back to article File Explorer fiasco: Window to Microsoft's mixed-up motivations

Queen Elizabeth I is said to have expressed her attitude to her subjects' private beliefs by noting: "I do not seek to open windows to men's souls." Microsoft Windows 11 has few such qualms. A new feature,accidentally enabled in an Insider build, not only opened a channel between the company and the quintessential tool, File …

  1. Flocke Kroes Silver badge

    Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

    If you need to focus on your work and really do not want malware: pay an hourly fee for Microsoft Enterprise Premium Plus which comes with free reduced advertising for the first 45 minutes.

    1. KittenHuffer Silver badge
      Terminator

      Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

      You are obviously a time traveller who has come back from 5 years in the future. Please tell us if the year of Linux on the desktop has arrived yet?!?

      If you can't answer then I'll just assume you're being chased by him ------->

      1. Steve Davies 3 Silver badge

        Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

        The OP didn't mention Linux at all so please get off your high horse...

        What we saw is clearly Microturds vision of the future where Ads are part of the OS itself and not just a [[cough][cough] feature of an app such as a web browser.

        I might be wrong but I get the feeling from previous comments on this that Ad in the file browser is well beyond the pale and is a mega step backwards.

        IMHO, Operating Systems are there to facilitate the user to do stuff. Anything that gets in the way of that purpose is to be avoided at all costs. MS has been eating away at our ease of doing stuff for years. This is just the next small step.

        I will not be going down that route. The IT industry as a whole needs to give a collective finger to MS. If it does not then... you see that slippery slope over there... lookout you might well be tumbling down it very soon.

        If you want to go all in with MS's ambitions for subscriptions and more tracking and slurping of your every keystroke/mouse movement then please go ahead but there are a lot of us who will not be following you down that slippery slope.

        1. KittenHuffer Silver badge
          Joke

          Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

          Does nobody recognise humour these days unless the specific (------->) icon is selected? </sarcasm>

          I was never on a high horse (cos vertigo). I was guessing that M$ are planning to go full 'commercial' version within 5 years, and was wondering how much of a boost to FOSS OS there would be. </rant>

          And if you still don't like my comments ya can go file system check for yourself! ;-)

          1. Tilda Rice

            Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

            LOL kitten. Its El Reg comments, so missing social cues is rampant :) - many on the scale, welcome to IT :)

            1. Anonymous Coward
              Anonymous Coward

              Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

              I think you mean many on the spectrum, not scale.

              [I get this may make me on the spectrum too....]

              1. BenDwire Silver badge
                Boffin

                Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

                I think you mean many on the spectrum, not scale.

                Surely that depends on whether they meant Autism or Mental Illness. Some of us register on both scales ...

                1. MrDamage Silver badge

                  Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

                  You forgot alcoholism. All three scales.

                  1. herman Silver badge
                    Facepalm

                    Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

                    And don’t call me Shirly!

                2. FIA Silver badge

                  Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

                  With the sedentary nature of IT some of us register quite high on the other scales too.

              2. fargoneicehole
                IT Angle

                Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

                pfft... who isn't!?

              3. Anonymous Coward
                Anonymous Coward

                Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

                Sinclair ZX Spectrum?

              4. Scott 53

                Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

                I was describing a colleague to my artist wife as being definitely on the spectrum. Her response? "You all are."

        2. Anonymous Coward
          Anonymous Coward

          @Steve Davies 3 - Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

          You're missing the point. Operating Systems are there to facilitate the user to do stuff and you clicking on those ads is included in that stuff.

          Unfortunately we all are going down that route and a collective finger will not stop MS, no matter if it's the size of Eiffel Tower. Let's face it, a customer revolt against Microsoft is less probable than a Bolshevik revolution in the US. Microsoft knows this very well and finds it entertaining.

        3. BobChip
          Linux

          Re: Re:Please tell us if the year of Linux

          "An OS is there to facilitate the user doing stuff"!!!! Well said.!!! Full marks!!!

          Could be that is why, for me, it has been "the year of Linux" for the last decade. And why it will continue to be so. It amuses me that the small number (about 20%) of my working colleagues / collaborators who still persist in using M$ seem to spend most of their time moaning about how awfull it is. The rest of us went Mac (Nix) or Linux years ago. And no longer have anything (IT related) to moan about.

          We now moan about important stuff, like the price of beer.......

      2. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

        "You are obviously a time traveller who has come back from 5 years in the future."

        From my PoV, just somebody who can see the way Microsoft would like to take things. The only questions for the likes of yourself seem to be how much of it will you let happen and how quickly and you seem to have answered the second already.

        1. sad_loser

          Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

          I think it is so that in future they can release the OS as freeware (bloatware / adware) and then you get to pay to turn the ads off.

          This increases their user install base from which to hoover data and provides a google-proof stream of advertising revenue.

          A high end laptop I bought came with a premium 'professional' version of Windows 10 installed and while I didn't mind the UI, it refused to let me remove the MS nagware / spyware / ads etc so I scrubbed the disk and installed POP-OS and have never looked back, especially with Steam playing all the Windows games I wanted to play.

          I am not a privacy / tin hat person by nature but I do get the feeling that MS is doing its best to turn me into one!

      3. Annihilator Silver badge

        Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

        "You are obviously a time traveller who has come back from 5 years in the future. Please tell us if the year of Linux on the desktop has arrived yet?!?"

        Let's face it, probably - only because a time travel device couldn't possibly powered by Windows. Unless in this instance the time traveller was actually attempting to travel forward in time.

    2. b0llchit Silver badge
      Mushroom

      Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

      You are mistaken. The personal computer is not for your convenience, but is purely a strategic source of revenue for microsoft. Any "productivity" you may experience is purely accidental and will be rectified in the next update.

      1. yetanotheraoc Silver badge

        Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

        "Microsoft is putting revenue ahead of security, ahead of productivity, ahead of quality control. Are these the attributes of a reliable enterprise partner who's positioning themselves as the very heart of corporate computing?"

        Priority 1 = Revenue

        Priority 2 = Revenue

        Priority 3 = Revenue

        => INVEST

    3. binary
      Happy

      Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

      No need to put up with irritation, security flaws, or pay fees to use software. There are fantastic alternatives to Adobe, and now Windows 11. That is, if you live in the free world and not Russia :(

      1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge

        Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

        If you live in Russia, the free alternatives might be your only choice with so many companies pulling out of their market.

        1. CommonBloke
          Pirate

          Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

          It's not like they see a difference between corporate and free alternatives

    4. Paradroid

      Re: Irritation and security flaws are an intentional feature

      You jest but I actually want this option - with a more reasonable price tag of course! Microsoft, please let me pay you per year or per release for a well-maintained, private, secure, ad-free operating system. Oh and it needs to get out my way on choice of web browser, and let me log in with a local account.

  2. Alumoi Silver badge

    Microsoft is putting revenue ahead of security, ahead of productivity, ahead of quality control...

    And this is news? Where have you been in the last, oh, 30 years?

    1. LDS Silver badge

      Re: Microsoft is putting revenue ahead of security, ahead of productivity

      There was a not-so-subtle difference. Once revenue came from selling software - and people had to perceive a real advantage in buying new software. Now revenues come from hoarding user data, and the use that to sling them ads to make them buy stuff - inside software they get for free or almost.

      That's why they need CEOs with utter contempt for users - and only keen to deep pocket advertisers.

      1. fidodogbreath Silver badge

        Re: Microsoft is putting revenue ahead of security, ahead of productivity

        Once revenue came from selling software - and people had to perceive a real advantage in buying new software. Now revenues come from hoarding user data

        Actually, now their revenue comes from both.

      2. swm Silver badge

        Re: Microsoft is putting revenue ahead of security, ahead of productivity

        Originally software was free and the money was made by selling (main frame) hardware.

  3. Greybearded old scrote Silver badge

    what does it say about Microsoft's internal quality control?

    It says this.

    1. captain veg Silver badge

      Re: what does it say about Microsoft's internal quality control?

      It says that they never moved on from "if it compiles we ship it".

      Remember that when considering adopting Typescript.

      -A.

      1. yetanotheraoc Silver badge

        Testing in production anti-pattern

        QUOTE: Canary releases are similar to blue-green deployments. Instead of switching all traffic to the updated application, you route only a small portion of the traffic to the new deployment. If there's a problem, revert to the old deployment. If not, gradually route more traffic to the new version. If you're using Azure App Service, you can use the **Testing in production feature** to manage a canary release. END-QUOTE

        -- https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/framework/devops/release-engineering-cd#stage-your-workloads

        Followed by "a limited number of users were affected"...

  4. Mike 137 Silver badge

    "worth the extra security risk they inherently present"

    Not Microsoft's risk - the security risk is entirely a user problem. I'm stating the obvious here, but if you count even just the critical vulnerabilities reported for any single version of Windows and note how little this deluge of hazards to users has actually affected either the MS bottom line or its domination of the OS space, it'll be obvious that they just don't care about anything much except the revenue stream - all the more now a high proportion of it is subscription-based so they can turn the screw more readily.

    But I'm not specifically MS-bashing here. The idea that users' needs (including security) are now a high priority for software vendors generally is merely a myth. Like all businesses with captive markets, they're primarily interested in their balance sheets.

    1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

      Re: "worth the extra security risk they inherently present"

      "Like all businesses with captive markets, they're primarily interested in their balance sheets."

      But is that market capture guaranteed? It consists largely of businesses that have their own bottom line to tend to. How much more intrusion into their affairs will it take for those customers to start to review the market? Anyone not firmly wedded to Windowsland knows very well that other desktop environments can be re-skinned to like more or less any version of Windows that takes your fancy. It's quite easy to envisage a PC vendor pre-installing Linux or BSD with a first run menu for a new user which offers a choice of any Windows UI from W2K to present.

      In this context the spoiler of "It doesn't run my gamez" won't get far; this is a work machine. The other spoiler, the user with a massive investment in Excel macros, might end up finding themselves the corporate odd man out, just like the user who must have a Mac. There might even be a market in tools to convert those spreadsheets into one-off applications.

      1. Greybearded old scrote Silver badge

        Re: "worth the extra security risk they inherently present"

        I've said around here before, the business world didn't learn anything from all the earlier f...f...foul-ups so they're unlikely to now.

        "That's just how things are," right?

      2. Mike 137 Silver badge

        Re: "worth the extra security risk they inherently present"

        "But is that market capture guaranteed?"

        Unfortunately, it pretty much is. Your argument is excellent and would be perfectly valid in a rational world, but we don't seem to be in one.

        We only have to review the extent to which Office 365 has come to dominate almost the entire public sector and a high proportion of the private, to recognise that most tech decisions are not made by objectively considering all the alternatives. I've on more than one occasion been told I've "over complicated" when arranging review-based tendering for mission critical tech services. In one instance, the CTO and CIO didn't even want to get involved - they just wanted me to make the decision alone and present them with the result. In my absence they'd probably have chosen on the basis of apparent price alone.

        1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

          Re: "worth the extra security risk they inherently present"

          Never underestimate the way things can change in the IT world and how fast irrespective of how entrenched things seem to be.

          When I started in IT we were the upstarts in a DEC dominated world by using Unix and RDBMS. I think the latter was even looked on as the more radical. We were always going to be taken under the VMS wing in about six months' time.

          1. Anonymous Coward
            Anonymous Coward

            @Doctor Syntax - Re: "worth the extra security risk they inherently present"

            The combination between Office 365, Exchange Online and Azure with all their tools and features is practically unbeatable. Moving away from this Holy Trinity would require so much effort that in the end there would be no benefit.

            Besides, companies today are lazy and they no longer poses necessary expertise for such an endeavour.

        2. Electronics'R'Us Silver badge
          Facepalm

          Office 365

          I have recently been lumbered with this on the company laptop and it is truly an abomination; it really has reinforced my opinion of Microsoft products [1].

          Meeting invitations - the meeting notice takes half the screen vertically and cannot be hidden or reduced.

          'To' fields are unnecessarily large, again reducing useable screen real estate.

          Slow startup (even slower than the previous versions and that is saying something) and other 'usability features' that look like they have brought in the 4 year olds and armed them with crayons male the whole thing a really good reason to not 'upgrade' anything on my personal equipment to this detritus.

          Admittedly, I am now dual booting the laptop that has access to the network (and very glad I have taken that step).

          [1] Which wasn't very positive even before this.

      3. LDS Silver badge

        " It consists largely of businesses"

        Despite what the author says, IMHO this would be a feature that won't be activated on any Azure AD joined device - when you buy Windows Enterprise subscriptions, which are sold only to business customers.

        Everybody else will be on the Windows Lemon Edition which will hoard your data and use them against you in the form of adverts or whatever else they think can make a lot of money. That's what consumer IT became under the care of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft.

    2. ComputerSays_noAbsolutelyNo Silver badge

      Re: "worth the extra security risk they inherently present"

      This.

      And the beauty of the scheme is, that due to the existence of the EULA, you can't even expect the OS to work as intended. No software in existence guarantees that it actually works, not the gratis stuff and not the paid-for stuff.

      So, every bug is a feature, I guess.

    3. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: "worth the extra security risk they inherently present"

      Perhaps my institution is one step ahead of the game. We have just been rolled out (over?) with something called BeyondTrust which flags up any activity it thinks should be access controlled and then requires an authorisation code from IT. I'm sure that would stop any advert malware trouble brought in with File Explorer. The unfortunate thing was that this thing's first action was to stop a browser update. You'll have guessed what the only way to get an authorisation code is - short of kicking someone in IT's door in...

      Most of my PCs are used for data collection off scientific instruments. It's getting to the stage where I'm spending more time making up for Windows problems than solving science issues. Sigh.

  5. Sleep deprived
    FAIL

    Accidental ads in File Explorer

    No, no, not a company policy. Just yet another programmer we let loose. The poor kid had no clear idea what an OS is, and he wanted to please his boss. Now, if we comment out his code, we'll break his heart. But don't worry, he'll learn from his mistake.

    1. Dan 55 Silver badge

      Re: Accidental ads in File Explorer

      Did the rogue programmer cook up his plan with an outlaw dev-opser to set up a server to push adverts and someone AWOL from QA to test the everything and someone freelance from Installations to package up the build and put it on the update server and a mercenary technical author doing release notes and etc... etc...?

      1. herman Silver badge

        Re: Accidental ads in File Explorer

        Of coarse. How else?

    2. ComputerSays_noAbsolutelyNo Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: Accidental ads in File Explorer

      Just like the Volkswagen scanal on diesel emissions was caused by rogue engineers, manglement was in no way involved, honestly.

  6. Dinanziame Silver badge
    Unhappy

    Ads in the OS

    Ouch. I'll stay with Apple then. Privacy is not my concern, but distractions definitely are.

  7. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Choice....I've heard of it....but M$ has NEVER heard of it!!

    Readers with long memories will recall that "Evangelism is War", according to James Plamondon of Microsoft in 2000.

    Link: http://antitrust.slated.org/www.iowaconsumercase.org/011607/3000/PX03096.pdf

    That view actually means "war" with the customer....because Microsoft's goals have always been at variance with the needs of customers.

    The customer, according to Microsoft, is there to suck up exactly what Microsoft dishes out...the customer will pay for what Microsoft dishes out....

    ...and of course, the customer will like it...or lump it!!

    ....twenty-two years later.....nothing changes..........

  8. ShadowSystems Silver badge

    Spanners...

    "It's like paying a fortune for the world's finest spanner, only to find the handle shot through with punched-out pitches to buy Satya Nadella's nuts and bolts."

    If Windows is a spanner then I want to use my copy to get the jaws good & tight around his nuts & torque them right the fek off.

    Now where did I put the power spanner?

  9. Howard Sway Silver badge

    weakening the security and functionally of core components for adventures in advertising

    Well, this is just the start of the softening-up process in order to gently let the idea of the ad festooned application become established in people's minds. All of this "oops we did this accidentally, and now everybody's talking about it" ploy looks very deliberately planned to do that.

    Once they've got it up and running for real on non corporate computers, they will be able to move on to the next step of the plan : The advert API for businesses.

    Companies will be able to earn money (or maybe "discounts on MS products and services") by allowing adverts into their own applications, just as long as those ads are served by MS of course. So, for instance you might be in the sales office processing sales orders on your in-house application and just before lunchtime up pops an ad for a local sandwich shop. What's the harm in that, they'll say. It's even paying for your own app development work! And there'll be no ad blocking possible if you make it a corporate policy to mandate these ads.

    Why would companies object? I can remember several "exclusive discounts for specially selected business partners" promotions being flung at me at one company I worked for : this would be not much further beyond the line of acceptability than that. However much it made you despair of the new depths that had been sunk to.

    1. LDS Silver badge

      by allowing adverts into their own applications

      Just like mobile apps already do? The other APIs are for data hoarding....

  10. VoiceOfTruth

    My view on Windows

    Starting from NT rather than the DOS-based things...

    NT 3.5(1) was sort of OK but limited.

    NT 4. Usable, limited in its own ways. Stability with some drivers was a big problem. Fart in the same room and it could crash.

    Win2K. Very good. Stable, responsive, didn't try to do 'too much', probably the best of the Windows family.

    XP. Inflicting gaping security holes on the wider world. Usable, wide support across the board.

    Vista. Skipped.

    7. Stable, slower (meaning here less responsive) by a long way in comparison to Win2K.

    8. Skipped.

    10. Tried it for a while. Saw how slow and unresponsive it is compared with 7. Decided to stick to 7 and not upgrade. Shove it, Bill.

    11. Haven't tried it.

    1. Pirate Dave Silver badge
      Pirate

      Re: My view on Windows

      Win2k was the last version (well, let's ignore ME) before Microsoft's "Trustworthy Computing" initiative began. That's when the complexity level for Windows went through the roof, and marks the beginning of Microsoft's long, slow, descent into the fog of their own mediocrity. Obviously, Microsoft is having massive corporate-cultural issues with the "Trustworthy" part, since the "Computing" part hasn't changed much in the past 35 years other than to get faster and be slightly more graphical. This latest ad-slinging "accident" just shows they still don't have a handle on "Trustworthy", even after 20 years of intense soul-searching and meditation. It just isn't in their culture, and never truly will be.

      1. Doctor Syntax Silver badge

        Re: My view on Windows

        You're looking at it wrong. It's not Microsoft who need to be trustworthy to you. It's your PC that has to be trustworthy to Microsoft. You don't think that TPM is for your benefit,do you?

  11. Anonymous Coward
    Anonymous Coward

    Nitpicky, but...

    "Now the company has taken a utility that's been at the heart of Windows since the first version and plastered it with advertisements. "

    Nope - (File) Explorer didn't exist in versions prior to Windows 95 - we had File Manager then. In Windows 95 and a few versions thereafter we had both Explorer and File Manager, and then File Manager got dropped.

    Still been around a while, though...

    1. Nugry Horace

      Re: Nitpicky, but...

      And before Windows 3.x it was MS-DOS Executive.

      1. CrazyOldCatMan Silver badge

        Re: Nitpicky, but...

        And before Windows 3.x it was MS-DOS Executive.

        Or Norton Commander. In the days when Norton was usable and trustworthy..

        (Most of my linux VMs have Midnight Commander installed..)

  12. Steve Channell
    Windows

    Whatever..

    A banner that says "you're using notepad, have you considered VS Code" might be welcome, as would "you're using Access, have you considered uninstalling it" would be welcome.

    Links like the next ripoff crypto scam appearing in any app {explorer, edge, Twitter, the Facebook} are a problem.. if MS sticks to the former, surely the question is whether we get anything for tolerating it

    1. John Brown (no body) Silver badge
      Joke

      Re: Whatever..

      as would "you're using Access, have you considered uninstalling it" would be welcome.

      You appear to be building a lrage and complex database. Would you prefer to open Excel now?

    2. gz

      Re: Whatever..

      Lmao

    3. gz

      Re: Whatever..

      Rotfl

  13. Alpharious

    They need to stop readding Phillip K Dick over there.

    I understand that with the death of TV the advertisements had to go somewhere, but file explorer? really? Or is this a scheme to force people to learn powershell because powershell scripts seem to be the only damn way to remove microsoft problems? Or are the advertisements there to cover NSA malware? What next, cortona robots that kick the door down, give us a sales pitch, and an involuntary 30 day free trial?

    1. martinusher Silver badge

      Re: They need to stop readding Phillip K Dick over there.

      They're just mind melding with Andriod. On a mobile/tablet device everything generates a revenue stream, either directly, through advertising or indirectly through snooping. Most of the power of these devices is swallowed up by this ecosystem.

      So we end up in a dystopia n universe where advertising is blaring at us 24/7. We're there already. It doesn't look quite like "Blade Runner" but its close.

    2. yetanotheraoc Silver badge

      Re: They need to stop readding Phillip K Dick over there.

      "is this a scheme to force people to learn powershell"

      You know there can be ads in powershell.

  14. Tom B
    Holmes

    Preparation for MS Chromebook clone

    No need for conspiracy theories. Microsoft has already said they were planning a clone of the Chromebook. To do that effectively, they need a version of Windows manufacturers can use cost-free. To do that, Windows needs to be ad-supported to supply revenue. It's as simple as that. They know darn well their current users would fight ads tooth-and-nail, and won't risk it. Ads will be a great incentive for users to upgrade to Windows Home, which will be ad-free.

  15. DS999 Silver badge

    Maybe they are going to make Windows Home "free"?

    Get people to pay to upgrade to Pro if they want to avoid the ads, like how some streaming services offer a cheaper ad supported tier, and a premium tier without ads.

    1. Roland6 Silver badge

      Re: Maybe they are going to make Windows Home "free"?

      Dream on, if they can charge users and get paid to serve advertising they will. It will be presented in the form that Windows is very expensive and that neither the adverting nor subscription fee covers MS's costs.

      Ie. MS have grown fat and greedy and is unable to go back to the days when customers made a one-off upfront payment of circa £100 for a version of Windows and 10 years of updates and fixes.

      1. Richard IV

        Bill Hicks was right about marketing people

        Around about the time Tivos became a thing, and the big old media companies were claiming that the Tivo's shiny new ad skipping feature was a form of stealing, someone wrote in to one of the big papers pointing out:

        * back in the 1950s and the dawn of commercial television, there were 10 minutes of adverts per hour during the Superbowl, but that was part of the deal to watch it for free.

        * now it's $70 per month for a sports package and there are 15 minutes of adverts per hour

        * who is stealing from whom?

  16. Steve Davies 3 Silver badge
    Facepalm

    It gets worse...

    Now Microfuck is adding a watermark to screens where W11 detects unsupported hardware.

    https://tech.slashdot.org/story/22/03/21/1523212/windows-11-gets-a-desktop-watermark-on-unsupported-hardware

    There seems no end to their ability to kick users in their dangly bits.

    Proudly Windows free since 2016.

    1. Dwarf Silver badge

      Re: It gets worse...

      If only they could put as much effort into fixing the broken bits of Windows and adding genuinely useful features

  17. herman Silver badge
    Facepalm

    We

    Her majesty would have said we.

  18. Richocet

    How much worse will the "Your computer has a virus, download the fix here" advertisements be when they are served up in File Explorer?

    This is a terrible idea from a greedy and ambitious senior manager.

  19. Blackjack Silver badge

    Remember when they charged you money to buy Windows? Can we please go back to that and cut the ads crap? If you want ads include them in online services that are not really free cause they take your data, like Google does.

  20. bazza Silver badge

    Not Very Effective

    I reckon that your most numerous PC user is actually quite unlikely to be using File Explorer much in the first place, logging into a Web browser the moment the machine boots.

    So ads in File Explorer are just going to piss off professionals, who are going to be the most annoyed.

    1. David Nash

      Re: Not Very Effective

      Unless they also appear in File->Open or Save boxes, which are pretty much mini-file-explorer windows anyway.

  21. Mike Pellatt

    *Microsoft is putting revenue ahead of security"

    I'm old enough to remember ActiveX being launched.

    Infosec community: "This is a security disaster in the making".

    Microsoft: "Yabut our customers are demanding it"

    1. Blackjack Silver badge

      I am old enough to remember Direct X 1.0 that you know gave you a pront to REPLACE YOUR VIDEO DRIVER WITHOUT CHECKING IF IT WAS COMPATIBLE.

      The result? You had to boot in safe mode to remove Direct X 1.0 and put the old driver back, if you were lucky.

      If you weren't, you had to reboot in dos mode and delete the Direct X files manually.

  22. Sabot
    Unhappy

    Now where did I leave my Norton Commander

    Must be on the NAS somewhere...

  23. Alan Bourke

    In the unlikely event this does ever appear

    It will be in the consumer SKUs, very much not in the corporate SKUs and as for how the military would get along with it ...

  24. Big_Boomer

    Pushback

    I have started a push back against the ubiquitous advertising that is forced upon me day in and day out. If an advertisement bugs me, then I NEVER ever buy that product and seriously consider never buying any of that companies products. There are already several companies on my "never-buy-list" for a variety of reasons. It would be a pity to have to add Microsoft, but if they insist then so be it.

  25. Kaki
    Meh

    'net connection

    Now it becomes clear why they need a constant internet connection, they will be serving ads at all times. Of course, for your convenience and security.

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