back to article Big Tech's maps led ride-sharing giant Grab astray

Grab – the Singaporean ride-sharing app that beat Uber on its home turf – decided to develop its own maps because Big Tech's simply weren't up to the job, the company's head of product said at a conference in Singapore. The decision to do so came after several incidents made it clear that mapping services were not sufficiently …

  1. sreynolds Silver badge

    The uber model...

    Creating more serfs for the digital feudal overlords. The only think that the High Court did right was to try and make Uber treat it's drivers like humans.

  2. Johnb89

    Glad to hear it

    That the entire world doesn't live in large single family houses, drives cars, has big open straight roads, and doesn't care about the cost of petrol nor the environmental damage of driving pick up trucks seems to be a revelation to many in tech.

    Whether its defaulting to US letter page and paper size, always autocorrecting spelling to 'American' English regardless of settings, or assuming we know what the hell a fire hydrant looks like to get through a captcha..... sheesh.

    <rant over>

  3. David Pearce

    I find Google shows roads as uncongested when they are actually gridlocked because so many motorcycle delivery riders are weaving through.

    The fundamental error is not differentiating the App users into cars and bikes

  4. YetAnotherXyzzy

    I'm not surprised. At a previous job (not US, not Europe), I needed to work with local geo data. Google Maps' local data was pretty bad, and no wonder: submitting updates or corrections was clunky and took weeks to be approved. I switched to OpenStreetMap, which already had better local coverage, and could edit it myself in seconds. I've since moved on from that job but haven't left OSM.

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