back to article Party like it's 2014, if you can – that's the last time smartphone sales were this low

Sorry to bring you another item of news focusing on indicators of poor economic conditions, but analyst outfit Counterpoint Research has just revealed data that finds sales of smartphones have dipped to levels not seen since 2014. Ahhhh 2014: the year in which Apple debuted 4G in the iPhone 6 and gave the world its first Watch …

  1. Gideon 1

    Spelling

    "Reith reckons tho1se tactics"

  2. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    "bad economic indicator"?

    Or is it a sign that people are finally realising that there really isn't any need to replace phones so often?

    1. KittenHuffer Silver badge

      Re: "bad economic indicator"?

      Both!

    2. b0llchit Silver badge
      Devil

      Re: "bad economic indicator"?

      Not replacing? That will be rectified by software.

      1. Neil Barnes Silver badge

        Re: "bad economic indicator"?

        Aye, and that's the issue. Every 'security' update leaves the phone a little slower, a little less storage, and probably a whole lot more spyware.

        I wonder if you can get a read-only phone?

      2. Piro Silver badge

        Re: "bad economic indicator"?

        If not, by glued in batteries.

        My phone from April 2017 which I use every day has an issue with the battery now, sometimes if I try to film with the camera even at say, 40%, it will shut down. Very poorly.

        1. gnasher729 Silver badge

          Re: "bad economic indicator"?

          The manufacturer could reduce the clock speed when the battery is getting weak to keep the phone working for longer. Don’t you think that would be an excellent idea?

  3. spireite Silver badge

    Let's be honest here.....

    Is there anything innovative left to introduce to mobiles? We have the foldables as the last big innovation introduced, and I've hardly seen any on the street.

    Next up will be the rollable.....

    Both are niche, likely to be seen with w/b/ankers and nerds, but no use to the public otherwise.

    If it wasn't for the forced obsoleting by gluing in batteries, the sales would be signficantly less again. My early Samsung S pre-glue had several batteries in its life, because it still had all it's functionality.

    1. Alumoi Silver badge

      Is there anything innovative left to introduce to mobiles?

      Take your pick: removable battery, headphone jack, SD card slot not in the same tray with the SIM, dedicated back, home and close buttons, IR blaster, easy acces to unlocking the bootloader, root access, making any program removable...

      1. ecofeco Silver badge

        All the things they took away.

        Yep. It would be nice to have those back.

    2. General Purpose

      Is there anything innovative left to introduce to mobiles?

      Auto-hover when dropped.

    3. A. Coatsworth Silver badge
      Facepalm

      Samsung ads for the foldable phones are absolutely cringeworthy, as the company itself can't think of a reason *why* the phone even exists, much less why should anyone buy it.

      In one ad, the phone falls from a table and it allows a cat to take a selfie... ok I guess.

      In another, a girl sees the phone and then sees other things that fold (chairs, sandwiches, books...) and that prompts her to buy one?

      They are downright embarrasing, but an excellent indication that these phones are a solution in search for a problem.

  4. Binraider Silver badge

    Pray tell, what is the difference in functionality between a 2010 smartphone and a 2022 one? Better camera? Maybe a better mic. Batteries get fatter or skinnier in much the same way that trends with jeans go. Processors gradually improve, but for most users this makes little difference.

    The pace of change of mobile development 1995 - 2005 was a whole different beast.

    By now, everyone that is going to buy a smartphone, has a smartphone. Beyond that it's just turnover for breakages and obsolescence. Apple have smart people at their disposal; they can see and influence the trends of obsolescence, to adjust the number of replacements up or down accordingly.

    1. A. Coatsworth Silver badge

      >>The pace of change of mobile development 1995 - 2005 was a whole different beast.

      But that pace set a trend of earnings that must be kept. Otherwise some poor, poor souls in Wall Street won't be able to afford new yatchs.

      And if the companies can't maintain something as trivial as infinite growth, to hell with them!

  5. lglethal Silver badge
    Trollface

    Wow my timing is awesome. I bought a new phone this year, as the previous finally died. And I bought that previous one in 2014!

    So clearly, from causation, I must be responsible for the poor mobile phone sales market. Sorry! But dont worry everyone, I plan on holding on to this phone for at least another 8 years, so the phone sales market should pick up again soon. Just watch out around 2030, ok?

  6. ecofeco Silver badge

    Gee I wonder why?

    It's not like $500+ phones are not affordable!

    /s in case needed.

  7. Kevin McMurtrie Silver badge

    Stagnant

    The latest fad is cutting features and raising the price, so duh. No headphone jack, no microSd slot, no FM, no SA 5G, stagnant camera tech, stagnant display tech, stagnant or even rotting OS, no third party ROM support, no variation in form factors, and storage has regressed to only 256 GB. Almost every phone is indistinguishable from all the other phones made in the last 2-4 years.

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