back to article China launches test satellites for orbiting broadband service

Chinese satellite broadband outfit GalaxySpace has launched the first satellites in a planned low Earth orbit constellation that will eventually offer a wireless internet service. The sats went aloft over the weekend atop a Long March 2-C rocket that also hauled an Earth observation sat into the heavens. GalaxySpace aims to …

  1. b0llchit Silver badge
    Big Brother

    Self serving for control

    If Beijing sticks to a nice low number like 144 the service won't be useful beyond the Middle Kingdom

    But they are perfectly aligned with the great firewall. Target is internal networking, not external. People will already have access to most of anything once they are stationed outside the firewall's, hm, country's borders. China's birds will make enforcing a domestic ban on any foreign satellite connectivity easier while providing a local and controlled system inside the firewall.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Self serving for control

      One has to wonder how effective enforcing a ban on others satellite internet systems will be, given the small foot print. Such a connection to the real Internet would be standalone as even if one would want to connect it to the net inside the great firewall (or inside Russia or Iran), as doing so would certainly give it's location away to the authorities. So it's threat spreading the contagion of truth is limited.

      1. b0llchit Silver badge
        Big Brother

        Re: Self serving for control

        Transmitters can be tracked.

        Coarse location by satellite and the narrow search quite easily with a modern army of drones. You could also skip the sat-track if you have enough mid-to-high-altitude surveillance.

  2. PhilipN

    Nice low number?

    If the purpose is to connect the entire country - and ONLY the country - parts of which including rural areas are poorly connected… isn’t that obvious?

    What is it with this shambolic article? I’m still waiting for the punch line to understand the point of “surveillance” in the heading, unless that was exclusively to grab attention from Google’s spider.

    1. Anonymous Coward
      Anonymous Coward

      Re: Nice low number?

      What part of "The sats went aloft over the weekend atop a Long March 2-C rocket that also hauled an Earth observation sat into the heavens." did you not understand?

      1. PhilipN

        Re: Nice low number?

        What part of “144 birds for small-footprint high-surveillance service” did you not understand?

    2. Nightkiller

      Re: Nice low number?

      If the purpose is to track where the connections are coming from the entire country - and ONLY the country - parts of which including rural areas are poorly connected… isn’t that obvious?

      FTFY

      1. PhilipN

        Re: Nice low number?

        "If ..."

  3. AVR

    144 satellites means there'd be much fewer over China at any given moment, maybe only one or two. LEO orbits aren't geosynchronous at all, about the best you could get is that they wouldn't go further north than is useful in China. I'm dubious that this would improve Internet connectivity in rural China significantly.

    I mean, if there are thousands of connections sure, but could one satellite handle millions?

  4. 89724102172714182892114I7551670349743096734346773478647892349863592355648544996312855148587659264921 Bronze badge

    fscking hell yet more extinction event asteroid obscuring space graffiti. at this rate humanity will never form offworld colonies, will destry itself on earth unable to launch for the thick myriad of swirling unpredictable sometimes secret and cloaked dead defunct space junk. what's wrong with cables

    1. IceC0ld

      kind of hard to get the extension leads up to that altitude IIRC :o)

      1. 89724102172714182892114I7551670349743096734346773478647892349863592355648544996312855148587659264921 Bronze badge
  5. Notas Badoff

    I'm still waiting for more information about the Viasat terminals suddenly dying on a certain recent invasion day. 30,000 of them?

    Here's the ElReg article that very much in passing mentioned it, and here's the linked external article. And NASA says !

    Everyone mentioned the 5,800 wind turbines on that day, because the German regulator put out a statement that the electric wouldn't stop. But everybody else has been remarkably mum. What's going on Reg?

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

Anonymous cowards cannot choose their icon

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2022