back to article GNOME Foundation's new executive director sparks witch hunt

Holly Million is replacing Neil McGovern as the executive director of the GNOME Foundation, although her colorful CV is leading to shocked reactions from some in the community. GNOME's new director Holly Million has worked for some years in the non-profit sector. She is former executive director at the Biobricks Foundation, …

  1. Paul Crawford Silver badge
    Pint

    I wish her all the best. Really if she just to stops stupid happening and listens to users it will be good.

    1. Ian Johnston Silver badge

      Since the GNOME project's mantra for years has been "Fuck the users", that would be quite a change in policy.

    2. aerogems Silver badge
      IT Angle

      The new GNOME ED or The FOSS hack's other half?

  2. jake Silver badge
    Pint

    Probably off-topic, but ...

    "The Reg FOSS desk spent time in Dublin, Ireland, while getting married last week"

    Oh, how lovely. Did The Desk find a nice Bureau to settle down with?

    Seriously, congrats. A round for the house.

    1. aerogems Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

      Maybe they found a nice hutch that compliments them. Or the missing half that completes their L-shape.

    2. Ace2 Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

      I think it’s pretty rude to compare your new spouse to a chair like that

      1. collinsl Bronze badge

        Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

        Unless they are one:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYJOfJQDMX4

    3. Matthew "The Worst Writer on the Internet" Saroff

      Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

      They are going to adopt.

      I look forward to seeing little baby Ikea.

      1. Dave559

        Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

        If certain illuminated manuscripts were read, the offspring might turn out to be The Luggage

    4. A.A.Hamilton

      Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

      Very grateful you pointed out that Dublin is in Ireland. I would never have imagined that. I was sure you meant Dublin just off Prince's Highway in South Australia - famous for its public toilet.

      1. Ian Mason

        Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

        It's necessary to point out that Dublin is in Ireland because Americans may read this, and they get very confused when a placename, that they have reused umpteen times to name somewhere in the US of A, is used to refer to the original and not the Dublin in Ohio, California, Georgia, Kentucky, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Texas, or Michigan (and I've probably missed some).

        If only the early settlers had possessed just a little more imagination, the USA would not have 21 Glasgows, 7 Edinburghs, 10 Londons, 7 Cardiffs, 16 Birminghams, and 27 Brightons - that last one clearly suggests a lot of people wishing for somewhere to go to for a dirty weekend.

        1. jake Silver badge

          Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

          I wonder if xenophobes somehow feel important when they post drivel like that.

          "It's better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open it and remove all doubt." —Unknown

    5. druck Silver badge
      Happy

      Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

      Congratulations and we look forward to the patter of little office furniture in the future.

      1. Liam Proven (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

        Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

        [Author here]

        > Congratulations and we look forward to the patter of little office furniture in the future.

        Thank you!

        FWIW, she's already 4 and she was at the ceremony. OK, in her mummy's lap crying because her shoes got wet, rather than carrying a bouquet as she was suppose to, but hey...

        She is named after a prominent woman in the history of computer programming. ;-)

        1. Wyrdness

          Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

          "She is named after a prominent woman in the history of computer programming. ;-)"

          Desk Hopper?

          1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge
            Thumb Up

            Re: Probably off-topic, but ...

            That sounds like the ultimate in hot desking! :-)

  3. jake Silver badge

    It's not a witch hunt.

    It's just a lot of private parties who are sick and tired of the corporate world attempting to turn FOSS into a dull grey, one size fits all goo.

    The FOSS world works better for FOSS when it is run as a meritocracy, not as a politically correct corporate swamp.

    1. aerogems Silver badge
      WTF?

      Re: It's not a witch hunt.

      And yet, every time I suggest that the FOSS world stop simply copying whatever Microsoft and Apple are doing and embrace its individuality by encouraging developers to try out any random weird idea they may have for a new app or way of doing things, I get downvoted. I've even had people comment about how they basically want everything to look like Windows 2000. Seems a lot of people want that dull grey one-size-fits-all goo.

      But on a more serious note, let's not pretend like the FOSS world doesn't have a bit of a misogyny problem. More than a bit really. Denying it exists just helps perpetuate the problem. Hard to say exactly what the radio is in this particular case since I don't give enough of a shit to read some of the associated links, but there are plenty in the FOSS world who wouldn't accept anyone who doesn't have a penis between their legs.

      1. Matthew "The Worst Writer on the Internet" Saroff

        Re: It's not a witch hunt.

        Not me. I want everything to look like the CPM command line.

        Old school baby.

        1. aerogems Silver badge

          Re: It's not a witch hunt.

          Poser! I demand all my console output be printed via dot-matrix printer.

          1. Jusme

            Re: It's not a witch hunt.

            Teletype KSR33 or bust :)

            <old git>I programmed my first computer using a hex keypad and rotary switches to load the instructions into RAM</old git>

            1. thosrtanner

              Re: It's not a witch hunt.

              Hex? Wow. Luxury. I remember having to program an IPL onto a machine using a set of switches arranged so you could read them like octal (1-3-3-3-3-3)

              1. Ian Mason

                Re: It's not a witch hunt.

                Luxury? You 'ad it easy.

                When I were a lad we had to program t' computer by hardwiring the program into it, in actual wire on plugboard. And we had to make the wire ourselves, after getting up two hours before we went to bed to mine the ore for the metal for the wire ourselves.

            2. jake Silver badge

              Re: It's not a witch hunt.

              Luxury.

              Back in my day, we toggled switches on front panels to load binary, one word at a time. It worked, but I can't say we liked it.

        2. jake Silver badge

          Re: It's not a witch hunt.

          As CP/M was being born, and long before it was usable, I was using UNIX ...

        3. Liam Proven (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

          Re: It's not a witch hunt.

          [Author here]

          > Not me. I want everything to look like the CPM command line.

          > Old school baby.

          Jeez. I am pretty old school myself a lot of the time, but I used CP/M and I do *not* want to go back.

          (In my basement is an Amstrad PCW 9512+ with CP/M Plus, and my plan is to connect it to one of my VAXstations as a dumb terminal, so that I can use a more grown-up OS on it. ;-)

          (Actually the meta-plan is to cluster the 3 VAXstations into a single VAXcluster and then try _that_...)

          The DOS shell, that is as far back as I'd go. DOS 5 or 6, or DR-DOS from preference, not MS-DOS 3 or something. I'd like MOVE and DELTREE and things like that.

          I was never a big fan of 4DOS myself -- in its efforts to extend things, it broke compatibility -- but 4DOS (or 4NT or 4OS2) on Linux would be great fun. :-D

          I would genuinely like a

          1. jonha

            Re: It's not a witch hunt.

            > 4DOS

            Well, I *was* a big fan of that (and later 4NT and TC), almost from its first release (which may explain why compatibility was never much of a problem for me) when ordering software in the States still felt like an adventure. And compared to CMD.EXE it was real progress, not least because Rex listened to his users.

            I've since changed OS base from W to L and after a short stint with bash I've switched to zsh. The learning curve was/is breathtakingly steep but it's miles better than 4DOS/NT/TC ever was.

          2. Terry 6 Silver badge

            Re: It's not a witch hunt.

            I remember in my early days as a ( new)teacher going with a group of staff to see the school's big, shiny new computer. A CP/M job.

            And their first impression was sufficiently good for them to become confirmed technophobes for as long as I worked there (and presumably thereafter).

        4. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

          Re: It's not a witch hunt.

          I want everything to look like the CPM command line

          CPM? newbie! What's wrong with a nice 3270 glowing cursor prompt?

        5. Arthur the cat Silver badge

          Re: It's not a witch hunt.

          Old school baby.

          Neophyte.

          //SYSOUT DD DSNAME=REPORT,DISP=(NEW,KEEP),UNIT=3400-6,DCB=(RECFM=FB,LRECL=240,BLKSIZE=960,DEN=1,TRTCH=C)

      2. Terry 6 Silver badge

        Re: It's not a witch hunt.

        Two points there. The misogyny is well documented. And seems to have relevance here.

        The first point, while idealistic and all that, resolves to who are you writing software for? If it's for the ordinary user in the street a certain amount of grey goo is probably essential. Stuff needs to work in the same way as other stuff, for most use cases. Even outside FOSS there's enough strange and unnecessary differences to make life more complicated for people than it needs to be. Within even Windows' and iOs environments there are idiosyncratic bits of design. Which the devs may love, but just add a moment of extra confusion for the users. As tiny examples, one of the programmes I use has the X to close the Window near the left corner instead of the right. I can't off-hand remember which one, so when I do there's just that small moment of confusion. And the iPhone apps frequently have the delete icon in different parts of the window.

        But within FOSS there's the problem that developers just following their preference ( or whim) leads to things like controls that the developer rather likes, but that don't work in a way that the user finds intuitive, or there being multiple versions of the same programme type, which are almost but not quite identical. So that the users struggle to choose which to use, and if they want to try them out the learning curve gets steeper because each one does th same things in slightly different ways. On the other hand other kinds of software or a completely different approach to the functionality of exisiting software may not get developed at all because the devs all want to produce their own "better" version of an existing standard.

        1. aerogems Silver badge

          Re: It's not a witch hunt.

          Who cares? FOSS developers don't have shareholders to answer to, they're not doing it for profit, so none of that matters. They are free to throw everything at the wall and see what sticks in a way commercial vendors can't. Sure, probably at least 90% of it will fail to gain traction, and that's perfectly fine. Again, this isn't a commercial enterprise we're talking about, it's a passion project. Maybe there's some little nugget in there that someone else can take and run with, and in that way, while their initial effort may have failed, they still helped advance things a little further than the same desktop metaphor we've had for like the last 30 years.

          Apple and Microsoft I can understand being ultra conservative. The last time Microsoft tried to revamp the UI, with Windows 8, it didn't go well to put it mildly. No doubt Apple was feeling some phantom pains from the lashes it took over the first couple versions of OS X and people who preferred the OS Classic look. But FOSS is, <ahem> free from all of that. If anyone is going to advance the computing paradigm beyond the last 30+ years of stagnation, it will be them. But only if they stop simply making bad copies of whatever Microsoft and Apple are doing and start trying something original.

          1. doublelayer Silver badge

            Re: It's not a witch hunt.

            Of course, they have the right to write whatever they want, no matter how strange. If they ask me what I think is best, though, I'll suggest that they write one of two things: something that's extremely revolutionary because they really think it's a significant improvement, or something that works in a comfortable way. Something that does something a little new but mixes up the UI for no reason could probably be better, in my opinion. That doesn't mean they have to care, but I still have my opinion just as they have theirs. A desktop that follows conventions is quick to pick up. One that tries something completely new might be worth the effort of learning the new controls. One that switched all the controls but doesn't do anything unusual is just annoying, which means they won't get to try many new things if users have ignored it.

            1. Francis Boyle

              On the third hand

              you can offer the user your wonderfully innovative way of doing things as an option. Maybe you passionately believe that having the close button hovering in bottom right-hand corner of the window provides some great benefit. Then implement that but allow the user an easy way to revert to what they're comfortable with. Of course 99% of them will do just that and your wonderful idea will go nowhere but since the alternative is losing 99% of potential users you're still coming out ahead. And maybe the other one percent will start a revolution. (Don't hold your breathe.)

              1. doublelayer Silver badge

                Re: On the third hand

                That was basically my point. Revolutionary UIs can pay off if they do revolutionary new things and the new interface is necessary to productively having those features. In most of the ones I've seen, the new conventions are just somebody taking all the stuff we have already and dumping it in different places. That's far less exciting. When I see the latter, I wonder what we could have had if that developer had focused on writing something that didn't already exist. They can do whatever they want, but it doesn't change my opinion on what helps and what doesn't.

                1. jake Silver badge

                  Re: On the third hand

                  IBM put an awful lot of time, money and usability engineers into coming up with a "standard" interface, starting back in the late 1970s, and released the concept to the world in the mid 1980s. It actually works, when implemented properly. Some FOSS projects use parts of it, IBM still uses parts of it, Microsoft still uses part of it, Apple still uses part of it. The entire planet is used to this interface. Why change it?

                  Sure, if you can really come up with a better idea, demonstrate it! (See Plan9, for example.) But if/when your potential users collectively say "YUCK!", perhaps leave it on the shelf until the rest of the planet is as enlightened as you are. (See Plan9, for example.)

                  Useful change is good. Change just for change's sake, not so much.

                  1. Jason Bloomberg Silver badge

                    Re: On the third hand

                    The entire planet is used to this interface. Why change it?

                    I once had an app which did an astoundingly good job of presenting a MacOS look and feel interface. It was great except that if I had wanted Mac OS I wouldn't have been using Windows.

                  2. Liam Proven (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

                    Re: On the third hand

                    [Author here]

                    > IBM put an awful lot of time, money and usability engineers into coming up with a "standard" interface

                    Very much this.

                    Perhaps I should write a Reg article on CUA. I will pitch it at my editor.

                    I already wrote most of the Wikipedia article on CUA, so I could legitimately plagiarise myself. ;-)

                    1. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

                      Re: On the third hand

                      Perhaps I should write a Reg article on CUA. I will pitch it at my editor

                      And then mention that Lotus Bloats utterly ignored the CUA standards to do things in its' own, often confusing, manner..

                      (Yes, yes, I know Notes wasn't originally an IBM product and they only owned it for 3 years but they could have implemented a switchable-CUA mode..)

                      1. Terry 6 Silver badge

                        Re: On the third hand

                        To give a more concrete example of the issue. I use (free) FBackup. It works really well for me. Except, when I chose to do a manual back up for some reason.

                        FBackup has a right hand pane that gives detailed information of what is being saved and an option to close the PC down on completion.So far so good. But for two things, which together make a right royal pain in the arse.

                        One is that most of the menu items are hidden by default and the other is that the progress pane will vanish if you click on the jobs list - but doesn't have an equivalent easy way to get it back.

                        The result is that doing a (rare) manual back up the progress pane ( and shutdown option) will be missing when I want it. I will know there's a way to get it back. I know it's a menu item. But I can't see it in any of the menu items showing ( because they're mostly hidden away). With luck I'll remember that there are hidden menu items, and with luck I'll hit upon the option that unhides them so that I can then start to hunt for the the menu item that brings back the details pane, which I'll recognise when I see it is called the "progress bar". All of these steps have to be rediscovered in turn, like playing a video game.

            2. aerogems Silver badge
              Unhappy

              Re: It's not a witch hunt.

              And woosh goes the point over your head.

              1. doublelayer Silver badge

                Re: It's not a witch hunt.

                If you read my reply and think I've missed it, then I'm afraid it really has. Perhaps you could be so kind as to tell me what I missed? What I see in your comment are two points:

                1. You would like open source developers to make new and unusual things, ignoring conventions if they feel like it.

                2. You don't think anyone should tell them otherwise, since they're open source developers and I have no reason to give them instructions.

                I disagree with point 1, unless their changes are there to add unusual features, because I think that changes without features just annoys the users. I agree on point 2 that they have the choice to do whatever they want, ignoring any suggestions I might provide them. I'll still state my opinion as you have done, but they have no reason to listen or follow.

                1. Terry 6 Silver badge

                  Re: It's not a witch hunt.

                  Ultimately it's the techie equivalent of consciously writing the novel that no one wants to read v trying to be the next Richard Osman (Or Dan Brown if you want to scrape the barrel).

                  And maybe, sometimes, occasionally the unreadable novel becomes a great ( though probably still unreadable )novel, but there aren't many James Joyces. Mostly though, they disappear into the great recycling bin of history.

            3. jake Silver badge

              Re: It's not a witch hunt.

              "If they ask me what I think is best"

              The thing is, I don't give a fuck what you think.

              I have been contributing to what we now call FOSS since before BSD was BSD.

              I wrote code, tested it, chased down bugs, created patches, wrote documentation, and all the other bits & bobs that go into FOSS because I am extremely selfish. I wanted it to work for ME, my way, in my time. Once it worked the way I wanted it to work, it solved a problem that I had, which more than paid for the time and effort that I put into it.

              Then I released it to the wild, without caring if anyone else needed it. It's MINE, it scratched my itch ... now, if you have the same itch feel free to make use of my scratching post. No point in you re-inventing the wheel to do the same job ... and better, it frees you up to work on something to scratch another itch.

              Thankfully, other people have many other itches. In aggregate, we have created something useful. Without money bags getting under foot.

              1. ianbetteridge

                Re: It's not a witch hunt.

                And people wonder why FOSS doesn't appeal to a whole world of users (and by "users" I mean people who aren't coders, people who aren't technical).

          2. ianbetteridge

            Re: It's not a witch hunt.

            "No doubt Apple was feeling some phantom pains from the lashes it took over the first couple versions of OS X and people who preferred the OS Classic look."

            And completely ignored them, and were right to do so.

    2. Yankee Doodle Doofus Bronze badge

      ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

      Well, after reading the Bryan Lunduke article that Liam linked to, I think it's safe to say that nobody should be describing the new Executive Director as a dull grey, one size fits all goo. It's quite possible that she is an experienced grifter though, which may be just what the foundation was looking for.

      1. Youngone Silver badge

        Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

        I suspect you're right. Anyone who believes in "shamanic spiritual hygiene" is either a grifter or an idiot.-

        1. aerogems Silver badge

          Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

          Or? You sure about that particular word choice there?

          1. Joe W Silver badge

            Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

            "or" not "xor".

            Sheesh, basic logic (boolean and philosophical, which uses the same notation and is maths without maths....)

            1. thosrtanner

              Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

              EITHER a OR b is precisely a XOR b.

              1. jake Silver badge

                Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

                Regardless of the logic involved, the word the OP could have (should have, perhaps) used was "and", not "or".

        2. chivo243 Silver badge

          Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

          "shamanic spiritual hygiene" Sounds like something you’d have the day after the massive hangover!

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

            And "shamanic energy clearing" sounds a bit disturbingly like the sort of damaging to mental wellbeing thing that a sadly well-known other bunch of not very scientific kooks are into…

            (Belief in harmless imaginary sky fairy friends or worldviews is (relatively) harmless enough (as long as they are harmless), and, yes, lots of FLOSS people certainly don't fit into 'mainstream' pigeonholes, so let's hope that this is a harmless enough appointment. On the other hand, it does sound a teensy bit like another step alomg Gnome's righteous path towards that perfect non-configurable interface with its one shiny button, which, when pressed, does nothing. Nothing perceptible in boringly physical dimensions, anyway.)

          2. jake Silver badge

            Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

            "shamanic spiritual hygiene"

            I believe the actual English translation is"brainwashing".

          3. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

            Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

            Sounds like something you’d have the day after the massive hangover!

            No - that's 'shambolic spiritual hygiene'..

            (Strangely, I've had very few hangovers in my somewhat varied life. Worst I ever had was after drinking a mixture of Blue Bols, Grappa and something else that I can't recall (and most of the label was missing). Blue/green vomit is very much not a desirable thing.)

      2. jake Silver badge

        Re: ...dull grey, one size fits all goo.

        I wasn't calling her dull grey, one size fits all goo. I was calling the product she is charged with hawking dull grey, one size fits all goo ... or at least that's the direction they seem to be trying to take the project.

    3. Liam Proven (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

      Re: It's not a witch hunt.

      [Author here]

      > The FOSS world works better for FOSS when it is run as a meritocracy

      Oh dear no.

      The word "meritocracy" was coined as a satirical jibe, and is used pejoratively in its original context.

      https://www.routledge.com/The-Rise-of-the-Meritocracy/Young/p/book/9781560007043#

      https://press.princeton.edu/ideas/a-belief-in-meritocracy-is-not-only-false-its-bad-for-you

      1. jake Silver badge

        Re: It's not a witch hunt.

        I disagree with you, but I'm too tired to write a coherent argument to support my thesis.

        Suffice to say that I've seen it work admirably far too many times to poo-poo the concept out of hand, especially based on concepts presented in a book published in 1958. The world has changed a trifle since Mr. Young were a yoof.

        Also note that I don't think that it works for every aspect of Human nature ... but I do think it works rather well for various FOSS projects.

      2. doublelayer Silver badge

        Re: It's not a witch hunt.

        While true, that doesn't stop the concept from making sense. Utopia was coined to tell people that it was impossible, and the society described isn't very great, but it still works fine as a term for the theoretical pinnacle of society, at least when we talk about utopian opinion. Thus, just because the term meritocracy was created to demonize it doesn't mean that we can't use or adopt some concepts from it.

        The book that coined the term had its own conceptions of how a meritocratic society could be created and what it might look like. It doesn't follow that anyone who praises the idea wants to see the society depicted, since few have read that book. Meanwhile, some people might want to try a society where capabilities and skills are more useful to success than wealth and connections, even though that will probably never change. As usual, if you take this or any other point about how society could be improved and stretch it to its extremes, you'll get something very unpleasant. It doesn't matter which attribute you choose to use: if you write a book with the premise that "The most [attribute] people rule the world with absolute authority", the end picture will either be utopian if you're naive or dystopian otherwise. A strawman argument of that nature can argue against literally anything you like, including positive things like democracy or freedom of any kind.

  4. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Hol(l)y Millions Batman ...

    I never expected we'd have to fight the Penguin and the Gnomes at the same time ....

  5. Claverhouse Silver badge
    Happy

    Congratulations on your marriage

    That is all.

    .

    .

    Gnome can go and die in a ditch.

    1. Liam Proven (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

      Re: Congratulations on your marriage

      [Author here]

      > Congratulations on your marriage

      Thank you very much!

      There was a party, of course, but it was quite literally dampened by Storm Babet, and ended up both later and smaller than planned.

  6. Greg Fawcett
    Thumb Up

    Congratulations

    Hope the party was epic!

    1. Liam Proven (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

      Re: Congratulations

      Thank you!

      > Hope the party was epic!

      It wasn't, but it was intimate and cosy... and a little damp.

      We ended up in the Black Sheep Bar in Capel Street, which I highly recommend. Best choice of beers in Dublin. :-D

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Maybe she gave up Shamanism

    and converted to something else? People are allowed do religious conversion you know....

  8. t245t Silver badge
    Facepalm

    Good Grief Charlie Brown!

    Holly Million the Shaman Artist - This site is currently private,

    My name is Holly Million, and l am a professional shaman, an artist an herbal medicine maker, and a micro-homesteader. My greatest joy comes from helping people to free themselves and bring their gifts forward for the healing of people and the planet.

    I have made tremendous progress in my own healing, and more healing is possible. It's all possible — and without being boxed up and pathologized. Mind, body, and spiritual wellness is a spectrum of function versus dysfunction. We are all healing. And we all can heal. The tools are there. Our brains are neuroplastic. They can heal. We can grow new neural networks. We can change our biochemistry. Life becomes wonderful after being hell. Everything changes.

    For me, my own high achievement and public persona wallpapered over the tremendous emptiness and suffering inside. I suffered from an undiagnosed auditory processing disorder, PTSD, and a borderline personality — so much shame, self-loathing, and suicidal impulses. So much pain. And I healed myself. Yes, I claim the credit Many came who helped me along the way. But it was that strong, indomitable, inner spark of motivation to heal that made this possible. I am here as a model of what is possible. And I am here to provide a blueprint, roadmap, and motivation to others ready to start or now within their healing journey. I can soy, it's hard now, but there is a way to heal, repair, and reprogram yourself. You have all the power.

    Eight years ago, I realized the best word to describe me must be 'shaman." A shaman is a bridge between the material and spiritual worlds, between the seen and unseen worlds. l am now a professional shaman. I am a translator of the esoteric to the personal. I am a bridge between what is mystical and what is practical. I make the shamanic arts relatable and useful for the average person. I serve as a guide and sacred mirror and creator of sacred space to help people transform and transcend the fear and trauma in their lives, releasing what no longer serves, to make space for Beauty, Order, and Love to enter. I am now the Shaman Artist.

    I want to help others experience their own joy and freedom and to unite with their higher purpose and what brings them happiness and fulfillment We need all of these gifts to be expressed in this world. You are needed!

    Here are just some of the things I do:

    • I do energy healing work on behalf of individuals, land, houses, and businesses. I can do this work remotely because everything is connected. We live in a quantum universe. My clients for personal and land clearing are located all over the country.

    • I help people overcome trauma and fear. I have worked successfully with individuals who suffered from recurring nightmares and chronic pain that were resolved through our work together. • I create rituals and ceremonies to bring the sacred into people's lives.

    • I work with children who are sensitives, helping them to learn how to deal with their abilities so they feel empowered and not frightened. I enjoy working with teenagers who are ready to grow and connect with their own power.

    • I train emerging shamans and those who want to bring shamanic techniques into their daily lives for pleasure and empowerment.

    I am also a practicing herbal medicine maker and love to integrate healing herbs with my shamanic work. I am converting my property in Oakland, CA into a working micro-homestead and herbal farm — Holly Wholly Farm and Sanctuary. The property grows sacred and healing herbs used for shamanic tools and herbal medicine. My products are estate-grown, organic, healing, and spiritual herbs. I sell hand-crafted, homegrown herbal products of my own design. This place is my joy!

    I am the founder of the Shamanic Arts Institute (SAI), which provides information, training, conferences, and workshops on shamanic topics. SAI offers three levels of a shamanic apprentice program each leading to a certificate. See the Shamanic Arts Institute page on this site for more details. I am planning to write a series of books, two of which are now works in progress. You can find more details on the Books page of this website. Thank you so much for visiting my website! I hope to work with you soon”

    1. Francis Boyle

      It's ridiculous

      but no more ridiculous than any other religion.

      1. t245t Silver badge
        Linux

        Re: It's ridiculous: but no more ridiculous than any other religion.

        Unbeliever, there is only the one true Church of Linux as divinely inspired by St. IGNUcius Richard Stallman and Eric S. Raymond is his prophet. As turned into scripture (source code) by Linus Torvalds.

        1. Liam Proven (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

          Re: It's ridiculous: but no more ridiculous than any other religion.

          [Author here]

          > divinely inspired by St. IGNUcius Richard Stallman

          Just checking. Everyone did note that the link in the article that said:

          «

          including that of extreme devotion to _free software_

          »

          ... was a link to the St IGNUcius page, right?

    2. aerogems Silver badge

      Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

      Yeah, no... I call bullshit at the claimed borderline personality part. You don't "cure" personality disorders like that. You can alter your behavior through a lot of hard work, which most borderlines refuse to do, but it's a fundamental part of who you are as a person, not something you can "cure".

      That said, I have to agree with the other commentard in that it's really not that ridiculous compared to other religions. Once a week, millions of Christians go to a special building where they believe they are partaking in an act of ritual cannibalism by eating a dead man's flesh and drinking his blood. Orthodox Jews consider it a sin to even do things like cook a meal more than six days a week and have a complex hierarchy of which foods need to be blessed in which order before you eat them. Muslims think that praying in a certain direction several times a day is important. Scientologists think we're the reincarnated souls of aliens and you can learn to develop superpowers. Is anything stated above really that outlandish when you think about some of the crazy shit the major religions believe? If you actually stop to think about it, all the major religions are fucking nuts.

      1. Clausewitz4.0 Bronze badge
        Black Helicopters

        Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

        When you put like that, those religion fellas look a lot crazy, indeed.

      2. Liam Proven (Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

        Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

        [Author here]

        > I have to agree with the other commentard in that it's really not that ridiculous compared to other religions.

        *Very mild cough*

        This was actually a point I was attempting to make in the article itself, when I wrote:

        «

        From this vulture's position outside of all religions – including that of extreme devotion to free software – all of them are pretty much equally strange

        »

        I do personally find shamanic beliefs very strange. But I also find christianity very strange and unpleasant as well, and I was very loosely raised in that as a child.

        The greater point is that Unix is effectively a religion too. Unix, and C, and things built in their image, is a culture: a set of socially accepted beliefs about The Right Way to do computing, and those beliefs define a community.

        Macs and macOS are a different set of beliefs, a set that originated before Unix had a GUI. I was a Mac user from the System 6 era, and it amuses me greatly that I can reliably shock and offend Unix believers by noting that I _prefer_ the Mac way of doing things to the Unix way.

        Around the same time as I learned to use Macs, I learned DOS, DOS networking (e.g. 3Com 3+Share) and so on. Initially for me PC DOS and Concurrent DOS -- the latter less of a stretch because I already knew CP/M, just as LAN Manager networking was a more natural fit as I knew a bit about DEC VAX and VMS.

        Later MS DOS, Novell Netware, OS/2 and so on.

        I've been a UNIX user since 1988, but I don't actually like it much. There are lots of things I prefer in the Mac way of doing things, and lots of things I prefer -- yes, rate as better -- about DOS and its kin.

        This is rank heresy to True Pure Unix believers.

        And the fact that it is heresy and shocks them is one of the giveaways that this is a religion. It's a unifying faith system, not based on empirical evidence but on culture and shared belief.

        But there are other beliefs, and other ways to compute.

        I have more time for the fringe schismatic belief systems than I do for any established church or dogma.

        0:-)

        1. jake Silver badge

          Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

          "This is rank heresy to True Pure Unix believers."

          To some, perhaps, but not to all.

          I think you'll find that most[0] old UNIX hacks will agree that horses for courses is the proper answer to "what OS is best".

          Fanbois, of course, are a whole 'nuther kettle o'worms. They usually grow up, eventually.

          [0] The likes of rms are so far out on the bell-shaped curve as to be statistically irrelevant ... but we need 'em anyway.

          1. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

            Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

            agree that horses for courses is the proper answer to "what OS is best".

            AKA 'pick the tool that's right for the task'.

            Or, in the Windows world 'pick a tool that does 80% of the task because that's the best you are gonna get'..

            (I herd linux, FreeBSD, MacOS and Windows. Having herded DOS (3.30), Windows (2 onwards), OS/2, spent a time as an assembler programmer on an IBM S/370, played with Novell and worked quite hard to be able to explain intensely techie stuff to avowed non-techies in a way so that they can either comprehend it or be confident that I know what I'm doing..)

          2. doublelayer Silver badge

            Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

            "I think you'll find that most[0] old UNIX hacks will agree that horses for courses is the proper answer to "what OS is best"."

            However, I've often found that many of them have a rather small herd of horses, and simply assume that anyone who picks a different one is an idiot. Generalizations are dangerous, but take a lot of the "old UNIX hacks" and have them all react to people talking about Windows and see how many of them suddenly have a different view about whether that horse is a valid choice. Some of them might turn out to have a more dogmatic view, though by no means all of them.

        2. aerogems Silver badge

          Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

          Fair enough. I can't edit that post any longer, so I'll say here that I wish to amend that statement to also include the vulture hack who wrote the article.

          And it's funny you mention Unix being a religion, because I find a lot of Linux "converts" to be that way. I went through it myself for a time, though I grew out of it. You can see it here in the number of downvotes I get for suggesting that the One True Path(tm) may not be just copying whatever Apple and Microsoft are doing. Or pointing out how people bitch about ads in Windows, but seem fine with ads in Linux, like asking for donations. It's always important to take the occasional step back and really evaluate your beliefs to see if they still make sense.

          1. keithpeter Silver badge
            Pint

            Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

            "ads in Linux, like asking for donations"

            Can you provide a specific example of such an advert? I'd like to have a look.

            Icon: to all starting new jobs or marriages

      3. jake Silver badge

        Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

        "I call bullshit at the claimed borderline personality part."

        I claim bullshit on the lot. She's a marketer selling her wares, and knows how to con the rubes. She may very well believe all or part of it herself, but she also may very well not believe a word of it. We'll never know, because there is no way to prove it or not ... religion is funny like that. Ask the TV or radio preacher of your choice.

        1. chivo243 Silver badge
          Pint

          Re: Good Grief Charlie Brown!

          Hear me now Brother Jake, I can help you! You will be saaaved! You just have to believe! can I have my money now….LOL

  9. This post has been deleted by its author

  10. Will Godfrey Silver badge
    Angel

    Well considering...

    The attitude of Gnome devs, this sound like a union created in... err... heaven

  11. cosmodrome
    Devil

    A Witch!

    TBF, a witch (or a shaman) seems to be the last chance to bring the GNOME project back to sanity. Of course the inmates might disagree...

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