back to article Patch now: Zoom chat messages can infect PCs, Macs, phones with malware

Zoom has fixed a security flaw in its video-conferencing software that a miscreant could exploit with chat messages to potentially execute malicious code on a victim's device. The bug, tracked as CVE-2022-22787, received a CVSS severity score of 5.9 out of 10, making it a medium-severity vulnerability. It affects Zoom Client …

  1. Ace2 Bronze badge

    Thanks for the reminder to delete it from my phone!

  2. chivo243 Silver badge
    Meh

    how nice

    Just received a zoom invite this morning.

  3. Charlie Clark Silver badge

    Browser-only for me

    Not that I think it guarantees security, but seeing as most of these clients are using WebRTC, staying in the browser makes more sense.

  4. FirstTangoInParis

    Force client updates?

    I’m aware most will have Zoom on auto update, but if you’re listening, Zoom peeps, I’d like the host to have the option of forcing guests to have a minimum version before being allowed to join, eg most recent minor revision. I think Zoom used to enforce this themselves at one time.

    Reason being I host a zoom call full of people for whom IT is a mystery and their platforms could be in any state.

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