back to article Having trouble finding power supplies or server racks? You're not the only one

Power and thermal management equipment essential to building datacenters is in short supply, with delays of months on shipments – a situation that's likely to persist well into 2023, Dell'Oro Group reports. The analyst firm's latest datacenter physical infrastructure report – which tracks an array of basic but essential …

  1. 43300

    Switches as well - massive delays on them. I ordered some in January (Dell), and the delivery date is currently October (having been moved several times).

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