back to article Is this you in this explicit snap? No, it's just Discord phishing

Cybercriminals are taking an old trick to newer places: Twitter and Discord. Users of both platforms have been warned to be on the lookout for direct messages warning them that their account had been flagged for bad behavior, in the case of Twitter, or, in the case of Discord, that X-rated photographs of them have been …

  1. Pascal Monett Silver badge

    "no-one should assume their level of technical expertise exempts them from risk"

    I'm not sure I totally agree with that statement.

    If your level of expertise is click-on-any-attachment-or-link-regardless-of-if-you-know-the-sender-or-not, then yeah, you're at risk.

    But if your level of expertise is I-don't-know-you-and-I-will-not-click-that, then you're pretty much immune to that risk.

    1. bluesxman

      Re: "no-one should assume their level of technical expertise exempts them from risk"

      Your faith in your own infallibility will be your downfall.

      I consider myself to be someone who is "aware" and "on the ball" with this sort of thing, but a number of years ago in a pre-first-cup-of-tea moment I clicked something I should have known better about on MSN messenger without thinking and sent similar spammy messages to a whole bunch of my contacts. Oops.

      1. Andy Non

        Re: "no-one should assume their level of technical expertise exempts them from risk"

        There is always something that could get through in the right circumstances. I consider myself clued up about various scams but I've been caught once with a dodgy PDF from a business associate I knew who I was expecting some documentation from. It didn't hurt my Linux based computer as it had Windows malware in it. Turned out my associate had been pawned by malware and everyone in his address book similarly spammed.

        On another occasion while waiting for a parcel from Royal Mail I had an SMS supposedly from them saying there was a problem with my delivery and it gave a link to a website. This was before such parcel scams became common knowledge. However, it did ring a few alarm bells so I looked up the website rather than going to it, and sure enough it was flagged as hosting malware. So close to getting caught.

      2. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: "no-one should assume their level of technical expertise exempts them from risk"

        Just takes a moment - opened email from pain on the butt colleague, while I was thinking about them, opened link in the next email about a car with lights left on in car park.

        I don't drive to work.... luckily it was a fake phishing email that out cyber security team put out.

        Since then, I've reported emails - even the genuine ones asking for money for the tea fund

    2. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "no-one should assume their level of technical expertise exempts them from risk"

      Yeah, hubris is tricky that way.

      I lost a bet once over an auto execute exploit on .jpg files as an email attachment. That was the late 90's. Tried to keep my foot out of my mouth over the following quarter century.

      We are stuck on Gmail and I still have to open a bloody message to "View Source". There have been script bugs that have slipped through their sanitation and sandboxing. On a long enough time line it will happen again.

      Try a new rule of thumb on:

      Do your best, but you can do everything right and still get pwned, unless you do nothing at all. Those are the only choices. The rest is out of your hands.

  2. batfink Silver badge

    Danger to others

    If someone somehow publishes an X-rated photograph alleged to be me, it's liable to be much more traumatic for any viewer than it is for me.

    1. Gene Cash Silver badge

      Re: Danger to others

      "People know I NEVER looked that good..."

    2. CountCadaver

      Re: Danger to others

      I'd just shrug.....

      After surgery on my reproductive bits about a rugby teams worth of medics have seen it, before during and after

      So it's become....big whoop....

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Paris Hilton

        Re: Danger to others

        So are they actually leather?

    3. Sherrie Ludwig

      Re: Danger to others

      If someone somehow publishes an X-rated photograph alleged to be me, it's liable to be much more traumatic for any viewer than it is for me.

      Yeah, me too, that would carry its own punishment!

  3. Grunchy Bronze badge

    I dropped Twitter after Musk was trying to take it over, I'm tired of these internet assholes thinking they run the world.

    I'm out!

  4. vogon00

    Take social media seriously?

    MalwareBytes recommends not taking any social media messages too seriously.

    +1 to MalwareBytes for the sane advise.

    +10 to me for not reading any of that shite in the first place.

  5. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    And in today's episode of Captain Obvious…

    > MalwareBytes recommends not taking any social media messages too seriously

  6. Ian Mason

    Dissapointing

    > Back in the day, one of The Register's own vultures was on the receiving end of one of these scams: an email blackmailing the mark into paying a ransom to prevent the leak of an explicit, compromising video that didn't actually exist.

    I find this disappointing. Back in the proper "back in the day" the Reg's contributors were entertaining enough that there was very little likelihood that wasn't kompromat a plenty to be had on them.

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