back to article Uncle Sam probes Activision for any insider trading

Activision Blizzard is under investigation for possible insider trading including claims CEO Bobby Kotick tipped off some investors to buy more shares before the $68.7bn Microsoft acquisition deal was announced. The American games maker, known for top series such as World of Warcraft and Call of Duty, said it was cooperating …

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