate sewage and storm drains like they do in Europe.

          You've never walked around a French city and smelled the sewage drifting up from the drains in the street, then?

          Population increase could have been *planned for*.

          Like in Gloucestershire, where Thames Water has been trying to build a new reservoir for 30 years, but been constantly blocked by NIMBYs, who nevertheless complain constantly about hosepipe bans?

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

            You've never walked around a French city and smelled the sewage drifting up from the drains in the street, then?

            Mixing up France with the whole of Europe is a common mistake, often made by a certain kind of Briton who can believe three contradictory things at once - the UK is not a part of Europe, the whole of Europe is homogeneous, and what France does goes for the rest of Europe.

            The rain in Spain: how an ancient Arabic technique saves Alicante from floods

            1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge

              Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

              Mixing up France with the whole of Europe is a common mistake, often made by a certain kind of Briton

              What a bizarre comment.

              France was actually one of the earliest countries to have proper drains, largely due to Napoleon, but at that time they didn't appreciate the advantages of separating foul and rainwater drains. The disadvantage of being an early adopter, others learn from your mistakes.

              When I had a garage built in the UK, I wanted to have it plumbed for a washing machine, and one problem for the builder was extending the foul drain to keep the two systems separate, as required by local law.

              The previous poster implied that the UK was behind Europe, in not separating the systems. I'm simply pointing out that this is a nonsensical generalisation.

      2. Alan Brown Silver badge

        Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

        "OFWAT permitted investment programmes"

        Quality British government in action, the same kind that created Brutish Leyland

      3. cyberdemon Silver badge
        Windows

        Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

        > Believe it or not, sewage discharges were far more common before privatisation

        You'll forgive me if i say no, i don't believe it, then :)

        Do you have a source for that claim?

        1. Lurko

          Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

          "> Believe it or not, sewage discharges were far more common before privatisation

          You'll forgive me if i say no, i don't believe it, then :)

          Do you have a source for that claim?"

          Unfortunately not. I saw the figures working for the industry so know this to be the case, but when the state operated authorities were doing this they had but didn't disclose that data. Given the wilful under-investment you might understand why. However, you can see the results in data you should be able to find, that the number of unsatisfactory beaches halved in the ten years or so after privatisation.

        2. werdsmith Silver badge

          Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

          Sewage discharges were just done and people accepted them and few questioned it back in the old days when people used to get polio from swimming.

          These outfall pipes are very old.

          Things are a lot better now, but there is a suspicion that the allowance for storm conditions is being abused.

        3. druck Silver badge

          Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

          I'll give you some anecdotal evidence; one day I was walking through the village and suddenly I had intense memories of my childhood beach holidays in Devon, it was a particular smell that triggered the association, and as I walked around the corner I saw a large hole in the pavement with a barrier around it bearing the words "SEWERAGE WORKS". That made me realise what I had been playing in as a kid, and that was years before privatisation, and I've never smelled anything like it since, well up to that point.

      4. A.A.Hamilton

        Re: As a Southern Water customer*, When they said "Sorry we leaked your shit"...

        Well reasoned, rational and informative answer. I especially am not happy with the performance of OFWAT - a Roman performer on a stringed instrument if ever there was one.

    5. Woodnag

      National insurance numbers?

      Why did they need national insurance numbers in the first place? Why did they retain them?

      1. Claverhouse Silver badge

        Re: National insurance numbers?

        Exactly.

      2. David Hicklin Bronze badge

        Re: National insurance numbers?

        Employees?? My NI number is on my payslip, so how else would they pay them?

        1. Woodnag

          Re: National insurance numbers?

          Sure... but TFA says "Southern Water has admitted between five and ten percent of its customers had their details stolen..."

          1. I ain't Spartacus Gold badge

            Re: National insurance numbers?

            I doubt they have the NI numbers, or the copies of identity documents, of the customers. That'll be the staff. Why people can't keep a passport photocopy on file, rather than scan it to a computer, I've no idea.

  2. Will Godfrey Silver badge
    Unhappy

    But of course it was the Thatcher monster

    A Tory so blue she was positively ultraviolet!

    1. cyberdemon Silver badge
      Devil

      Re: But of course it was the Thatcher monster

      Well, of course there were other monsters around in the circus that was the Thatcher government.

      One BBC Radio programme I listened to a while ago said that John Redwood was instrumental in privatising British Gas. He may have done the same for other utilities.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_privatisation_in_England_and_Wales

      The Conservative government of the day had originally proposed water privatisation in 1984 and again in 1986, but strong public feeling against the proposals led to plans being shelved to prevent the issue influencing the 1987 general election.[15][16] Having won the election, the privatisation plan was "resurrected and implemented rapidly"

      So it seems little has changed in UK politics. Always implement your most evil and unpopular plans immediately after an election.

      1. I ain't Spartacus Gold badge

        Re: But of course it was the Thatcher monster

        "Evil"? Since when did privatising a water company become evil? A sense of proportion perhaps?

        Water got privatised because bills were about to massively rise, because there'd been no investment by government in water for decades. Plus we'd just signed up to a bunch of new regulations on waste water treatment, which meant investing billions in new sewage plants.

        Politicians of both parties underfunded it systematically for decades.

        Plus the ideological reasons for privatising it of course.

        However I would point out that there's a perverse incentive if the government both regulate something, and run it. Because if they toughen up the laws, they have to foot the bill to comply. So things get left, and of course as it's also often the government that collect the statistics, they're also pretty good at covering it up. Whereas there's much more incentive to regulate a private company for a department.

        A case in point, English water companies are copping the shit (ahem) for dumping waste from storm drains. Because politicians forced the companies to fit sensors and measure how often it happened. In Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, where the governments control the water companies, those stats aren't collected and those measuring devices generally haven't been fitted.

  3. Missing Semicolon Silver badge
    Mushroom

    Same old zero liability

    "Affected individuals have also been offered a free 12-month Experian Identity Plus membership for credit monitoring."

    12 months? That data is leaked for ever. The victims will always be vulnerable.

    Experian Identity Plus is expensive if you buy it. Victims will need to keep paying after a year, and so the membership for these leaks should be perpetual.

    Once these companies start factoring the cost of lifetime Experian membership for all victims, they may spend more than the 50p they currently do on security.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    "We're doing everything we can"

    Lessons will be learned, etc etc

    Email arrived in my inbox just after lunch, as follows:

    Cyber attack: important information about your personal data

    I am very sorry to inform you that Southern Water has been the target of an illegal cyber attack, which has unfortunately affected the security of some of your personal data, as one of our customers.

    We are currently conducting an intensive investigation into this, supported by industry experts and following guidance from our regulators together with the National Cyber Security Centre. Our operations and services have not been impacted and your water supply is unaffected.

    As a result of this investigation, we have reason to believe that the data stolen and at risk, and which relates to you, may include:

    Basic personal details for administering your account and identifying you, such as your name and contact details. This may include your national insurance number and date of birth if you have provided these details to us.

    Financial information including your sort code, bank account number and payment reference number.

    What we are doing to reduce the risk to you

    Southern Water takes its data protection and information security responsibilities to you seriously, and so we are bringing this to your attention as soon as we can. We are working closely with the regulatory authorities. We have notified the Information Commissioner’s Office and are in regular contact with the National Cyber Security Centre. In addition, we have taken further steps, with support from independent cybersecurity experts, to enhance the security monitoring of our IT infrastructure.

    We have also engaged a reputable third party to monitor the dark web on our behalf. They report that, since we were named on the cyber criminals’ site on 22 January 2024, they have found no new evidence of data potentially compromised by this cyber incident being published online. They will continue to carry out these checks for as long as necessary.

    To ensure that we’re doing everything we can to look after you, we are offering you a 12-month, free-of-charge, enhanced Experian credit monitoring membership. This service provides identity monitoring and helps detect possible misuse of your personal information. It also supports identification and resolution of identity theft incidents.

    [snip]

    What is the background?

    On 22 January 2024 we became aware that a cyber criminal organisation was claiming on its website to have stolen data from some of our IT systems.

    We had previously detected suspicious activity and launched an investigation, as well as enhanced monitoring and other precautionary measures. Our independent cyber security specialists continue to investigate.

    What happens next?

    The information we have provided is based on what we know at this time. Our investigation remains active, and should we receive any additional material information, we will contact you.

    Once again, I am very sorry that this has happened and for any inconvenience this illegal breach of data may cause you. We are working closely with the authorities and industry experts, to do everything possible to manage the situation and support you at this time.

  5. _Charles_

    They've known about this for 3 weeks

    .. and they've only just told us

    1. Ball boy Silver badge

      Re: They've known about this for 3 weeks

      As the communication posted by AC reads:

      Southern Water takes its data protection and information security responsibilities to you seriously, and so we are bringing this to your attention as soon as we can

      Beggers belief - but the 'we take your data security seriously' is the standard phrase dolled out each time this kind of thing happens. They must all go on the same PR course!

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: They've known about this for 3 weeks

        Given they've been pumping turds into the rivers and sea here and failing to tell anyone about it, I'm genuinely surprised this made it to email.

        This is the line that's sent me into tilt.

        "I am very sorry that this has happened and for any inconvenience this illegal breach of data may cause you"

        Which de-corporateBS'd gives "Yeah, lol, soz, good luck, have fun, k bye"

        Contemptuous

  6. frankyunderwood123

    Open a second bank account...

    This type of data theft due to lax security is so common these days, you pretty much have to take some matters into your own hands.

    I pay all my utilities by standing order, from a secondary bank account.

    So sure, my address details and whatever can be leaked online, but at least I have some security with my banking options.

    If my bank account is compromised due to leaked data, the loss will be minimal, as it only ever contains the amount of money I pay for utilities.

    The same secondary bank account is also used for services where I am forced to use direct debit - e.g. internet provider.

    I time the payments into that secondary bank account to ensure they arrive at the right time - and these payments are staggered, so there's never a larger lump sum available.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Open a second bank account...

      I get called a luddite, but I insist on paying all utility bills by cheque and post, for this very reason.

      I'm a southern water customer, but I'm confident they don't have anything other than my name and address, and a knowledge of how much water I use and how much sh*t I produce. They don't have my NI, DoB or any bank details.

      When BT tried to force me to pay by DD by imposing charges on cheque payments I ditched them and went elsewhere. It was the last straw from them.

      OK - I admit I do pay internet and mobile by DD, but as Franky says, secondary bank accounts are good for that.

      I trust absolutely none of the utilities one iota. None of them. Who, in their right mind, would ever let an near uncontactable, unaccountable company to have free and unlimited access to take money from their bank account? Oh yeah, lots of people.....

      1. Lee D Silver badge

        Re: Open a second bank account...

        "Who, in their right mind, would ever let an near uncontactable, unaccountable company to have free and unlimited access to take money from their bank account? Oh yeah, lots of people....."

        With an instantaneous right to revoke and refund the last three said payments, cancel all future payments, based only on you contacting your bank and asking them to and not even having to provide a reason why?

        Me.

        Because I want to live in the 21st century, if they mess up then one phone call to my bank sorts it instantly (proven on at least one occasion which resulted in Three instantly ringing me after I'd tried to get through to them for hours, and threatening all sorts until I actually informed them that they were charging me for a phone they admitted was never delivered, the contract (with the phone) never signed, and that I'd been asking them to report the IMEI as stolen for the last three months) and I'm never "at zero" on my bank account so a payment here or there doesn't matter even if it's incorrect, especially if I can get them refunded and cancelled in seconds.

        DD has safeguards that cheque, etc. simply does not have.

        I don't trust utilities at all - to the point that since buying a house last year I am literally planning to obsolete them all from my life by the time I retire, and reduce my usage of them as much and as early as I can feasibly do so.

        Electricity? Solar and batteries. More expensive, sure, but expense is not my concern, independence from "estimated" bills, outdated meters, no chance of upgrading, etc. are.

        Water? Greywater system and can eventually turn that into a full filtered system. Again, not cheap, but the rain collection I have is more than enough throughout the entire winter.

        Sewage? I literally investigated incinerator toilets for this purpose - basically an electric kiln that burns all kinds of human waste into a sanitary ash that you can put on the garden.

        Internet? I have a plethora of options there, ran my (very tech-heavy) house off 4G alone for 5 years without issue when BT couldn't be bothered to upgrade local lines, and I'm just waiting for any non-Musk satellite network to come along. Having so many options basically gives me complete independence from any one ISP's nonsense.

        And even now I'm working that way:

        Electricity - every month I pay their overblown "estimate" (which is amazing given that I read the meter regularly for them and know my usage precisely), refund any excess and spend it on solar. 50% savings each month, and growing every month.

        Water - I forced them to fit a water meter, literally 90% saving on water and sewage instantly.

        Internet - DSL, 4G with several different networks, and Starlink "on hold" if I ever need it (yurk!). They now rent the Starlink equipment/connection on a month-by-month basis, which is my fallback.

        But payments? All DD and credit card. Because the guarantees you have are far superior, cheques are long-dead, and cash is just a dumb idea nowadays. Plus if you know how to game them, you can actually profit from doing so... "0% interest pay in 3" gives me 3 months of free interest on money, while putting nothing at risk (I always have the money to pay outright for whatever I Pay in 3), but I get the product now, they pay for 3 months of inflation, I earn 3 months of interest, and no risk. Not to mention things like 24 months 0% interest on credit cards - I do the same and literally earn 2 years of free interest while they absorb 2 years of inflation... then I just pay it off. Even if I have to get a one-off 2% balance transfer deal, I'm still making profit just by shuffling money around that I already have.

        Sorry, but you're living in the stone age and if you are untrusting of them then you should want to be independent of the utilities, not causing yourself hassle when the cheque gets lost in the (marvellously reliable) postal system and then you get hit with a fee for late payment, a charge to revoke the cheque and the hassle of sorting it all out to send another.

  7. Spit The Dog

    There was something else going on with Southern water at the same time

    There was little or no water supply to large areas and people were being asked to collect bottled drinking water from supermarket car parks. Schools were closed for the day as they had no water supply. My daughter is a teacher in one of the affected schools. Strange coincidence?

  8. Tearsofthemoon

    The support offered by companies such as Southern who are hacked is negligible. Just saying that they will offer 12 months monitoring for free is just an abrogation of their responsibilities.

    I've been through this with my 80 year old mother whose pension supplier was hacked. She didn't know what to do , she thought that her bank account would betaken over and she would lose all of her money. She didn't know how to setup the account monitoring , i had to do that for her. She then checked her bank account 5 times a day. The stress it caused was extraordinary.

    Companies like Southern need to be made to step up and take all customers through a detailed process of how to protect themselves i.e. made to spend so much money that it hurts them enough to start protecting data properly. They also need to be made to provide compensation to everyone affected , lets start with a £1,000 per person for the stress. Until this happens companies like Southern and others will just view this as a cost of doing business and I would even suggest that due to insurance will not be heavily impacted.

  9. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Experience

    Got the letter. Tried creating account using three different sets of card details. Each one failed.

    Thanks Guys.

    Posted as AC for obvious reasons.

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