back to article Singapore to phase out checks for businesses by 2025

Singapore aims to eliminate the use of checks, beginning with corporate checks, by the year 2025. The phase-out was announced by the city-state’s deputy prime minister Lawrence Wong at the Singapore FinTech Festival Wednesday. Wong described how electronic payments have proliferated in recent years, causing the use of checks …

  1. Sorry that handle is already taken. Silver badge

    Checks and balances

    It took me a moment to realise you meant cheques.

    "Removing checks on businesses... we know how that ends... Oh right."

    1. Will Godfrey Silver badge

      Re: Checks and balances

      Got me too at first. Made me think they were taking our lot's deregulation to the next step!

    2. Korev Silver badge
      FAIL

      Re: Checks and balances

      Yeah, the language downgrade completely changed the meaning of the headline :-(

  2. ChoHag Bronze badge
    Thumb Down

    > money that is issued with "specific conditions like when and where these digital monies can be used."

    What could go wrong?

    > The deputy PM cited the example of allowances parents pay to kids only being usable for meals and school supplies.

    Family. Where we learn what "trust" is.

  3. tip pc Silver badge
    WTF?

    Spell checker, not cashing a cheque

    Do editors check the content and spelling of these articles?

    A spelling mistake in the title doesn’t invite the reader to keep going.

    As a tech site, perhaps there could be some geolocation language toggle or even some autocorrect in the composer?

    1. LDS Silver badge

      Re: Spell checker, not cashing a cheque

      Did you miss the article where was stated that El Reg switched to US English spelling overall?

      1. TheProf

        Re: Spell checker, not cashing a cheque

        "Did you miss the article where was stated that El Reg switched to US English spelling overall?"

        Yes.

      2. sw guy

        Re: Spell checker, not cashing a cheque

        Here is what I found when looking for content of speech: https://sbr.com.sg/news/singapore-eliminate-all-corporate-cheques-2025

        Again, USA not knowing how is the world outside USA ?

        1. Dan 55 Silver badge

          Re: Spell checker, not cashing a cheque

          El Reg has decided to use US English even though British English is the accepted version of English in Singapore. The same also happens for news from any other country - Canada, Australia, even stories originating in the UK. All dutifully reported in US English.

          Even more fun can be had when US Customary measurements and dates are used in articles.

      3. John McCallum

        Re: Spell checker, not cashing a cheque

        No but that won't stop the comentairiat moaning

  4. Old Used Programmer

    When...?

    When was the last time I wrote a check? Today.

    1. Phil O'Sophical Silver badge
      Coat

      Re: When...?

      You mean like

      If status < 0 then...

      ?

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Check is a verb. Or a tick in a box.

    I’m just going to check where I’ve put my cheque. Found it. Check!

  6. Altrux

    Lost in translation

    s/checks/cheques/

    Didn't think Singapore was really getting rid of checks! I mean, laissez-faire capitalism and all that...

  7. JT_3K

    The only reason the UK did a tremendous u-turn on ending use of cheques is that the charity sector cried out about how much it took via the medium. As such we're still supporting them nearly a decade later.

    It's time.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      I doubt if charities get all that much be cheques now, the dominant model seems to be to get people to commit to monthly direct debits. (Although I always refuse and make one-off donations...)

  8. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Just realised I DO care about the US spelling, after-all

    When I first encountered the startling assertion the other day, that our favourite Vultures had decided to go with left-pondian spelling, I felt that it rankled slightly, but that it wasn't a deal-breaker for me.

    However, having just seen this article, and upon further consideration, I realise that I DO care, very much, and would like the site to revert to English spelling please. Not only because of things like the cheque-check business, but because I realised that this also means El Reg is now likely to visit the horrors of "thru" and "pants" on me, and even worse - may well start using Americanisms that are either unknown to me, or which have referents unknown to me, or which have the opposite meaning to that which I'd expect.

    This being the case, I would like to table a motion that Vulture Central seriously reconsider their position on the matter, and revert to the proper leg of the Trousers of Time, because American is NOT the same as English, and this site has done very well as an English English website (of which there seem to be fewer and fewer over time) and so there's no real need to make a change which is complete pants to their original audience. On further reflection, this seems rather akin to the US habit of making USA-ised remakes of popular British sitcoms and films because of the fear that Americans won't get British humour, which generally results in something bland that fails dismally.

    Oh, and if Vulture Central has stopped "Biting the hand that feeds IT" then it's not the Vulture Central that I knew and fell in love with when I first encountered it. This MIGHT just spell the end of our relationship...

    1. Mike 137 Silver badge

      Re: Just realised I DO care about the US spelling, after-all

      "Oh, and if Vulture Central has stopped "Biting the hand that feeds IT" then it's not the Vulture Central that I knew and fell in love with

      It still bites that hand, but in very small print at the page foot instead of in the banner (just a little nibble of a finger maybe?). I wonder whether the change has anything to do with the growing number of "sponsored features". Obviously, if one has any common sense, one doesn't bite the hand that pays one.

    2. Victor Ludorum
      Pint

      Re: Just realised I DO care about the US spelling, after-all

      As a right-pondian I worry about the US-ification of almost everything. Having been a regular visitor to ElReg since 199x, I am disappointed. My tutting shall become slightly louder, lest I disturb anyone from their Times crossword...

      'I realised that this also means El Reg is now likely to visit the horrors of "thru" and "pants" on me, and even worse - may well start using Americanisms that are either unknown to me, or which have referents unknown to me, or which have the opposite meaning to that which I'd expect.'

      I expect there are some who could care less...

      The one with the Kentish hops, please -->

      1. Trigonoceps occipitalis Silver badge

        Re: Just realised I DO care about the US spelling, after-all

        "...could care less..."

        This is a translation of "couldn't care less."

        By using American-English (every day more of an oxymoron) the meaning of the comment is made ambiguous. Does Victor Laudorum mean he cares and others care less, or is he saying that he does not care at all?

        1. Victor Ludorum

          Re: Just realised I DO care about the US spelling, after-all

          the meaning of the comment is made ambiguous

          That's kind of my point.

          I was giving an example of opposite meaning between English and Americanese phrases.

        2. Mike 137 Silver badge

          Re: Just realised I DO care about the US spelling, after-all

          "...could care less..."

          This is a translation of "couldn't care less."

          Not so much a translation as a complete reversal of meaning. If I "could care less" it means I care more than I might, which is probably not what the speaker intended to express. Such usage is primarily the result of sloppy thinking, not of national linguistic differences.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Facepalm

      Re: Just realised I DO care about the US spelling, after-all

      As a left-pondian, let me unequivocally state that in this instance we got it wrong. The vast majority of the definitions of "check" do not define it as a "cheque" and have nothing to do with a bank draft.

      It's too late now but US English should have retained cheque. "I need to check on my check" is just too confusing.

      OTOH, tyre is just silly.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: Just realised I DO care about the US spelling, after-all

        I tire of yank foolishness

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