back to article China's vice premier Liu He advocates technology and government cooperation

The vice premier of China and Xi Jinping's economic right hand man, Liu He, has offered a rare show of support to China's tech industry – both domestic and abroad. According to state-sponsored media, Liu told around 100 members of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Congress (CPPCC) it is important to have a good …

  1. Version 1.0 Silver badge

    The future is coming

    It seems that a lot of China's actions and attitudes are a prediction of what the other nations will say and do, generally in a way that makes them sound "unique" but these days that's just the way you post on TikTok Twitter...

  2. Pascal Monett Silver badge
    Big Brother

    "Liu He advocates technology and government cooperation"

    Of course, when he says "cooperation", he means "do as I say and you can continue functioning".

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "Liu He advocates technology and government cooperation"

      Correct. This is not "loosening the reins", this is clarification.

      "We really want you entrepreneurs to prosper along with the country. We're such nice guys!"

      "Here are the topics you may not comment upon. Here are the words you may not use. You will keep an open line to govt offices who will update those words and topics as needed. You will follow govt pronouncements slavishly. You will never even seem to oppose govt policies. Think on Jack Ma and 'the nail that sticks up gets hammered down'."

      Remember, we want to work with you, but most importantly, you work for us, or not at all.

  3. martinusher Silver badge

    ..and the tech industry is?

    Reading our (US) media you'd think that technology has the singular purpose of supporting a handful of social media companies and the advertising ecosystem that they've created. This may be front and center for many people and its certainly a major money spinner but its really just one relatively small corner of a huge field.

    The fact that the Chinese government doesn't like endemic spying on and influence peddling to their populations from a hostile foreign power shouldn't lead us to think that they're not aware of technology trends or even that they might be leading some of them.

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