back to article Tim Hortons collected location data constantly, without consent, report finds

From May 2019 through August 2020, the mobile app published by multinational restaurant chain Tim Hortons surveilled customers constantly by gathering their location data without valid consent, according to a Canadian government investigation. In a report published Wednesday, Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC) of Canada …

  1. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    As a Canadian

    I'm mildly furious about this, sorry eh

    1. Gene Cash Silver badge

      Re: As a Canadian

      AvE is gonna be pissed.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        Re: As a Canadian

        After his truck convoy support videos I don't think many el'reg readers are watching

  2. Pascal Monett Silver badge

    Tim Hortons

    "identify when the user was visiting a Tim Hortons competitor"

    Even if I were to admit that this information could be interesting, what were they doing with it ? Charging more the next time the customer came to them ?

    This is a clear violation of every moral rule that exists. Tim Hortons is a restaurant chain, not the NSA. Where their customers go is not Tim Hortons' business in any way, shape or form.

    Tim Hortons. Another company on my personal blacklist (not that it matters).

    1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

      Re: Tim Hortons

      "This is a clear violation of every moral rule that exists. Tim Hortons is a restaurant chain, not the NSA. Where their customers go is not Tim Hortons' business in any way, shape or form."

      Absolutely! At most, an app of this type might monitor location data locally within the phone and then use that when you actively use the app to tell you about nearby outlets and special deals. There's no need for any further use of location data. They don't even need to know when or for how long you enter one of their outlets. The local manager should already have enough of that information to be useful without any further fine graining. The individual outlet profits/losses will tell you if that site is popular or not.

    2. iron Silver badge

      Re: Tim Hortons

      You should add all fast food and coffee chains to that list, all of them have apps. Why do you think they are spending money developing and running apps when their business is food & drink? All those apps are tracking your location - to see how often you visit a competitor (and which) is why they are doing it.

      Also add all shopping malls. They use GPS, WiFi, Bluetooth and the help of your mobile network to track your phone as you walk round the mall and see which stores you visit. They plot your route and use it to increase advertising in high traffic areas. They even track you after you leave to gather demographics data on their customers.

      Speaking of your mobile network they are recording your location at all times and selling that data to public transport companies, local government, state government, civil engineering companies and more. So you might want to destroy your phone and never travel anywhere.

      And then add pretty much every business, government and non-governmental organisation on the planet because they all use Google, Facebook, etc tracking cookies / pixels / etc to discover what other websites you visit.

      Is there anything left not on your blacklist?

      1. Triggerfish

        Re: Tim Hortons

        *They plot your route and use it to increase advertising in high traffic areas.

        Actually some of the latest systems will look into your demographics, what purchases you may have made, run it past stores that they think are in your demographic pattern and allow them to target the advert directly as you come near to the advertising board.

        Also I have seen a demo of a set up that would look at what you were shopping (this was in a DIY store), and infer what you might want to buy next (looked at worktops, looked at taps, now off to the sinks - maybe you are doing a kitchen remodel) and then route a salesperson keyed with this information to you.

    3. John Smith 19 Gold badge
      Gimp

      im Hortons is a restaurant chain, not the NSA.

      But like all data fetishists, they think their "rights" trump everyobody elses.

    4. Brewster's Angle Grinder Silver badge

      The Loyalty penalty - take 2.

      "...what were they doing with it ?"

      Lower the prices to try and tempt you back?

      At the moment, that's quite hard to do. (Send you vouchers?) But when the menu and billing is all handled through a mobile phone, and we get individualised prices, this is exactly what will happen. Regulars will get get shafted and those who shop around will get wooed. It should be the other way around - but just look at what insurance and energy companies do.

    5. Triggerfish

      Re: Tim Hortons

      They will use it for last mile analytics.

      Where is the customer coming from?

      How did they get here?

      All this sort of stuff is actually useful data to retailers and urban planners.

      The ethics of how they are collected is sometimes questionable.

  3. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    And this is why...

    * I keep Location turned off on my phone unless actively using it

    * I don't install apps from stores/restaurants

    * My apps that have Location permission are **EXTREMELY** limited

    Seriously, this is a major invasion of privacy. There is NO excuse for collecting the location of users' homes or offices; if the user wants that data saved (like in a map app), the app can give an option to explicitly set it.

    Say no to Big Brother!

    1. heyrick Silver badge

      Re: And this is why...

      Google is doing everything they can to "help".

      Play Store appears to have removed all mention of requested "permissions" and replaced it with an utterly pointless bit about data safety (pointless because most apps say that there's no information provided).

      So now we have no way of determining if some scummy app wants access to your address book, etc etc.

      1. VoiceOfTruth

        Re: And this is why...

        -> Play Store appears to have removed all mention of requested "permissions"

        I noticed this a while back. Maybe it is because the permissions for far too many apps are more than what could be considered reasonable.

        A huge number of popular apps are probably slurping as much as they can.

      2. Dan 55 Silver badge

        Re: And this is why...

        They've buried them, first select About This App then scroll down until you're about one screen up from the bottom then select App Permissions.

        1. heyrick Silver badge

          Re: And this is why...

          Not there any more. It used to be.

          Now it's a link to "Data safety" which is pretty much useless as most haven't bothered to provide any information. Then underneath that, a new section on compatibility with my device.

          Here's a screenshot of the app information for a random app: https://imgur.com/a/daIOk8g.

          1. Dan 55 Silver badge

            Re: And this is why...

            I just checked that app. On my phone App Permissions is where Data Safety is, I guess that's one advantage of having an ancient(ish) phone which never got updated beyond Android 9.

            1. heyrick Silver badge

              Re: And this is why...

              My S9 is still on Android 8!

              But that's kind of irrelevant as this stuff is part of the Google Play Services stuff, isn't it?

              Perhaps it is being rolled out to different countries at different times? My Google Play Store is 30.6.16-21 [0] [PR] and a bunch of numbers that my dyscalculia doesn't want to let me remember...

              1. Dan 55 Silver badge

                Re: And this is why...

                Same here. I guess they're still in the middle of rolling it out to different models/networks/accounts/servers/whatever.

    2. Neil Barnes Silver badge

      ...but not when it was closed/quit.

      One of the things I really dislike about mobile phones is the lack of ease in ensuring that an application is actually closed down - and not just hiding in the background either waiting for activation or still running silently doing whatever it is that it is doing.

      It really should not be necessary to perform the equivalent of kill -9 via the applications management services to get rid of an application which is not currently required.

      1. Alumoi Silver badge

        Re: ...but not when it was closed/quit.

        It really should not be necessary to perform the equivalent of kill -9 via the applications management services to get rid of an application which is not currently required just to have it start again in a couple of seconds.

        I can't wait for xda to publish a working root method for my current phone so I can benefit from DeviceControl and DisableServices.

      2. ComputerSays_noAbsolutelyNo Silver badge

        Re: ...but not when it was closed/quit.

        Yeah, smartphone are simply just shitty computers.

        1. captain veg Silver badge

          Re: ...but not when it was closed/quit.

          I only ever wanted my "smartphone" to be a computer, non-shitty please.

          All I require from the "phone" part of "smartphone" is a cellular data connection. If it can make phone calls and do SMS stuff, well, I suppose that's handy too. I could live without it.

          What I never wanted was a closed app ecosystem that encourages "free" download in return for constant surveillance.

          I willingly paid money for PalmOS apps that did useful stuff on my Treo devices. I was impressed by the number of genuinely free apps available on Maemo.

          I was, and remain, shocked by the abuses considered normal on Android.

          I despair. What to do? (Don't suggest Apple devices without reading the first sentence.)

          -A.

          1. yetanotheraoc Silver badge

            Re: ...but not when it was closed/quit.

            Well, there is /e/ OS to consider.

            https://www.theregister.com/2022/06/02/murena_e_foundation_phone_test/

  4. Jamesit

    This is why I never enable location on my phone. I do have the Timmy's app installed.

    1. entfe001
      Black Helicopters

      The main problem relies on trusting settings managed by an OS whose maker has a damn good interest on having them always enabled for data snooping

      1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

        Vote for Lineageos (or GrapheneOS if you are more than normally paranoid)

        You would also be amazed at the number of pop up messages like "your weather forecast app is trying to read your contacts. Permit Y/N?"

    2. fidodogbreath

      If an app can access the list of visible SSIDs, it can determine your location to a high degree of accuracy.

  5. Grunchy Silver badge

    I heard that those automated traffic signs on the freeway track your phone’s unique Bluetooth identifier to work out how long it takes to travel to certain exit ramps. Shopping malls are known to use that same info to track where people go and presumably what they’re shopping for and how frequently they use the restroom. Companies that control cell towers could presumably use the same technique to determine how many people there are, where they all live, work, and what they’re up to in their off-hours, who they travel with, and who precisely are their friends, associates, colleagues.

    So it’s not your head that needs the tinfoil hat, it’s your cellular device!

    … as Osama Bin Laden famously found out.

    1. Fred Daggy Silver badge

      It's both (either/or) the Bluetooth and the Wifi mac on whatever device(s) you have. Whatever they can fix on.

      Of course, if your car has built in Wifi, you may be out of luck, when on the road.

      If the shops workers have actually placed the clothes, toys and other items where they should, retailers know exactly which items you've stopped to look at and/or grab. And what you looked at next. And if a bunch of devices were together, they may indicate a family (or carrying a lot of tech) - but both carry meaning for the retailer. If one purchases tampons, chocolates and sanitary products regularly, and then stops for one month, then bam! Start pushing the baby products.

    2. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

      >Companies that control cell towers could presumably use the same technique

      They do, our local authority buys the data to analyse rush hour traffic patterns.

      The data is anonymised by the cell company. Mostly because the phone companies have to work closely with govt and know that they would get stamped on, and the traffic engineers don't care who you are - just that somebody went from A-B and took C minutes.

  6. Barry Rueger

    Also..

    Tim Horton's coffee is really bad, as are their baked goods.

    1. werdsmith Silver badge

      Re: Also..

      Tim Hortons are now starting to open in the UK and they are seeing a bit of trade from people trying them out to see if they are as bad as their reputation. I found them to be even worse.

      1. wintergirl

        Re: Also..

        There's one near me, on one of those "retail parks" with the big sheds full of sofas. It opened with a minor fanfare in the local paper - the usual "hey, this brand you've seen on the internet is now available around here!" stuff.

        Within weeks, there were staff standing on the road outside holding arrow signs pointing in, with "MEALS £2.99" emblazoned on them. Not the sign of a business that's doing a roaring trade.

        I suspect it'll be here today, gone tomorrow. We've reached market saturation with these "famous" junk food/coffee brands - they all seem to be arriving at once, with Tim Horton's, Krispy Kreme, Dunkin' Donuts, Taco Bell, and even Cinnabon and Wendy's in town now. There just aren't the numbers to support them all.

        1. werdsmith Silver badge

          Re: Also..

          I remember Cinnabon being in Cambridge years ago, outside one of the entrances to Grand Arcade, but they’ve gone maybe 5 years ago. There also one in Milton Keynes shopping centre, but that went over 10 years ago.

          There have been Taco Bell attempts for decades, but they fizzle out, then after a pause, try again.

          I remember after I first had Taco Bell in the US in the 90s, I found one in Uxbridge. Dunkin’s have attempted to survive in London for years.

          It’s a bit like trying to grow tropical plants in our climate.

          1. wintergirl

            Re: Also..

            I guess these places have saturated their home markets and their (presumably) private equity owners are desperate for more "growth", so here they come. They don't seem to have a USP beyond "it's a famous brand, you've seen it on the telly or internet, now try our famous Timbits/Cinnabon/tacos/Dunkin' coffee/whatever the hell it is that Wendy's sells".

            20 years ago, there might have been a local market where I live for "famous" US/Canadian food brands because the offerings were limited to McDonald's or a terrible local pizza/burger/kebab dump, but not now. The local food scene is light years ahead of where it was, even at the low end that these brands inhabit, and these places can't compete on quality or on price.

        2. GruntyMcPugh

          Re: Also..

          We have a Tim Horton's in town, next to MacDonalds, and just along from a Taco Bell. There's a Krispy Kreme in the shopping centre iirc, and a Burger King, and Pizza Hut.

          I don't go into town any more.

    2. Chz

      Re: Also..

      It's an interesting distinction that I make here.

      Tim Horton's Coffee(tm), as coffee, is utterly detestable.

      Tim Horton's Coffee(tm), as a warm, caffeinated beverage isn't half bad and I've been known to enjoy it on occasion. It tastes nothing whatsoever like coffee and shouldn't be considered as such. But as a hot drink to go with a bit of pep juice in it, there are worse things.

      Fried dough is fried dough. I don't find them better or worse than any other company that specialises in such things, and far better than what the supermarkets turn out. It's basically a question of whether fried, sweet dough is appealing to you or not.

      I haven't tried it in the UK because they're studiously avoiding London. And I suspect I know why - their MSP in their home country is that it's acceptable food for cheap. Since London and cheap are an impossible pairing, they've kept out because no-one is going to pay silly amounts for their food and drink. They also started out up in Scotland, presumably because if they couldn't sell fried dough to the Scots then their entire business plan would be null and void.

      1. werdsmith Silver badge

        Re: Also..

        There is definitely a quality gradient for fried dough products. Tim’s Hortons is very slightly cheaper than Kristy Kreme, which most consider to be expensive in the UK, especially as they are not particularly good, but at least fresh. I found Hortons to be dried out, almost stale.

        1. wintergirl

          Re: Also..

          The ones from the Krispy Kreme shop here are fresh as you can see them actually being made in the store. They're okay, but there are better local places.

          The ones in the glass cases in supermarkets 40 miles from the nearest Krispy Kreme store? I've never even been close to being tempted. Goodness knows how long they've spent in the back of a van, and then in the glass case.

      2. iron Silver badge

        Re: Also..

        > They also started out up in Scotland, presumably because if they couldn't sell fried dough to the Scots then their entire business plan would be null and void.

        Fair enough you sassenach but the real reason would be because the founder is "Scottish" (in that way Canadians and Americans like to think they are).

        1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

          Re: Also..

          Different in Canada.

          In Vancouver, where there are more artisnal coffee shops than people, they suffer

          But a lot of Canada is rural and the Timmies is the only place to go/hang-out within 100km they are popular.

    3. cornetman Silver badge

      Re: Also..

      As a current resident of the Vancouver/Lower mainland I have to say that compared to Starbucks (which are pretty much on every corner), I do find that pretty much all the Timmies that I have been into seem very low-rent, scruffy and dirty.

      Not really sure why that is. It just seems that the Starbucks places are better maintained and cleaner. They just feel like nicer places to be in.

      1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

        Re: Also..

        Starbucks brand is that they are upmarket but chain-store predictable. You know it will be fancy but your drink will be identical wherever you are.

        Timmies are franchise. But in Vancouver they can only compete by cheap sites and using the minimum of cheap staff, typically family. None of their customers care about the cleanliness and nice decor.

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    What about Radar?

    "Radar's customers are responsible for obtaining appropriate consent"

    Indeed they are, but surely Radar are responsible for ensuring that their customers provide proof of such consent?

    If Radar had just provided software for Hortons to use, then maybe they could argue that Hortons bear full responsibilty for its misuse, but it seems that they actively collected and stored the data, so they should bear equal (or even greater) responsibility.

    1. Eclectic Man Silver badge

      Re: What about Radar?

      Radar: "Radar's customers are responsible for obtaining appropriate consent. We are not aware of any other situations in which our customers have not obtained appropriate consent for the collection and use of location data."

      Hmm, I wonder whether 'Radar' has even asked any of their customers whether they have obtained informed consent from the end users about collection of location data. Not being aware and trying a blind eye* are two different things.

      The clause in the Radar contract that explains who is liable under what laws and jurisdictions could prove interesting.

      *Horatio Nelson famously put his telescope to his blind eye at Trafalgar and proclaimed "I see no ships."

      1. TimMaher Silver badge
        Headmaster

        Re: Trafalgar

        Copenhagen.

        FTFY

        1. Yet Another Anonymous coward Silver badge

          Re: Trafalgar

          Well he wouldn't see Copenhagen from Trafalgar - even with a telescope. But it seems very specific, he also would see no Scunthorpe

          1. Eclectic Man Silver badge
            Facepalm

            Re: Trafalgar

            @ Tim Maher, you are entirely correct:

            https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/copenhagen-the-battle-of

            My memories from being a mixed infant at Chambersbury Primary School in the 1960's are clearly failing (because no primary school teacher would ever tell us little kiddies anything untrue).

            Also, 'Copenhagen' was the name of the Duke of Wellington's horse that he rode all day at what we Brits call the battle of Waterloo (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen_(horse)).

            History is so confusing at times.

    2. wintergirl

      Re: What about Radar?

      Notable that a company whose business is collecting and storing personal data on presumably millions of people speaks through an unnamed "spokesperson" in the press.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      @revenant - Re: What about Radar?

      Radar is off the hook here.

      Tim Hortons is responsible for the collection of data and they should have clearly define in the contract what Radar can and can not do with the collected data. They didn't do it and they now must face the consequences. Even the most inept lawyer could have told TH that, but it seems it was mostly a deal between developers and nobody bothered analyzing the potential risks. Now the management is in hot water and the reputation of TH is at stake.

      1. OhForF' Silver badge

        Re: @revenant - What about Radar?

        "it seems it was mostly a deal between developers"

        Why do you assume it was a developer that came up with the idea to include the radar stuff?

        I think it is more likely some greedy PHB saw a chance to make some extra money - and as a typical PHB knows it all there was no need to evalutate any risk or ask a lawyer.

  8. Splurg The Barbarian

    This is what really annoys me about mobile devices

    This is what really annoys me about mobile devices. Exactly what justification does ANY company meed to know where I am, where I go, how I get there, how I use something etc, etc?

    The correct answer is absolutely none!

    There shouldn't be any "without permission" or "but we had permission" it just should not happen at all.

    As it states in the article the app didn't collect data when it was closed, thr issue is far, far too many apps autorun, when you move from mobile data to WiFi for example, half.of them you have no idea they are running. As others have said should be away to cloose down apps so they cannot restart unless the user specifically chooses to.

    Most of the mobile games are just ways for companies to collect data, most apps are just ways for companies to collect data. There is absolutely no pushback on these companies, and a general acceptance of that's just how it is from the general public. Where is the outcry?

    1. Jamie Jones Silver badge

      Re: This is what really annoys me about mobile devices

      On android, "FORCE STOP", though if you ever use the app again, you have to re force-stop it after use.

      There is also the app "greenify" (and others) which is meant to stop apps running in the background.

      On my rooted device, I have a simple script that runs at startup that basically force-stops every installed app (excluding apps on a whitelist). It works alot better than any "greenify" app I've tried, but of course, requires root.

      Again, if you have root, you can install one of the many "intent" blockers that trigger app starts for various reasons (boot completed, wifi activated, wifi deacrivated, app installed, day of week has 'd" in it etc.)

      Another frequent android abuse is that without root, not only can you still not block apps that are configured to autostart on boot, you can't even tell which apps request it. Without an autostart blocker, all sorts of shite start on boot (random games etc.... they start backgrounded so don't even appear to have started by the user)

      These would be SIMPLE to block - Googles omission is obviously intentional.

      1. heyrick Silver badge

        Re: This is what really annoys me about mobile devices

        Intentional. Yup. Just like for how long the permission "is the user in a phone call" also leaked full information of who was calling, phone identity, etc etc. Maybe an accident in Android 1. That it persisted for many builds suggests it was purely intentional.

        And, as I mentioned above, you can't even see what permissions an app would ask for any more, which is a pretty big thing to do away with.

    2. Jellied Eel Silver badge

      Re: This is what really annoys me about mobile devices

      This is what really annoys me about mobile devices. Exactly what justification does ANY company meed to know where I am, where I go, how I get there, how I use something etc, etc?

      It's so the company can provide you with exciting new services! Your phone detects that you're awake because it knows what time you set your alarm for. It can then msg you a reminder that a 1l espresso would be great right about now, and a donut.

      It can measure the time taken between alarm going off, message being opened and use the phone's accelerometers to know you're in motion. So it can send you another exciting offer reminding you that a coffee and a donut would taste great right about now.

      It can detect you using your keyless entry to get in your car. It can send the location of the nearest shop to your autonav, because you'd really like a coffee & donut right about now. It can even optimise your route so you pass ever shop in the state, and remind you when you're say, 500m away that you're in proximity to Canada's best coffee and donuts, and doesn't that sound like a great start to your day?

      And as you enter the store, Mr Splurg, your coffee and donut will be ready and waiting for you, just the way our AI has determined you'd like it.

      So it's all good.

      Or just sadly inevitable. Especially as the OS vendors discovered gold in the data mining hills. In a perfect world, there'd be an easy way for normal users to retain privacy. But that means the OS vendors would lose a revenue stream from collecting and flogging all our private data. And despite apparently increasing awareness and concerns around privacy, OS and app vendors still feel ethically and morally obligated to perform data rape.

      It's a bit like on dear'ol Windows. Once upon a time, hitting the 'x' in the top right of a window would close the app. Now, despite there being a seperate button to minimise it, closing often just minimises the app to the tray. And if you close the app there, you'll probably notice it keeps innocent sounding 'web helper' processes running. And you may even notice that if you've run multiple apps, multiple web helpers will still be in the background, waiting to intercept your privates even as you type them into your browser.

      I still think the simplest solution is that every company that thinks it's ok to exfiltrate our personal data should be required to publish the data classes it collects for it's executives and board. If they think it's ok to follow us as we go about our lives, we should see how they go about theirs. So near real-time geolocation data, browsing and email history, apps installed and used etc.

      1. Anonymous Coward
        Anonymous Coward

        @Jellied Eel - Re: This is what really annoys me about mobile devices

        And not only OS vendors (except Linux/BSD (except Ubuntu's attempts of course) of course).

        These days, each and every thing you can attach a chip to (cars, tractors, kitchen appliances, street lights, traffic lights, mirrors, tooth brushes, toilet seats, other - and the list is constantly and rapidly growing) do this by design.

        Your data is sitting there warm and fresh to collected as many times it takes, the collection costs are decreasing and the profits of using it are increasing. What's not to like it ?

        Governments could have stopped this but they profit from it too so they decided not to do it (innovation, economy, child protection, law enforcement etc.)

      2. Eclectic Man Silver badge
        Unhappy

        Re: This is what really annoys me about mobile devices - App Wars

        All this tracking, and dystopian manipulating of people via the app is all very well and 'good', but what happens when Starbucks, Costa, McDonalds and the others also try to do it on the same phone at the same time?

        Will the apps slug it out to see which one can get me to drive within 50metres of their outlet first? I'm guessing that either my phone will burst into flames or battery life will reduce to 10 minutes.

        As for "every company that thinks it's ok to exfiltrate our personal data should be required to publish the data classes it collects for it's executives and board" that's not going to happen. When the 'Marlboro Man' was on an advertising shoot, he offered one of the executives a cigarette. He received the response "Those things are for dummies." I very much doubt that the Radar or Horton's executives 'drink their own champagne'. Much like I doubt any executive of Purdue Pharma (the Sackler family) ever took oxycontin for medicinal purposes. But then I guess I'm a cynical old git.

    3. heyrick Silver badge

      Re: This is what really annoys me about mobile devices

      "Where is the outcry?"

      Probably lost somewhere between "it's so easy to use" and having no idea whatsoever about the scale of data collection that actually happens.

      Secretly I'm hoping that the EU eventually get fed up with the pathetic Schrems yo-yo and decide that any and all data collection that isn't entirely and specifically authorised by the user (with clear easy to read explanation of what and why) will automatically result in custodial sentences for the directors of companies responsible for the apps. Trust me, this shit will come to a screeching halt if and when that happens.

  9. VoiceOfTruth

    After we was caught we admitted that blag

    -> a Tim Hortons spokesperson said the company has fully cooperated with the privacy commissions' investigations

    Yeah. Once they were caught. Try and put a positive spin on it.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      @VoiceOfTruth - Re: After we was caught we admitted that blag

      While offering their wrist for a mild slap.

      Hey, wait a minute! It's for the first time I agree with one of your posts. I even gave you an up vote. What's going on here ?

      1. Eclectic Man Silver badge
        Joke

        Re: @VoiceOfTruth - After we was caught we admitted that blag

        "Hey, wait a minute! It's for the first time I agree with one of your posts. I even gave you an up vote. What's going on here ?"

        Is the heady atmosphere of the celebrations of Her Britannic Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's 70 year reign going to your head?

        (I have great respect for HMQE2, but frankly all we really know about her is that she can keep her mouth shut, although, and here I am dicing with downvotes, even President Trump realised that conversations with HMQE2 are private, TV interview of him by, I think it was Piers Morgan, where he almost blabbed, so she cannot be all bad.)

        Two days of celebrations left, where did I leave the brandy?

  10. Grogan Silver badge

    "As a Canadian"

    As a Canadian, I'm here to tell you... Fuck Tim Hortons. They are like a cancer, spreading to your countries too. Their end goal is to displace everything else in smaller communities. Don't let them.

    Overpriced, cheaply made (with fake ingredients, fillers), garbage and their coffee isn't anything special. It'll do in a pinch, it's drinkable and has caffeine, but almost anywhere else or any other brand from the grocery store is better than that. It's all marketing brainwashing.

    Here you've got idiots that won't drink any coffee but Tim Hortons. (kind of like the psy-op Heinz ketchup has done on the population for more than half a century)

  11. This post has been deleted by its author

  12. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    My coffee/food rule of thumb

    The higher the profile/amount of outlets a brand has - the lower the overall quality of their product.

    Costa, I’m looking at you!

  13. captain veg Silver badge

    Tim Hortons

    Er, Tim what?

    ?

    -A.

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